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Posted: 10/6/2014 4:58:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2014 5:14:50 PM EST by jasonusvi]
Replacing underground heating oil tank... basement or external for the new tank? 275 or 330?

Approx 1800sqft house with 1100 unfinished basement.

Are there positives and negatives for the options or a clear better solution?
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:17:07 PM EST
Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Replacing underground heating oil tank... basement or external for the new tank? 275 or 330?

Approx 1800sqft house with 1100 unfinished basement.

Are there positives and negatives for the options or a clear better solution?
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Leave the tank outside that way if it is overfill or starts leaking your basement is not fuck up.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:19:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2014 5:20:45 PM EST by jasonusvi]
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:



Leave the tank outside that way if it is overfill or starts leaking your basement is not fuck up.
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Replacing underground heating oil tank... basement or external for the new tank? 275 or 330?

Approx 1800sqft house with 1100 unfinished basement.

Are there positives and negatives for the options or a clear better solution?



Leave the tank outside that way if it is overfill or starts leaking your basement is not fuck up.


How about basement with an external fill spout? Read that external exposure will reduce the life of a tank.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:24:09 PM EST
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:


How about basement with an external fill spout? Read that external exposure will reduce the life of a tank.
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Replacing underground heating oil tank... basement or external for the new tank? 275 or 330?

Approx 1800sqft house with 1100 unfinished basement.

Are there positives and negatives for the options or a clear better solution?



Leave the tank outside that way if it is overfill or starts leaking your basement is not fuck up.


How about basement with an external fill spout? Read that external exposure will reduce the life of a tank.


If for some reason the tank in the basement leaks or ruptures the guy filling the tank can get a full tanker truck worth in the basement before he runs
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:26:56 PM EST
^^^ That would be a shitty situation. Clear upside to keeping fuel outside. Do you have to heat an external tank?
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:33:15 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2014 5:33:56 PM EST by Avidrook]
I would recommend underground, outside. Personally I would never put one in my basement.

No heating is not required.

ETA: But then I have no idea where you live

Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:36:50 PM EST
do they make fiberglass tanks?
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:45:16 PM EST
Make sure you find the regs for your state regarding UST's (underground storage tanks). The regs have been tightened up dramatically in the last few years. You also may have liability issues if your existing tank is leaking.

Any way to conver to gas?
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:45:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Avidrook:
I would recommend underground, outside. Personally I would never put one in my basement.

No heating is not required.

ETA: But then I have no idea where you live

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North East
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:46:27 PM EST
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Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
Make sure you find the regs for your state regarding UST's (underground storage tanks). The regs have been tightened up dramatically in the last few years. You also may have liability issues if your existing tank is leaking.

Any way to conver to gas?
View Quote


Unfortunately no nat gas service in the area yet.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:48:01 PM EST
Your state and local government is seriously messed up if you don't have natural gas.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:49:49 PM EST
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:

North East
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Originally Posted By Avidrook:
I would recommend underground, outside. Personally I would never put one in my basement.

No heating is not required.

ETA: But then I have no idea where you live


North East


Inside

Gelling of the fuel line does happen, and sucks
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:50:06 PM EST
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:


Unfortunately no nat gas service in the area yet.
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Originally Posted By jasonusvi:
Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
Make sure you find the regs for your state regarding UST's (underground storage tanks). The regs have been tightened up dramatically in the last few years. You also may have liability issues if your existing tank is leaking.

Any way to conver to gas?


Unfortunately no nat gas service in the area yet.


That being the case, check out propane.

UST's can be huge issue, especially oil.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:50:50 PM EST
Fuck underground.......I'm in the middle of having an underground 500 tank removed and certified what a fuxkjng nightmare.

I replaced it with an outside (under my deck) 330.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:51:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2014 5:52:03 PM EST by Mds238]
My son had a stainless steel, double walled tank installed at his house a few years ago.
It's outside, it's not ugly and I guess will it will outlast him.

This is on Long Island.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:54:26 PM EST
One downside to an outdoor tank in the NE is the possibility of freeze ups during very cold weather. Need to add kerosene to prevent that. Another downside you alluded to , reduced service life of the tank. Some folks think the tank is ugly on the outside.

Another thought is depending on your exact circumstance, security could be an issue. Fuel oil is expensive and I know folks who have had their tank pumped out by thieves while they were away.

Mine is in the garage, which works very well for my situation.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:58:30 PM EST
get the bigger tank, that way you can fill it when prices are down in the summer months. Hell, if I had the space I would have 2- 330s.

If you decide to go outside you can build an enclosure around it to protect it from the elements.

If gelling becomes an issue just throw a 12 ounce bottle of hot shot in with every fill up.

You can insulate the enclosure as well (if you go that route).

I moved my tank outside a few years ago, built an enclosure insulated with 2" rigid foam and have not had gelling problems.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 6:06:46 PM EST
As others have already said...do not put one in your basement. Personally, I would put an above ground one in. Make sure it's at least 12 guage steel and that it doesn't sit directly on the ground. Keep it painted and you shouldn't have to worry about rust. If you do have issues, you will see them faster than if it was underground.

I know for a fact that in my area, there have been a couple of instances where basement tanks caused serious problems for the homeowners and for the oil company. One a few years back was the homeowner replaced the oil furnace with a heat pump and evidently the oil company didn't get the message. They were on automatic fill, so the oil truck shows up and proceeds to fill the tank through the outside fill port (which was still there). After pumping over 300 gallons for a 275 gallon tank, the driver figured there might be a problem.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 7:05:13 PM EST
Thanks guys. Think I will go with 330 external and get an enclosure to protect against elements.
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