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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/29/2005 3:45:38 PM EDT
Back when I was a kid growing up in south Louisiana there were oak trees with white painted trunks in most yards and around buildings. It seemed to me that anywhere people lived; especially out in the country, the trees had the trunks whitewashed or painted white. The practice started to fade away as I grew older and moved away. I don't know it this was done anywhere else in the country or not.

Why was it done and why did it stop?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:46:59 PM EDT
Still here on many trees.


Supposedly it reduces sun damage to the tree's trunk; I don't know if that's true or not though.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:48:43 PM EDT
Wow...Never knew that was done in the south as well...
Learn something new everyday....
I alawys though it was only the Italians and Portuguese folks up here that did it...very decorative types (I happen to be one...so I am not being racist)
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:55:15 PM EDT
You mean they don't grow that way?
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 3:56:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 3:57:18 PM EDT by Alien]
I always thought they painted them like that to prevent branches from growing down that low or something to do with growth of the tree.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:05:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Pangea:
Back when I was a kid growing up in south Louisiana there were oak trees with white painted trunks in most yards and around buildings. It seemed to me that anywhere people lived; especially out in the country, the trees had the trunks whitewashed or painted white. The practice started to fade away as I grew older and moved away. I don't know it this was done anywhere else in the country or not.

Why was it done and why did it stop?



hey brother - nowadays you see it more on fruit trees to keep rabbits from girding a tree - nibbling all the bark off all the way around. If down to the cambium, it will kill the tree.

inthe old days 25 years ago, it was part of a package landscaping/tree trimming service that showed the rest of the neighborhood you paid someone to groom your trees.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:08:13 PM EDT
It means there's an Army base nearby........
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:24:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By prk:
It means there's an Army base nearby........



If ya can't pick it up...
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:42:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/29/2005 4:46:23 PM EDT by LoginName]

Originally Posted By prk:
It means there's an Army base nearby........



Not far off.

When I was an E-5 stationed at FT. Bragg back in the mid/late 70's, I had it out with another E-5 who was junior to me (we had had it in for each other ever since he rotated in as an E-4. When he got promoted I was his Sgt. Elias and he was my Sgt. Barnes).

One day he took it upon himself to have his guys whitewash the trunks of the oak trees that grew in between our barracks. It looked like shit and when I saw it I flipped out and dressed the guy down in front of our platoon (bad judgement on my part, but I was getting to be a short timer and I really had had enough of this guy).

His excuse was that it was "to prevent a bunch of drunks from driving into the trees".

To make a long story short, we both ended up in front of the 1st Sgt and he chewed both our asses out.

Me for dissing the ass in front of the enlisted men, and him for painting the trees without authorization.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:50:50 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 4:51:20 PM EDT
Many years ago, my grandfather told me it was because trees were splitting their bark.

The thought was that trees in the woods had brush and other trees to shield their bark
from direct sunlight. As people cut down trees and built houses, the bark became exposed
and didn't like the direct sunlight. People painted them white to reflect the light.

I have also heard that trees that grew up without anything shading their trunks
didn't suffer the way trees that were already grown did, which may explain why
the practice is fading. Or, it could be it really did nothing to protect them.

I went to a college that used to mow around all of their trees, like you would expect.

Until I started going, and they stopped mowing within 10 feet of all the trees.

The story I heard was that old trees started dying, and a biology professor said it was
likely due to the mowing. (I say bullshit, but I'm not a biologist)

Regardless, now with tall growth on campus, the biology students actually have stuff to
study other than Kentucky Bluegrass. Now they have poison ivy, and dandilions, and
all kinds of thorny bushes. Dumbasses. At least the rabbits and squirrels have a place
to hide.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 10:05:51 PM EDT
When I was a kid in Columbus, Ohio all of the old people in my neighborhood had trees like that. Someone told me it was some kind of anti bug stuff that stopped insects that would damage the tree.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 10:29:55 PM EDT
Primary reason - to keep people from hitting them at 60mph.

