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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/4/2005 7:20:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 7:23:03 PM EDT by Corey]
I'm looking for a more upright riding position. I'd prefer something that's a little lighter. It needs to be quick but I don't need anything outrageous.

This would be a first motorcycle. I have extensive pedal cycling experience, so balance is probably not a major concern of mine (I've ridden a few motorcycles, but many years ago). I don't want a beginner bike, but something I can grow into.

I also want a bike that has some personality. Are Buell bikes decent? $10K for a bike at this point isn't cost prohibitive for me (and this purchase might be a year+ out, I'm just starting to research it).

Thanks for your suggestions.

Corey

EDITED to add PS -- it's going to be used on a 15 mile commute. Probably 4 miles on 4 lane highway, 8 miles on 4 lane in town 35-45 mph zoned road, and another 3 miles in town.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:23:00 PM EDT
I have a Triumph i'd like to sell you.

damn good first bike.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:23:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Triumph955i:
I have a Triumph i'd like to sell you.

damn good first bike.



Okay then, I assume you know how this goes.

Pics, spec's and price.



Corey
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:28:34 PM EDT
Kawasaki is going to release the new 650R Ninja next year.
650 V twin.




Kawasaki Introduces New Twin-cylinder Sportbike The 2006 Ninja 650R
Sep 02, 2005

From a press release issued by Kawasaki Motors Corp. U.S.A.:







KAWASAKI’S NINJA® 650R BREAKS NEW GROUND WITH BROAD APPEAL AND INNOVATIVE DESIGN

Unique look and feel grew from specific design team objectives seeking to blend attractiveness with power.

Look at Kawasaki’s all new NINJA® 650R sportbike and the first impression is one of pure design appreciation. Look a little longer and many of the innovative engine and chassis elements begin to come into play. But the entire package doesn’t truly project its intended engineering outcome until the motorcycle is viewed with a rider seemingly melded into its unique posture.

Because the 650R was meant to have broad rider appeal, Kawasaki’s development team began its task with the rider—not the motorcycle. Focusing on all kinds of riders, and all kinds of riding, Kawasaki carefully studied the interface between human and machine. Riding positions were studied to discover which instilled the most confidence.

Narrowing the distance between foot pegs and striving for a lower seat height and low effort controls all played into the design efforts. Ultimately, this exceptionally well-proportioned NINJA 650R represents a genre of motorcycling new to Kawasaki—one that finds itself at home with both novices and experienced riders, and one that will be seen equally in daily midtown commuting situations as well as week-end highway getaways.

A combination of versatility, performance and style, this motorcycle knows no boundaries in terms of rider appeal.

It will be a first-time purchase for some, a second or third motorcycle for others, and for all, it will be fun. Powered by a compact two-cylinder engine mounted in a sleek, lightweight chassis, this extremely maneuverable model will earn its rank as one of the most rider friendly units in today’s marketplace. The very compact liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 649cc Parallel Twin with fuel injection delivers a smooth responsiveness that is tuned for rider-friendly power characteristics—especially in the low and medium rpm ranges that will inspire confidence in new motorcyclists. Its excellent mid-range characteristics will make the 650R a natural for medium speed commuting environments.

And slipping in and out of traffic will be a cinch for this new entry, as its lightweight trellis frame and laydown shock also contribute to its overall compactness.

While the powerplant on this new NINJA is compact, it is anything but minimal in its output. Just gauge the 650R’s roll-on response when making a highway pass and any concerns in that area quickly subside. The engineers called on their vast experience building NINJA supersport machines to develop a motorcycle possessing performance characteristics that will be a match for anything currently available in the middleweight arena, including those with larger displacement.

