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Posted: 5/3/2009 10:57:24 AM EDT
I'm interested in purchasing a 10/22 with most likely an 18" barrel or so.  Not sure if I should go short barrel 16.5 or 18"  (opinions are helpful)  I'm thin 5'7" 150lbs.  I see some have "target" barrels which are heavier.  Why are they heavier?  Pros vs Cons of this?

Primary uses Appleseed Shoot (I want to learn to shoot), small game hunting, plinking, possibly small varmints, shooting things when I can't afford other ammo.

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


What places can you order a 10/22 that fits these requirements and be economical?  I heard they can be around 250 dollars, but see gunbroker has them over 350 currently.  I see Ruger.com has a lot of different models.  Most of them look the same to me.

I will be replacing the sights to the ones Appleseed recommends so the sights are unimportant to me that they come with as I'm switching them to peeps.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 10:58:20 AM EDT
[#1]
I would buy a cheap one, since you are probably going to customize it anyway.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 10:58:31 AM EDT
[#2]
Do you have an AR15?
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 10:59:11 AM EDT
[#3]
Dig in... everything you ever want to know and more.

http://rimfirecentral.com/forums/
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 10:59:32 AM EDT
[#4]
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:00:43 AM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
Do you have an AR15?


No.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:00:52 AM EDT
[#6]
The heavy barrel models are usually more accurate than the standard barrel, however the standard barrels are often quite accurate themselves, just boils down to which one you like better IMO.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:07:49 AM EDT
[#7]
The new 10/22 have a plastic trigger.
See if you can find one used as cheap as possible. Parts are cheap.  I have one from 86 it is nice paid $150 a couple years ago. I added a different hammer I think that cut the trigger pull weight down. the newer plastic trigger groups are not as nice and easy to tune.
green mountain has good barrels but they have a bunch of military contracts now so they haven' t been making 10/22 barrels.
If you have the cash build a .22 AR. spikes has bolts and barrels in stock but you are talking alot more cash. I understand all the liberty training rifle stuff. but I would rather shoot a .22 AR than a 10/22 with tec sights. The appleseed people seem to think that when SHTF everyone will be shooting garands.
But in the arfcom tradition I have  both. I use my 10/22 mostly for hunting it is setup for early season squirrel 60 yard and under shots.
 
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:09:22 AM EDT
[#8]
Quoted:
I would buy a cheap one, since you are probably going to customize it anyway.


First post nails it once again.

If you spend more than $200 on a 10/22, you got ripped off. Check Dick's as they used to have great prices. Don't waste your time at their site online however.

Go here to get a better feel for what is out there: Rimfire Central



Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:09:43 AM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
The new 10/22 have a plastic trigger.

See if you can find one used as cheap as possible. Parts are cheap.  I have one from 86 it is nice. I added a different hammer I think that cut the trigger pull weight down. the newer plastic trigger groups are not as nice and easy to tune.

green mountain has good barrels but they have a bunch of military contracts now so they haven' t been making 10/22 barrels.

If you have the cash build a .22 AR. spikes has bolts and barrels in stock but you are talking alot more cash. I understand all the liberty training rifle stuff. but I would rather shoot an ar than a 10/22 with tec sights.

But in the arfcom tradition I have  both. I use my 10/22 mostly for hunting it is setup for early season squirrel 60 yard and uinder shots.








I went to buy one a few months ago. I picked it up, saw that, gave a put it back on the counter and out of my mind forever.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:19:40 AM EDT
[#10]
Can the plastic parts be easily swapped with steel parts?  I'm assuming parts are cheap for this rifle?
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:25:35 AM EDT
[#11]
It is the entire trigger group so it depends. Some sites list them for sale but the new ones from brownells I believe are coming as plastic parts. Ruger is not making the aluminum ones anymore so they aren't supplying them as spare parts.





So look around and see it could be $100 or more. this guy says he will keep using the aluminum ones he has in stock until they run out.



http://www.hornetproducts.com/ViewProduct.asp?ModelNumber=BRT



rimfire technologies has custom made triggers housing for $89.





Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:26:02 AM EDT
[#12]
Quoted:
Can the plastic parts be easily swapped with steel parts?  I'm assuming parts are cheap for this rifle?


That is the first thing you want to do with any factory 10/22 trigger.