When people got tired of having drivers kill or maim themselves while negotiating the road in front of their houses, they started painting the trunks white so idiot, drunk and/or female drivers could see them and swerve out of the way of the oncoming tree.

Then the neighbors, who were clueless, liked it. So they did it too, even though they did not have trees close to the road or in a place where the drivers might take a shot at them.

That is all
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 10:34:39 PM EDT
Wow, I had totally forgotten about that!

Plamore, I don't believe you're Italian. I need pics.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 10:38:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SUPERSPORT:
When I was a kid in Columbus, Ohio all of the old people in my neighborhood had trees like that. Someone told me it was some kind of anti bug stuff that stopped insects that would damage the tree.

I always thought it was some type of anti insect sort of thing.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 10:42:21 PM EDT
Now that I think about it I have seen a few painted trees. I have no idea why, never really noticed such a thing.
Link Posted: 9/29/2005 11:20:34 PM EDT
On PBS some time back, I think on one of those living history shows like "Colonial House" or whatever, it was mentioned that in Victorian England the bottoms of trees were painted so as to present a more "modest" appearance. Much the same reason as why table clothes were made long enough to cover the legs of tables during the time. No kidding. It was so god-damn dumb I clearly remember this. As to the U.S., the painting probably spread, and maybe was shown to have some uses at times, such as the aforementioned drunk driver idea earlier.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 2:03:06 AM EDT
I knew of a huge apple tree that had its trunk painted white. I never understood why; I just accepted it as a norm.
The tree was close to our garage (which was separate from the house), but was still set back several feet away from the driveway.
I never knew why. The tree has since been cut down for several years now.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 2:13:47 AM EDT
I've heard many of the reasons that have been posted here. All seem fairly logical in one way or another. It's one of those odd things that I kind of miss....
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 3:13:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By desertmoon:
I've heard many of the reasons that have been posted here. All seem fairly logical in one way or another. It's one of those odd things that I kind of miss....



Dude...Start a campaign..."Paint the trees...do it for the________________"




Blammo
, your search fu is weak!
PlayMore HAS posted pics!
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 3:26:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Originally Posted By desertmoon:
I've heard many of the reasons that have been posted here. All seem fairly logical in one way or another. It's one of those odd things that I kind of miss....



Dude...Start a campaign..."Paint the trees...do it for the________________"




Blammo
, your search fu is weak!
PlayMore HAS posted pics!



Nice
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 3:33:31 AM EDT
If you see a tree with a black ring around it, that's to keep beetles from harming the tree by climbing past that point and attacking the softer branches and leaves. Doesn't always work though.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 6:39:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Blammo
, your search fu is weak!
PlayMore HAS posted pics!



Trust me, my search fu is quite healthy. Perhaps I should've said "more pics".
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 6:43:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
If you see a tree with a black ring around it, that's to keep beetles from harming the tree by climbing past that point and attacking the softer branches and leaves. Doesn't always work though.



Now there's something else I had forgotten. Back in Texas in the 60's & 70's, every pecan tree in the neighborhood had the black goo around the trunk to trap web worms. Come to think of it, I haven't even seen a web worm infested tree in years.
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 6:50:05 AM EDT
"I am the Lorax, I speak for the trees."
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 7:06:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
If you see a tree with a black ring around it, that's to keep beetles from harming the tree by climbing past that point and attacking the softer branches and leaves. Doesn't always work though.



Simple black paint or a compound??/ I'm curious...we have waaaaaaaaaaaay too many beetles!
Link Posted: 9/30/2005 7:07:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BlammO:

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Blammo
, your search fu is weak!
PlayMore HAS posted pics!



Trust me, my search fu is quite healthy. Perhaps I should've said "more pics".



To prove my ethnicity???hmm...next time I make lasagna I'll post...although I doubt then you'll be lookin' at me...you'll be droolin' over my lasagna!
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