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Posted: 10/26/2013 9:18:27 AM EST
At least the Space Shuttle 747 will be stripped and then put on display.

Thanks Obama.

Reuse, Recycle: SOFIA Obtains Spare Parts from Government Surplus 747s
http://www.sofia.usra.edu/News/news_2013/09_24_13/index.html





Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:21:26 AM EST
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:22:38 AM EST
I was actually hoping it would be turned into a E-4C
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:34:08 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:37:41 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Baker556:
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?
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Yeah, I thought I heard they were adapting it for protecting carrier groups and such.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:39:07 AM EST
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Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

Yeah, I thought I heard they were adapting it for protecting carrier groups and such.
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Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Originally Posted By Baker556:
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?

Yeah, I thought I heard they were adapting it for protecting carrier groups and such.


wrong laser.

liquid based single shot lazers that require a 747 to get off the ground don't have a lot of application.

in anything.

ABL was a horrible waste of money.

but, it justified a new airplane.

we'll call it a win.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:47:06 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:


wrong laser.

liquid based single shot lazers that require a 747 to get off the ground don't have a lot of application.

in anything.

ABL was a horrible waste of money.

but, it justified a new airplane.

we'll call it a win.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Originally Posted By Baker556:
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?

Yeah, I thought I heard they were adapting it for protecting carrier groups and such.


wrong laser.

liquid based single shot lazers that require a 747 to get off the ground don't have a lot of application.

in anything.

ABL was a horrible waste of money.

but, it justified a new airplane.

we'll call it a win.


There's a reason why it's called the YAL-1.
Production ready is not one of them.
It was a flying test bed.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:48:05 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:


wrong laser.

liquid based single shot lazers that require a 747 to get off the ground don't have a lot of application.

in anything.

ABL was a horrible waste of money.

but, it justified a new airplane.

we'll call it a win.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Originally Posted By Baker556:
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?

Yeah, I thought I heard they were adapting it for protecting carrier groups and such.


wrong laser.

liquid based single shot lazers that require a 747 to get off the ground don't have a lot of application.

in anything.

ABL was a horrible waste of money.

but, it justified a new airplane.

we'll call it a win.

LOL
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 9:49:17 AM EST
wrong test bed.

the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.

just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:02:57 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
wrong test bed.
the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.
just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.
View Quote


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:04:12 AM EST
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Originally Posted By KA3B:


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?
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Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
wrong test bed.
the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.
just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?


Nothing that was worth the cost involved.

And arguably nothing that couldn't have been learned with a ground test bed.

so, we did the test bed.

where are we going with the technology?
Nowhere.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:05:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:06:00 AM EST by Chairborne]
Tremendous waste of two brand new 747-400Fs. I'm surprised they aren't removing the systems and selling them to a cargo carrier.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:07:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:


Nothing that was worth the cost involved.

And arguably nothing that couldn't have been learned with a ground test bed.

so, we did the test bed.

where are we going with the technology?
Nowhere.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
wrong test bed.
the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.
just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?


Nothing that was worth the cost involved.

And arguably nothing that couldn't have been learned with a ground test bed.

so, we did the test bed.

where are we going with the technology?
Nowhere.

There are always little hidden nuggets from research we think was completely wasted.

A number of things from the STI has bared fruits.

This did seem like a waste of money tho. A fucking giant laser on an airplane sounds like a mad scientist's idea.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:08:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:10:01 AM EST by Chairborne]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:

There are always little hidden nuggets from research we think was completely wasted.

A number of things from the STI has bared fruits.

This did seem like a waste of money tho. A fucking giant laser on an airplane sounds like a mad scientist's idea.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
wrong test bed.
the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.
just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?


Nothing that was worth the cost involved.

And arguably nothing that couldn't have been learned with a ground test bed.

so, we did the test bed.

where are we going with the technology?
Nowhere.

There are always little hidden nuggets from research we think was completely wasted.

A number of things from the STI has bared fruits.

This did seem like a waste of money tho. A fucking giant laser on an airplane sounds like a mad scientist's idea.


Except that...it worked. We also learned a hell of a lot about beam combining and steering, using adaptive optics for sensing, beam shaping, and control, and plenty more.


ETA: nobody thought we learned anything from Comanche until the bin laden raid, either.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:10:10 AM EST
I worked on the ABL in Wichita.

It's amazing the way we waste money.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:12:10 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Baker556:
Hasn't this evolved into a ground-based platform now?
View Quote

I keep having this suspicion that there's something like this on the F-22 and F-35.

I have absolutely no evidence, it's really just a fantasy, I guess.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:22:04 AM EST
954 Hours on a 747 is *nothing* compared the life a commercial carrier gets with one of those airframes.

