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Posted: 8/8/2007 6:50:40 AM EDT
Anyone have a good one? What all do you put in it?

Thanks
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 6:53:01 AM EDT
I'm interested too, my girls like it for breakfast but the only thing I do is saute a bit of onion in some oil, start the eggs, throw in last nights steamed rice and some green onions and season. Occasionally, I'll throw in some chunks of hot dog or ham if it's handy. I pull it off the heat before the rice gets too dry.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:04:25 AM EDT
Here is my best fried rice:

5 tablespoons peanut oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 small head Napa cabbage, cored and chopped
1 (8-ounce) can straw mushrooms, drained and rinsed
1/2 cup frozen peas, run under cool water for 2 minutes to thaw
1 generous pinch kosher salt
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 pint cooked Jasmine rice pre-cooked (see recipe below)
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 squirts of Magi sauce
Fresh cilantro leaves, for garnish

Put Jasmine rice in pot and rinse and drain. Then fill to cover the rice by about 1/2". Pot over high heat. Add two pinches of salt and four slices of ginger. Bring to a boil. Simmer 10 minutes. Let sit covered for 5 more minutes.

The rice needs to sit for 1 day in the fridge or 1/2 day spread on a platter on the counter. This will dry the rice and make it good for fried rice.

Heat 3 tablespoons of the peanut oil in a wok or large non-stick skillet over medium-high flame. Give the oil a minute to heat up, then add the garlic, ginger, and red pepper flakes; stir-fry for 1 minute until fragrant. Add the cabbage, mushrooms, and peas, stir-fry until the cabbage is wilted and soft, about 8 minutes; season with a nice pinch of salt. Remove the vegetables to a side platter and wipe out the wok.

Put the pan back on the heat and coat with the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil. When the oil is hot, pour the eggs into the center of the pan. Scramble the egg lightly, then let it set without stirring so it stays in big pieces. Fold in the rice and toss with the egg to combined well, breaking up the rice clumps with the back of a spatula. Return the sauteed vegetables to the pan and moisten with the soy sauce and Magi sauce. Toss everything together to heat through and season again with salt. Pour onto platter and garnish with cilantro.

Note: you can add 1 lb of shrimp or beef or pork or chicken to make a one pot meal.

Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:07:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By brassburn:
I'm interested too, my girls like it for breakfast but the only thing I do is saute a bit of onion in some oil, start the eggs, throw in last nights steamed rice and some green onions and season. Occasionally, I'll throw in some chunks of hot dog or ham if it's handy. I pull it off the heat before the rice gets too dry.


i love fried rice, but for breakfast?
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:20:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/8/2007 7:21:17 AM EDT by BaNo]
Use only precooked cold rice.

Heat some oil, any will do, peanut prefered.

Dump in rice, and desired veggies, hit with a few splashes of soysauce.
Once the rice is starting to turn golden brown and your veggies are cooked to your liking.
Make a doughnut shape with the rice, ie exposing the pan in the middle of the rice, crack 1 egg in there and let it almost scramble, when the egg is almost solid, stir the whole thing together and let the egg finish cooking mixed with the rice. Consume.

Also can add any sort of meat you want, preferably precooked. I use deli sliced ham alot.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:37:00 AM EDT
cool, thanks

i did not realize it was so important to use non fresh cooked rice.

TXL
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:37:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
cool, thanks

i did not realize it was so important to use non fresh cooked rice.

TXL


That is the secrete.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:40:41 AM EDT
OS and friggin Tee
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:42:09 AM EDT
Mine is easy compared to the other recipe.

Day old white rice
Sesame Oil
Soy Sauce
Fried egg
Onions
Bell peppers
Sesame seeds
Whatever meat you want

I don't know what portions, I just mix it together until it tastes right.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:45:23 AM EDT
Add some orso to the skillett with a little butter lightly brown , and then add a bag of success rice, some water and whatever other meats onions etc, you'll have a rice a roni style fried rice.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:50:05 AM EDT
what is orso?

and from above, what is magi sauce?

thanks

TXL
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 7:55:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
cool, thanks

i did not realize it was so important to use non fresh cooked rice.