Ruger is so afraid of getting sued that they make the triggers extremely hard to pull on purpose.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:28:18 AM EDT
[#13]
So it can be done as long as you know what you're doing easily and replace the parts?


What would the pros and cons be of wood vs synthetic stock?  How much weight do you save by going with a synthetic stock at the cost of durability?
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:28:47 AM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
The new 10/22 have a plastic trigger.

See if you can find one used as cheap as possible. Parts are cheap.  I have one from 86 it is nice paid $150 a couple years ago. I added a different hammer I think that cut the trigger pull weight down. the newer plastic trigger groups are not as nice and easy to tune.

green mountain has good barrels but they have a bunch of military contracts now so they haven' t been making 10/22 barrels.

If you have the cash build a .22 AR. spikes has bolts and barrels in stock but you are talking alot more cash. I understand all the liberty training rifle stuff. but I would rather shoot a .22 AR than a 10/22 with tec sights. The appleseed people seem to think that when SHTF everyone will be shooting garands.

But in the arfcom tradition I have  both. I use my 10/22 mostly for hunting it is setup for early season squirrel 60 yard and under shots.






 


wait... so we WONT all be shooting Garands? What the fuck did I miss?

Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:30:22 AM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:
So it can be done as long as you know what you're doing easily and replace the parts?


The one I got was a kit from Clark and it came with simple instructions.

I did it myself in about 10 minutes
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:31:33 AM EDT
[#16]






wait... so we WONT all be shooting Garands? What the fuck did I miss?


I won't. I can't imagine how my grandpa carried that heavy thing all over europe.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:34:07 AM EDT
[#17]
I've owned one since '80 and other than adding a scope it is still stock.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:34:26 AM EDT
[#18]
The Appleseed allows you to shoot an AR15, AK47, SKS, or other rifle you have.

I want to learn to shoot and it looks like it will be great fun.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:40:07 AM EDT
[#19]
Quoted:
So it can be done as long as you know what you're doing easily and replace the parts?


What would the pros and cons be of wood vs synthetic stock?  How much weight do you save by going with a synthetic stock at the cost of durability?




If you have any gunsmith ability, you can make the factory trigger just as smooth as anything you can buy, all the aftermarkets triggers are just polished with lighter springs I can do that myself without spending 50 bucks.

I had no idea they had gone to plastic trigger housings, Ebay and Gunbroker should make it easy to find a used metal one.

Stocks depend on which one you buy, the factory synthetic stock doesn't weigh much less than the factory wood stock does. The target wood stocks tend to weigh more by design so if you want a target type stock you might look into synthetics.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:41:08 AM EDT
[#20]
Quoted:
So it can be done as long as you know what you're doing easily and replace the parts?


What would the pros and cons be of wood vs synthetic stock?  How much weight do you save by going with a synthetic stock at the cost of durability?


The 10/22 trigger group is very easy to work on, there are many tutorials online. The plastic stock is a lot lighter, and plenty strong, but I think Ruger's is too short. Most people go aftermarket.

The factory barrel is fine until you want to get really accurate, then you need a better made one , or get your factory barrel tuned. I think the factory barrel makes a great field gun, because it's light and handy.

I wouldn't get a stainless one. A used barrel is easy to find if yours gets rusty and the receiver is exactly the same, except it is only clear coated. Not really worth the extra cash.

10-22's are as addicting as AR's.

The two most popular mods are a Volquarston hammer and extractor. Literally, every  part can be swapped out for a aftermarket version.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:44:19 AM EDT
[#21]
Id buy one for as cheap as possible used since there is such a huge amount of aftermarket goodness for them.

I paid $100 for my base 10/22 wood stock 18.5" standard barrel.

I put on a hogue overmolded stock and a Tactical Solutions 16" threaded barrel. They have all the accuracy goodness of a bull barrel with none of the weight.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:51:25 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:
Quoted:
I would buy a cheap one, since you are probably going to customize it anyway.


First post nails it once again.

If you spend more than $200 on a 10/22, you got ripped off. Check Dick's as they used to have great prices. Don't waste your time at their site online however.

Go here to get a better feel for what is out there: Rimfire Central





I'm also looking to pick one up and I've been to three gun stores in the area, including Dicks, and the cheapest was new 10/22 was about $230.  
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:53:40 AM EDT
[#23]
What are the "All Weather" models?  Do they have more stainless parts or something?