Our tax dollars at work...

-Gator
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:24:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:24:59 AM EST by Bubbatheredneck]


Use two mothballed 747's for parts to keep a third one flying?

Not seeing the problem unless the street value for the plane is more than the parts value

You can't have one of 'everything' on static display somewhere.


Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:24:26 AM EST
FBHO
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:26:13 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chairborne:


Except that...it worked. We also learned a hell of a lot about beam combining and steering, using adaptive optics for sensing, beam shaping, and control, and plenty more.


ETA: nobody thought we learned anything from Comanche until the bin laden raid, either.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Chairborne:
Originally Posted By ArmyInfantryVet:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
Originally Posted By KA3B:
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
wrong test bed.
the laser had no application. putting it in an airplane changed nothing.
just squandered billions of dollars so AF could play BMD.


So you think that nothing was learned from the YAL-1?


Nothing that was worth the cost involved.

And arguably nothing that couldn't have been learned with a ground test bed.

so, we did the test bed.

where are we going with the technology?
Nowhere.

There are always little hidden nuggets from research we think was completely wasted.

A number of things from the STI has bared fruits.

This did seem like a waste of money tho. A fucking giant laser on an airplane sounds like a mad scientist's idea.


Except that...it worked. We also learned a hell of a lot about beam combining and steering, using adaptive optics for sensing, beam shaping, and control, and plenty more.


ETA: nobody thought we learned anything from Comanche until the bin laden raid, either.


nothing you mentioned couldn't be done on a ground test bed.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:35:08 AM EST


You can't simulate actual atmospheric conditions at 10k, 20k, 30k feet on the ground. You also can't induce relative motion between laser carrier and target of hundreds of not thousands of MPH. Chemical lasers were never going to be the answer, but with the advances made in solid state lasers lately we will see a laser equipped AC-130 very soon. Most of the technology used will be derived from the ABL program, among other places. DoD "lost" $2T in unaccounted for cash in Iraq, I'd rather our money go towards r&d than into some fucking despots bank account, personally.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:36:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 10:38:25 AM EST by Accidental]
What happened to the 135 that was the test bed before this was the test bed?

ETA -
Since 1984 NKC-135 Airborne Laser Lab has been on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. In August 2011 it was removed from display in the Museum's Air Park to make room for the arrival of the Museum's C-5A Galaxy. The Museum is currently attempting to locate a new home for the aircraft, otherwise the aircraft will likely be scrapped.
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Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:41:50 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Accidental:
What happened to the 135 that was the test bed before this was the test bed?

ETA -

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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Accidental:
What happened to the 135 that was the test bed before this was the test bed?

ETA -
Since 1984 NKC-135 Airborne Laser Lab has been on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. In August 2011 it was removed from display in the Museum's Air Park to make room for the arrival of the Museum's C-5A Galaxy. The Museum is currently attempting to locate a new home for the aircraft, otherwise the aircraft will likely be scrapped.




dat old school.
we new school.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 10:45:32 AM EST
Meh- solid state interceptors seem to be coming along nicely. "LAE-SERS" and other electrically powered weapons like the rail gun all seem to be hitting snags other than funding.

Link Posted: 10/26/2013 11:00:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 11:01:28 AM EST by David45]
The Navy seems to have succeeded with it's approach to missile defense.

Even the Army has something to bring to the table.

I wonder why the AF bothered with the laser instead of missiles. There was a feasibility study done years ago about launching a Patriot from fighter aircraft.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 11:03:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By David45:
The Navy seems to have succeeded with it's approach to missile defense.

Even the Army has something to bring to the table.

I wonder why the AF bothered with the laser instead of missiles. There was a feasibility study done years ago about launching a Patriot from fighter aircraft.
View Quote


Directed energy weapons are the future, like it or not. How far in the future only time will tell.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 11:29:31 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Powelligator:
954 Hours on a 747 is *nothing* compared the life a commercial carrier gets with one of those airframes.

Our tax dollars at work...

-Gator
View Quote


Speaking of low time 747s, I heard that they're starting procurement actions to buy two 747-800s to replace the existing AF-1 birds. The YAL-1 is definitely the lowest time, 15 year old 747 in the world. But the two AF-1 747s have got to be considered extremely low flight hour birds themselves. And now they're being considered for replacement with new, larger aircraft.

Not because they're way too old and noisy like the 707 AF-1s were, but probably so Zero can carry a bigger posse with him as he racks up flying time on the taxpayer's dime.
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 11:47:32 AM EST
I wonder how contaminated those airframes are...

They were carrying around some nasty shit.
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