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Posted: 5/20/2005 4:29:13 AM EDT
OK, let me try and explain this and see if someone can figure it out and give me some advice.

I have never noticed any signs of leaking or water infiltration in our roof before. I was just up in the attic the other day after some rain and nothing.

Last night, we had torrential rains (not a lot of wind at all, but HEAVY rain - about 3 inches inside of 4 hours). I got up in the attic this morning and in one place, high up near the top of where the roof angles meet (actually about 1/3 of the way up), under one of the rafters, there was a lot of moisture soaking into one of the planks of plywood. Not so much that it was dripping or anything, but about a 3x3 foot section around the rafter joist.

So, is it possible that this will only happen in very heavy rain? Is there a solution that doesn't involve replacing the whole roof? Everything else everywhere is dry with no sign of moisture. There is no flashing anywhere near where this is occurring.

Is it possible that I have loose shingles, that water was blown up or infiltrated in this one place?

Link Posted: 5/20/2005 4:54:51 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 5:01:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ikor:
Under such heavy rain conditions, it is not uncommon to have water back up in a roof "valley" due, maybe, to leaves and such that have accumulated there that block the flow. Normally, this blockage is not a big deal since water will eventually flow down through it, but when the heavy water comes, that lack of rapid drainage can cause water to back up and eventually find its way underneath your shingles if there is a spot or two that has a less than perfect seal. Valleys and flashings are, of course, the weak areas of the roof where water intrusion is concerned.

Remember, that water may not be coming in where you see the wet spot on the sheathing...it can enter at a higher spot and flow under gravity. If your sheathing is plywood and not OSB, you are probably OK once the water dries, but you still need to find the source of that water, and...maybe...blow the leaves off your roof and make certain any gutters are cleaned out well, etc. A little judiciously applied "blackjack" sealer may get you by for a while, but I would have it looked at by someone who knows what to look for and, if possible, who is not going ti try and sell you a new roof if you don't need one yet.

Good Luck!




Thanks, Ikor - we aren't planning on staying in this house more than 1 or 2 more years at the most - I just put new windows, siding, carpet, and a bathroom in and don't want to have to spend any more money than I have to. We have no gutters, so that isn't an issue. One thing I have noticed in the past when I was up on the roof was clumps of . . . vegetation? Algae? Almost like green sod under or between some of the shingles. Perhaps this may be causing some of these issues.

And the house was unoccupied for a year before we bought it, and was a rental before that, so you know it probably wasn't maintained properly. There was a LOT of pine needles on the roof for a long time.

Link Posted: 5/20/2005 5:09:46 AM EDT
Get some Blackjack and do a visual opf the roof. SOmetimee nails pop out and punch through the shingle, comprimising the roof. Like the above poster said thoug, look up the roof higher as the water will leak downward and appear to be leaking at a different spot. I had the same problem. I pu a new roof up about 4 years ago. I used 5,500 sq/ft of GAF Architectual 45 year shingle. Not on problem for years. We had a monsoon on night, and low and behold, I had a leak by some copper flashing. A little Blackjack and some flashing and I was good to go
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 5:41:58 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/20/2005 8:17:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greywolf2112:
One thing I have noticed in the past when I was up on the roof was clumps of . . . vegetation? Algae? Almost like green sod under or between some of the shingles. Perhaps this may be causing some of these issues.

And the house was unoccupied for a year before we bought it, and was a rental before that, so you know it probably wasn't maintained properly. There was a LOT of pine needles on the roof for a long time.


I am going to guess from the pine needles that the house is shaded by a lot of trees.

From that, I am going to guess that the green stuff is moss. It's common in the Seattle area; roofs can get so bad, with huge clumps of dead moss covered by masses of green moss, that it looks like the house has been roofed over with dirt.

In the Seattle area in springtime, you can buy moss-killing powder everywhere. It doesn't do such a good job when the stuff is already heavily established, though. IIRC, copper kills it, and some people string copper wire over their roofs to leach in the rain.

You'll probably have to go up and scrape the stuff loose. Don't damage the shingles, and don't break your neck. The alternative is a roof replacement before you sell.
Link Posted: 5/21/2005 5:28:33 AM EDT
OK, I'm still alive! I found out what it was. Seems a nail (not a shingle nail, but a 2" roofing nail used to secure the plywood to the rafters) worked it's way out and was about .75" up - so the water was getting in that way.

I pulled it out and am letting it all dry out, and then I'll patch it up with some waterproof roofing goop.
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