I think I want synthetic with a SS barrel 18.5"  I think that would be great for my needs and wants.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:56:04 AM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I would buy a cheap one, since you are probably going to customize it anyway.


First post nails it once again.

If you spend more than $200 on a 10/22, you got ripped off. Check Dick's as they used to have great prices. Don't waste your time at their site online however.

Go here to get a better feel for what is out there: Rimfire Central





I'm also looking to pick one up and I've been to three gun stores in the area, including Dicks, and the cheapest was new 10/22 was about $230.  


We have members here who like to base today's prices on what they paid several years ago.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:57:37 AM EDT
[#25]





Quoted:



What are the "All Weather" models?  Do they have more stainless parts or something?





I think I want synthetic with a SS barrel 18.5"  I think that would be great for my needs and wants.



The "All Weather" means SS barrel and synthetic stock.





 
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 11:57:46 AM EDT
[#26]
Quoted:
What are the "All Weather" models?  Do they have more stainless parts or something?

I think I want synthetic with a SS barrel 18.5"  I think that would be great for my needs and wants.


NO, only the barrel and plastic stock.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:23:16 PM EDT
[#27]
How much would a 18.5" SS barel and the synthetic stock cost at a later date if I was to get a wood blued model now?
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:28:59 PM EDT
[#28]
Walmart used to be the best place around to buy a new one.......not sure if there are any stores left that still sell rifles anymore though.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:32:07 PM EDT
[#29]
Http://www.tech-sights.com/index3.htm makes some nice irons.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:32:55 PM EDT
[#30]
I found a lightly-used 10/22 for $120 a couple of years back, sold the barrel and stock, added a Hogue overmolded stock and a Green Mountain 16.1" fluted SS .920 barrel + a VQ hammer and scope rail.  All said and done under $400 for a tack driving, choose-the-eyeball-of -the-squirrel hunting, lightweight and bombproof field gun.

Don't shoot it much anymore since getting a dedicated .22LR AR upper, though.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:47:04 PM EDT
[#31]
Mine had to have an aftermarket extractor because it couldn't shoot five rounds without jamming. After I replaced that it runs fine.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 12:55:11 PM EDT
[#32]
Quoted:

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:08:20 PM EDT
[#33]
Quoted:
Quoted:

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!



I thought the 10/22 was a pretty reliable .22lr rifle?  Would you suggest something different?
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:13:45 PM EDT
[#34]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!



I thought the 10/22 was a pretty reliable .22lr rifle?  Would you suggest something different?


They are plenty reliable. Mine certainly doesn't jam (maybe had 4 stove pipes while breaking it in and that is about it). Use good mags and decent ammo and it should run perfectly fine. You can always put a new extractor + spring in there and really throw the spent cases out with some power, i'm fine with just the factory ones, I just replaced the factory hammer, sear, and filed down that nub on the bolt release, oh and a rubber bolt buffer thingy.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:15:12 PM EDT
[#35]
They're pretty accurate. get the most basic one you can find. probably 180 or 200 bucks now. then do shit to it, thats the fun of having a 10/22
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:22:17 PM EDT
[#36]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!



I thought the 10/22 was a pretty reliable .22lr rifle?  Would you suggest something different?


While they are reliable IMO some of them are picky towards ammo. One of mine will choke on Remington Golden Bullet ammo, I'm lucky if a round even chambers. Everything else I've tried works just fine.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:25:07 PM EDT
[#37]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
I would buy a cheap one, since you are probably going to customize it anyway.


First post nails it once again.

If you spend more than $200 on a 10/22, you got ripped off. Check Dick's as they used to have great prices. Don't waste your time at their site online however.

Go here to get a better feel for what is out there: Rimfire Central





I'm also looking to pick one up and I've been to three gun stores in the area, including Dicks, and the cheapest was new 10/22 was about $230.  


We have members here who like to base today's prices on what they paid several years ago.


I bought another 10/22 new from a dealer for $179 less than a month ago. Look around and you will find one decently priced. DO NOT buy a new 10/22 on gunbroker unless it is less than $200.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:28:11 PM EDT
[#38]
Quoted:
Quoted:
The new 10/22 have a plastic trigger.

See if you can find one used as cheap as possible. Parts are cheap.  I have one from 86 it is nice. I added a different hammer I think that cut the trigger pull weight down. the newer plastic trigger groups are not as nice and easy to tune.

green mountain has good barrels but they have a bunch of military contracts now so they haven' t been making 10/22 barrels.

