Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 11/19/2012 1:50:03 AM EST
Pics from a bike ride down the trail. Pretty interesting.

Relic Pics

Article about the ride
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:06:07 AM EST
Thanks. Those are fascinating photos. I'm not sure I'd use a bomb as a bell.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:07:03 AM EST
Originally Posted By 7:
Thanks. Those are fascinating photos. I'm not sure I'd use a bomb as a bell.


Thanks for posting these. How about using an artillery shell for a blacksmith's anvil?
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:24:25 AM EST
Amazing photos! Thanks for posting that.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:28:38 AM EST
It would be awesome to take that tour.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:29:03 AM EST
Fascinating and eerie at the same time. I just read about Igloo White. It actually worked - well the technology worked. But was very expensive and yet the supply lines were still going, so ultimately was a failure. Not sure how much smiling I would be doing on the tour.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:38:08 AM EST
Pretty cool trek. I'm surprised the old, hot ordnance hasn't been harvested and sold to the Taliban or others.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:42:38 AM EST
"Fucking savages"
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:45:42 AM EST
very cool find
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:52:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By m193:
Pretty cool trek. I'm surprised the old, hot ordnance hasn't been harvested and sold to the Taliban or others.

Most likely it was harvested in the 60's-70's for use by the Viet kong.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:53:19 AM EST
... pretty cool website
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:54:12 AM EST
Amazing photos. Looks like a fun trip. Its interesting to see how some of the scrap is being used today.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 2:57:04 AM EST
"262 meter Bamboo bridge at Ban Along over the Xe Lanong river, the villagers will charge you 20,000 kip to cross, a bargain at any price."

20,000 kip = $2.50
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:16:19 AM EST
Damn, that picture of the rear end/half the Jolly Green..... I'd like to know that story.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:21:18 AM EST
Great links.

"That was a worthy adversary."
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:22:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By m193:
Pretty cool trek. I'm surprised the old, hot ordnance hasn't been harvested and sold to the Taliban or others.


Why would the Taliban go all the way to Laos when Afghanistan is a weapons black market crossroads and the Soviets left plenty of ordnance behind?
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:26:34 AM EST
Holy shit, that's not my cup of tea....using unexploded ordnance for homes and shit!
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:30:11 AM EST
Just sent that to a bunch of buddies who had an intimate relationship with Trail back in the late '60s and early '70s. Good thread, OP.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:32:29 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:35:06 AM EST
He really should mark the location of that F4 engine on a map. Very well could be MIA remains nearby. Lots of guys still missing.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:37:19 AM EST
Just fucking amazing, things like that make me want to go and take the wife unit on a history trip ...
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:37:50 AM EST
Neat!
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:39:39 AM EST
I remember the stories of SF's and LRRPS mining the trail, it took balls to ride thru an active mined area
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:53:13 AM EST
varmint Kong...

I would like to have a couple of old and rusty bombs for garden ornaments. Cool pics
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:53:34 AM EST
I'm sure a lot of the items on display would classify as UXO. I would keep my distance and not juggle it.


Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:54:28 AM EST
Thanks for sharing the link, very cool history to look through in those pics.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:58:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By HUMONGO:
Holy shit, that's not my cup of tea....using unexploded ordnance for homes and shit!


I'd be more worried about coming across a snake crawling through one of those tanks.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 3:58:47 AM EST
Jesus... all that UXO and he's just monkey fucking around with it.... to hell with that.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:11:49 AM EST
Great Read, Thanks
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:12:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By xviperx420:
Jesus... all that UXO and he's just monkey fucking around with it.... to hell with that.


From the article...

"Even today, almost 40 years after the last bomb was dropped, UXO is a deadly legacy of the war and still kills around 200 people a year."
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:14:14 AM EST
It's amazing how much stuff is just sitting around waiting to be found, and how they find alternative uses for all that stuff. Thanks!
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:15:36 AM EST
Interesting! Not long ago I was doing image searches of abandoned/destroyed equipment from the Vietnam war.

Thank you OP.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:22:04 AM EST
Thanks for that link. Really cool.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:26:47 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 4:28:08 AM EST by bmick325]
As an ex- EOD type and Vietnam war buff, I would love to do a tour of "the Trail".

Some of the ordnance they show was REALLY bad news back in the day. Especailly the "Quickstrike" mines (actually MK 36 Destructors) he was posing with in one of the pics. They were acoustic. magnetic influence, and seismic fused. They started out as shallow water naval mines, but someone figured out they worked really well on land too.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:35:27 AM EST
Nice photos. Thanks
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:37:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 4:38:29 AM EST by FDC]
Originally Posted By mgwantob:
He really should mark the location of that F4 engine on a map. Very well could be MIA remains nearby. Lots of guys still missing.