TXL

Yep otherwise you end up with a giant gooey ball of rice egg and veggies.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 8:45:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
what is orso?

and from above, what is magi sauce?

thanks

TXL


Orso is tiny rice shaped, or seed shaped pasta. Adds great texture and taste to fried rice.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 8:50:54 AM EDT
tag for later
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 8:52:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4-AK:

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
what is orso?

and from above, what is magi sauce?

thanks

TXL


Orso is tiny rice shaped, or seed shaped pasta. Adds great texture and taste to fried rice.


AKA bird tongue pasta
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 9:00:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
what is orso?

and from above, what is magi sauce?

thanks

TXL


Orso is a grain in the rice family. It has a slightly harder shell and fries up wonderfully.

Maggi (not magi) is a german liquid seasoning. Basically, a combination of soy sauce and beef boullion with a few other seasonings. It comes in several varieties including an extremely spicy one with a red cap. The original flavor has a yellow cap. I use Maggi to season almost all my soups and veggies. I love the stuff so much that if I get a sudden case of the munchies, I will just take a slice of bread, douse it and munch on that. It is especially wonderful on red cabbage.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 9:02:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:

i love fried rice, but for breakfast?


Very common out here. I suppose it's the heavier Asian influence you can find in California.

I've never in my life seen a grit, so it's somewhat akin to me going to the Alabama HTF and saying "grits? for breakfast?" lol.
Link Posted: 8/8/2007 9:05:28 AM EDT
I haven't had fried rice in a long time , I might have to make some for dinner tonight !
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:45:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PsyWarrior:

Originally Posted By TxLewis:
what is orso?

and from above, what is magi sauce?

thanks

TXL


Orso is a grain in the rice family. It has a slightly harder shell and fries up wonderfully.

Maggi (not magi) is a german liquid seasoning. Basically, a combination of soy sauce and beef boullion with a few other seasonings. It comes in several varieties including an extremely spicy one with a red cap. The original flavor has a yellow cap. I use Maggi to season almost all my soups and veggies. I love the stuff so much that if I get a sudden case of the munchies, I will just take a slice of bread, douse it and munch on that. It is especially wonderful on red cabbage.



Thread resurection,

Does the ORSO need to be cooked before it is added to the fried rice?

Also, made 2 batches so far. They turned out pretty good, one had too much salt, the other too little, so I know how much I need now.

GF liked it too. Still not as good as what I had a JimBeh, but I'll get there.

Thanks to all for your recipies and help.

TXL
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:50:08 AM EDT
Nice recipes, but I prefer my rice steamed with chili on top.



Chili with beans, that is.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:53:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By farscrape:
Nice recipes, but I prefer my rice steamed with chili on top.



Chili with beans, that is.



That's cause you know CHILI HAS BEANS, otherwise, it's a meat sauce.

TXL
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:58:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2007 8:01:43 AM EDT by twonami]
my recipe is:

Scrambled eggs cooked and broken apart in small pieces. cook seperately.
Shrimp pan seared in a hot pan seperately.
Onions caramelised or fresh raw scallion diced on the side.
I like to add fresh peas of thawed. Veggie choice is up to you.

Cold day old rice fried in hot pan of sesame oil and add the peas, eggs, shrimp and onion at this point.
Flavor with soy sauce to taste.
Pan should hot as possible without burning when combining the ingredients
Don't go crazy on the oil.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 7:58:27 AM EDT
Mine is even simpler:

1-2 eggs
day old refrigerated rice (not sure why, but the colder rice cooks better)
pepper flacks
soy sauce
veggies of choice (I usually use whatever is left in my fridge)