If you have the cash build a .22 AR. spikes has bolts and barrels in stock but you are talking alot more cash. I understand all the liberty training rifle stuff. but I would rather shoot an ar than a 10/22 with tec sights.

But in the arfcom tradition I have  both. I use my 10/22 mostly for hunting it is setup for early season squirrel 60 yard and uinder shots.







I went to buy one a few months ago. I picked it up, saw that, gave a put it back on the counter and out of my mind forever.


I've put thousands of rounds through my 10/22 with no problems from any of the plastic parts.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:30:03 PM EDT
[#39]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.


10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!



I thought the 10/22 was a pretty reliable .22lr rifle?  Would you suggest something different?


They are reliable but they are picky eaters. You have to try many different brands to see which round is the most accurate and most reliable in your rifle. For example, mine HATES Federal American Eagle even though other people have reported good results with it in their 10/22s. Remington Golden Bullets also don't work too well in mine, but that's just cause Golden Bullets are shitty ammo.
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 1:37:01 PM EDT
[#40]
I bought mine brand-new-in-the-box almost 35 years ago.  My first gun!

It has been a joy to shoot all these years.  All my kids have shoot it and now the grandkids are getting trigger time with it.

I have found that it will feed any ammo I feed it.  It has never let me down.  The only things I have done to mine is change the stock (Butler Creek folding) and added a scope.

Get one!   You will not regret it!  



Link Posted: 5/3/2009 2:17:02 PM EDT
[#41]



Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:



I'm looking for a rifle that will last me a long time, be durable and reliable.




10/22s are quite reliable.  You can rely on them to jam quite regularly!






I thought the 10/22 was a pretty reliable .22lr rifle?  Would you suggest something different?
The one I had for like three weeks was perfectly reliable.



It just wasn't accurate. I sold it last week for $200.




Meh. By the time you're done, you'll have $500 - $600 in it, including price of the rifle. What's the point? I bought a Remington Tech Target M597 for $329 from Dicks and all I did was put a VQ hammer on it; it's what the 10-22 should have been from the word "go."





 
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 2:33:48 PM EDT
[#42]
I picked up a 10/22 with a scope from Bas Pro 2 years ago for 225 OTD
Link Posted: 5/3/2009 2:38:48 PM EDT
[#43]
http://www.ar15.com/forums/forum.html?b=6&f=11  

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=11&t=275758  

You may be able to find an economical one at some Wal-Marts (the very few that may still sell rifles) and Cabela's sometimes puts them on sale, or Academy.  
Typical going price is $239 for birch stock with s/s bbl.; or the full camo version.  On sale @ $210 April09.  
16"-18" barrels tend to get the most velocity.  Factory bbls. may shoot great or a little tweaking might be desired later.  New GM bbls can be had for $105+
The base model is fine for starting out on; especially if you plan on modifying it later.  
Lighter is better for hunting as opposed to a heavy bull barrel.
You can spend as much as you want to put into 10/22s
See the above links for more info.  Great guns regardless.  

Another option is the  CZ452, some of the Marlins, and Savage has a nice one also.

Link Posted: 5/3/2009 4:52:07 PM EDT
[#44]



The Appleseed allows you to shoot an AR15, AK47, SKS, or other rifle you have.
I want to learn to shoot and it looks like it will be great fun.


Yeah I have been to a few. It is fun.



Don't stress out about it too much. I shot my first appleseed with a single shot Winchester 67. I survived fine. Almost made it though the rapid fires too. I think I was slow a shot or two. It wasn't ideal for scoring rifleman but I still had a blast and learned a bunch. Especially having to get back to the same point of aim after each shot.



If you can find a used 10/22 that is your best bet.



If not just get a new one and don't worry about it. the trigger etc will make it better. but it doesn't mean you won't have fun with it.



The .22 AR stuff wasn't that available when I got my 10/22 if it was I probably would have gone that route instead. But it doesn't seem like you want to drop that much money on a .22. But just add up all the costs of the 10/22 with new barrel tech sites etc and price out a .22 AR and see if they are close enough to make it worth just putting together an ar. It probably will cost too much to go the ar route if money is tight.





I know my .22 are going to see a lot more range time than any of my other guns this summer if ammo doesn't become more available.





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