The article is dated August of this year. I would bet they know the area. Still, anyone how anyone at JPAC? Looks like the dude kept good records of his trip.

––––––––––––––––––––––
The name of that province?district? comes up at least once on google in an interesting .gov archive.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:42:36 AM EST
40+ years later and they are using scraps of our old ordnance for housing material. Looks like communism really worked out well for them.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:43:00 AM EST
What spectacularly beautiful country.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:44:37 AM EST
Originally Posted By hellmann9655:
40+ years later and they are using scraps of our old ordnance for housing material. Looks like communism really worked out well for them.


That's as much a characteristic of their rural riverine life style IMO. Those are some pretty remote areas.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:45:35 AM EST
very cool link
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 4:59:18 AM EST


Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:07:06 AM EST
Interesting
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:07:45 AM EST
cool
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:13:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By Cytic:
Originally Posted By 7:
Thanks. Those are fascinating photos. I'm not sure I'd use a bomb as a bell.


Thanks for posting these. How about using an artillery shell for a blacksmith's anvil?


Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:20:51 AM EST
Originally Posted By hellmann9655:
40+ years later and they are using scraps of our old ordnance for housing material. Looks like communism really worked out well for them.


...says the guy in a nation where people in equally remote areas use plywood, blue tarps, and corrugated metal sheets to build their dwellings. Except we call them "rednecks".
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:21:24 AM EST
Pretty cool, and that had to be one hell of a march.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:23:31 AM EST
Thank You very much for this. Having read a ton of work about the trail, to see this, somehow brings it alive. I wish the V.A. would sponsor trips like yours for vets that want to go back. There would be alot of healing.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:26:54 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rogue-Sasquatch:
Originally Posted By hellmann9655:
40+ years later and they are using scraps of our old ordnance for housing material. Looks like communism really worked out well for them.


...says the guy in a nation where people in equally remote areas use plywood, blue tarps, and corrugated metal sheets to build their dwellings. Except we call them "rednecks".


Glad its not a foreign concept to you. It will be so much easier for you to adjust to life after Obama is done with us
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 6:26:35 AM EST
Originally Posted By Orion67:
Thank You very much for this. Having read a ton of work about the trail, to see this, somehow brings it alive. I wish the V.A. would sponsor trips like yours for vets that want to go back. There would be alot of healing.


Has the US officially acknowledge our operations in Laos yet?
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 6:31:23 AM EST
They can build anything out of bamboo
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 7:06:56 AM EST
Nice link OP-thanks for that. I would love to go there and see it.

My BIL was a USAF intel officer. He was assigned to a joint service command at NAS Barbers Point, HI that looked for U.S. MIA remains in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. He worked with a Vietnamese official from Hanoi named Mr. Dik to find those remains based on conducting interviews with locals that had seen U.S. aircraft crash during the war.

He would fly into South Vietnam at an old US airbase, then travel up Hwy 1 through Hue City (still heavily damaged at the time), across the old DMZ, and up into what had been North Vietnam. He said he saw a lot of the heavy labor of road work being done by the women, while the men operated road construction equipment.

On a few occasions, he even stayed in Hanoi at an old hotel. The command would issue MREs for them to eat, as the local food was thought unsafe to eat.

He said that yes, the rats really were as big as cats.

He told me that Hanoi looked like it had been caught in a time-warp. No new growth since the French had pulled out of Indochina. Of course, this was 1989-1992, so maybe things have changed now.

He worked for a USN Admiral, and reported to a US Army Col. that was convinced that American POWs were still alive in SEA and being held captive. My BIL disagreed. He even briefed Gen. Colin Powell at one point when he visited.

They did find the remains of an Air Force captain that had crashed in his F4 (in Laos or Cambodia-can't remember). They found the rubber soles of his flight suit, a captain rank insignia, and a couple of teeth. That's it. The captains teeth were collected, and flown back to the U.S. in a C5 that carried his flag-draped casket.

My wife's son is married to a gal from what used to be called Saigon. She goes back now and again. She's been up north near Keh Sahn. I've seen the pics-very lush country. There are more westerners in the country now that trade has been opened up, and she would often get asked to translate for people once they found out she spoke engrish. The locals are also very interested in what America is like, and will talk to her for as long as she's willing to answer their question.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top