-cook eggs until semi done
-cut eggs into strips and then diagonally, then set aside
-throw in veggies and warm them
-throw in rice and fry until warmed
-put in eggs, soy and pepper flacks
-done and enjoy
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:07:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:09:34 AM EDT
I hear McD in Hawaii has SPAM and fried rice on their breakfast menu.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:11:46 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:26:04 AM EDT
Another little tip or two (as I think of them): If you are doing a true stir-fry, in high-temp oil, it is best that all ingredients be as close to room temperature as possible when they are added to the oil, or they will drop the temp of the oil too fast and make the dish greasy. You can find foil packets of fried-rice seasoning in the Oriental-foods department of some grocery stores; they work okay, but usually have a ridiculous sodium content, so be aware. The way I make it, I'll cook the meat first, then remove it from the wok andf do the veggies, adding the hardest ones (carrots) to the pan first, then going hard-to-soft; then remove them, scramble the egg separately, then do the rice till it's getting a nice brown crust going, then throw everything back in. (Some of the softest veggies: bean sprouts, frozen peas, some others-- don't really need to be cooked, just folded in when the dish is warmed back up again.) Damn, now I'm hungry.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 8:58:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ductapeman:
Another little tip or two (as I think of them): If you are doing a true stir-fry, in high-temp oil, it is best that all ingredients be as close to room temperature as possible when they are added to the oil, or they will drop the temp of the oil too fast and make the dish greasy. You can find foil packets of fried-rice seasoning in the Oriental-foods department of some grocery stores; they work okay, but usually have a ridiculous sodium content, so be aware. The way I make it, I'll cook the meat first, then remove it from the wok andf do the veggies, adding the hardest ones (carrots) to the pan first, then going hard-to-soft; then remove them, scramble the egg separately, then do the rice till it's getting a nice brown crust going, then throw everything back in. (Some of the softest veggies: bean sprouts, frozen peas, some others-- don't really need to be cooked, just folded in when the dish is warmed back up again.) Damn, now I'm hungry.


Great tip. I love the fact that I can stir fry just about any kind of left overs I have from previous meals.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 9:34:23 AM EDT
Peas in fried rice?

Might as well make chili without beans.
Link Posted: 8/16/2007 9:34:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By John91498:

Originally Posted By Ductapeman:
Another little tip or two (as I think of them): If you are doing a true stir-fry, in high-temp oil, it is best that all ingredients be as close to room temperature as possible when they are added to the oil, or they will drop the temp of the oil too fast and make the dish greasy. You can find foil packets of fried-rice seasoning in the Oriental-foods department of some grocery stores; they work okay, but usually have a ridiculous sodium content, so be aware. The way I make it, I'll cook the meat first, then remove it from the wok andf do the veggies, adding the hardest ones (carrots) to the pan first, then going hard-to-soft; then remove them, scramble the egg separately, then do the rice till it's getting a nice brown crust going, then throw everything back in. (Some of the softest veggies: bean sprouts, frozen peas, some others-- don't really need to be cooked, just folded in when the dish is warmed back up again.) Damn, now I'm hungry.


Great tip. I love the fact that I can stir fry just about any kind of left overs I have from previous meals.


Tip from the restaurant business: Get your wok as hot as possible (dry) before you put the oil in. Then when the oil starts to smoke, add your rice.
Link Posted: 8/17/2007 8:38:32 AM EDT
I forgot that one, Q3131A, thanks. Get the pan hot enough that a drop of water will bead up and "dance" around the bottom of the pan, as the steam on the underside of the drop keeps the drop itself from contacting the pan-- I could watch that for hours, if it wouldn't mean burning the bottom out of my wok. Then pour the oil in a circle around the wok about a third of the way up from the bottom, so it heats as it rolls down the side. Swirl it a bit to make sure it's evenly heated, then add the rice a bit at a time so it doesn't drop the temp of the oil too fast. The whole thing about this stunt is to keep the oil hot. The rice will begin to brown real fast. I have also sprinkled a small amount of water onto the rice, then tightly covered the pan for no more than sixty seconds-- it breaks up the rice nicely, but tends to make the rice stick to the pan a little.

So nice to have old friends named Chen . . .
Link Posted: 8/17/2007 8:47:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:

Originally Posted By twonami:
I hear McD in Hawaii has SPAM and fried rice on their breakfast menu.


Yup! and portuguese(sp?) sausage!


I've eaten a lot of that myself
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