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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/3/2005 6:33:01 AM EDT
Getting ready to do this for the first time. It's way over due and I'm not sure what I should avoid doing to make the task at hand more difficult than it needs to be.

I figured I would go out with a flat razor blade (like a Widget) and scape off the old caulk, then reapply a new bead. Beyond that I have no clue what I should be doing.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:35:32 AM EDT
Are you talking about glazing, or the caulk around the exterior trim?

If you are talking about the glazing that holds the glass panes in, it is glazing compound not caulk.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:38:33 AM EDT
use paintable silicone if you ever want to paint it. Uese pure silicone if not-but it cannot be painted-ever.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:40:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 6:41:37 AM EDT by mjohn3006]
The new windows disks just boot themselves automagicly.
If it does not work, you have to go into your BIOS settings and make sure your set to boot off you CD drive.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:40:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 6:41:16 AM EDT by TheCynic]
Lady with Boston accent: "I need some caulk"
Hardware store dude: "What kind?"
Lady: "I like all kinds of caulk"
Hardware store dude: "Where are you going to use it?"
Lady: "I like to use the caulk in the bathroom sometimes..."



I love O&A.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 6:41:18 AM EDT
The clear gluelike material to be used here is made for windows, not soft like silicone.

But for this, or bathroom caulking, here is a method I use to get a nice, even, attractive bead.

About 1/4" out from the corner, on both surfaces, lay a strip of painter's tape. Tack it down on one end, stretch out several feet, and lay it down. This way you get a nice straight line.

Then apply the caulk. Use a wet (with water) finger to smooth it if necessary. After the caulk is applied, remove the tape and you have a nice even bead.

Let that area dry, and go to another section to continue work.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 8:23:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By out-a-ammo:
Are you talking about glazing, or the caulk around the exterior trim?

If you are talking about the glazing that holds the glass panes in, it is glazing compound not caulk.




Exterior trim... for weather sealing the windows from the outside.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 8:32:51 AM EDT
If it's just caulk, scrap away the old and put on some new.

If you need to re-glaze your windows, pick up the phone and call a realtor.


My house was built in 1942, and I have been slowly reglazing some of the windows. Lots of work.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 9:18:52 AM EDT
What is reglazing? Not really what I'm looking at doing but you have me wondering about it.

So there's no whiz bank tips or tricks to recaulking... ust strip and reapply fresh bead?

How about keep the caulk from turning into a caulky mess or something?
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 9:27:54 AM EDT
The windows will need to be reglazed. Call a handyman to do this for you. Best option.
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 9:28:05 AM EDT
re-glaze your windows with new windows...
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 9:42:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pathfinder74:
What is reglazing? Not really what I'm looking at doing but you have me wondering about it.

So there's no whiz bank tips or tricks to recaulking... ust strip and reapply fresh bead?

How about keep the caulk from turning into a caulky mess or something?



On older windows, the glass is held in the sash by a stiff, caulk like compound. It is a PITA to remove and redo. Though they do have some that comes in tubes and makes it much quicker.

Most of your old caulk will probably pull out if it is ready to be replaced. Use a good rubber based siding caulk like OSI SBR-100, these will perform the best.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 9:53:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By out-a-ammo:
[On older windows, the glass is held in the sash by a stiff, caulk like compound. It is a PITA to remove and redo. Though they do have some that comes in tubes and makes it much quicker.

Most of your old caulk will probably pull out if it is ready to be replaced. Use a good rubber based siding caulk like OSI SBR-100, these will perform the best.




not true, I had a very easy time one I started useing a hammer
Link Posted: 10/3/2005 10:05:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/3/2005 10:06:17 AM EDT by out-a-ammo]

Originally Posted By MuRDoC:

Originally Posted By out-a-ammo:
[On older windows, the glass is held in the sash by a stiff, caulk like compound. It is a PITA to remove and redo. Though they do have some that comes in tubes and makes it much quicker.

Most of your old caulk will probably pull out if it is ready to be replaced. Use a good rubber based siding caulk like OSI SBR-100, these will perform the best.




not true, I had a very easy time one I started useing a hammer



A heat gun helps, but you have to watch the glass.

Or you could use a "putty chaser" that attaches to your drill.

Link Posted: 10/3/2005 10:28:49 AM EDT
Yeah, no I'm not reglazing anything.

Just doing the caulking weather seal around the frames. Sorry if I confused anyone.
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