Some of the engine’s characteristics:

o Triangular layout of the crankshaft and transmission shafts make the engine very short, front-to-back

o The transmission’s input shaft, output shaft, and change drum are contained in a cassette-style package that both works for the 650R’s compact layout, and facilitates transmission maintenance

o Engine height is reduced through the use of a semi-dry sump design

o This new Kawasaki has a plated, linerless aluminum cylinder which is lightweight; its narrow cylinder pitch reduces engine width

o Under-engine muffler improves mass centralization and lowers the 650R center of gravity

Some of the chassis design elements:

o Compact engine design allows use of a slim, minimalist frame, which results in a design that is narrow at the knees and feet

o Light and nimble handling characteristics are one of the benefits of the extremely short wheelbase of this motorcycle

o A long swingarm is used, so both rear suspension and handling are improved

o Engineers used 3-D analysis to achieve the ideal stiffness balance for the frame, which contributes greatly to its handling characteristics

o Frame construction is of high-tensile steel, rivaling the lightness of aluminum frames

o The layout of the offset single-shock rear suspension allows the battery to be located next to the shock rather than beneath it—making for a slim design and lower seat height

Bringing the motorcycle to a stop is handled by triple petal disc brakes that look as good as they perform. And the attractive six-spoke supersport-style wheels give the 650R a “light” look while reducing unsprung weight. This new entry sports a very aggressive headlight design, an aerodynamic windscreen and full fairing, and front turn signals integrated into the faring. The flowing bodywork includes a slim tail cowl with flush-surface tail lamp lens giving the new NINJA 650R a slim, agile appearance from the rear. Also contributing to the slim design appearance is a two-tone seat and a sculpted fuel tank. Instrumentation abounds with this multi-purpose motorcycle. A compact step-motor speedometer features an LCD display with digital readouts for odometer, twin tripmeter, and clock as well as an LED water temperature warning lamp.

Few will look at or ride Kawasaki’s NINJA 650R and fail to come away impressed. Both from a design and a performance benchmark, the team responsible for this new motorcycle has accomplished their stated goal—creating a new category for Kawasaki where every rider, new, old, male, female, experienced or novice—can find a reason to park this one in the garage.

Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:30:40 PM EDT
SV650. Don't get the S. Screw all that plastic stuff.

If it doesn't make the bike go faster, corner harder, or stop quicker, it's airsoft fluff.

Take the MSF courses, wear gear.

The SVX has a fairly upright seating position, not a ton of horsepower, but it has the grunt. If I remember right, it has about 70 HP but about 45 FP of torque. Perfect for traffic.

If you are a fat guy, you will want to have them put heavier shock oil in the forks, and you'll want to crank the preload in the rear. If you aren't a fat guy, eat something.

Don't be tempted to go the Racer Replica route. Pure sport bikes are fun, but too much time ass up and head down makes your hands hurt. Besides, who wants to have their ass higher than their head?

Spend the bucks on gear. Good lid, good jacket, boots, gloves, overpants (not chaps--why would you want your ass and your junk unprotected?) and you are set. Joe Rocket makes mesh jackets and pants that are armored--great for summer, not so good for winter. First Gear makes good stuff.

If it's going to be a year round thing, look into an Aerostich suit. Bout 700 bucks, but waterproof and tough as nails.


GT
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:33:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 7:34:24 PM EDT by Corey]

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Kawasaki is going to release the new 650R Ninja next year.
650 V twin.

roadracingworld.com/images/article/EX650A6F_848481125679820.jpg


....



I don't know shit about bikes, but man that looks like it would fit my bill perfectly!

Cost?

What about Buell? Triumph? Honda?

Corey

EDITED to clip out some of the text of KA3B's post to save space.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:38:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:

What about Buell? Triumph? Honda?

Corey

EDITED to clip out some of the text of KA3B's post to save space.



Buell is of questionable quality. Associated with Hardley Ableson Chrome Tractor Co.

Triumph makes neat stuff (mmmmmmmspeeedtriple...........) but it depends on how available parts/service are in your area. I have a buddy with an MV Augusta F4. The nearest dealership is 150 miles away from where he lives. And it requires FREQUENT mantainence.

Hondas are good stuff. So is Suzuki. Again, I love my SV. No problems with it. Just remember to sit on your intended for a good long time in the dealership.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:55:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 7:57:08 PM EDT by Wingman26]
If you want to ride, you really don't want a Buell, or anything with a Harley engine in it.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 7:58:42 PM EDT
How about a Hayabusa? ...ok...maybe not the first bike experience...

The ZZR600 from Kawasaki sounds like it would fit the type of thing you're looking for...er...the 2004 or earlier ZZR600's as the 2005 is a reworked ZX-6 and twists your body a bit tighter. Sounds like the 650R mentioned above will take over the ZZR's previous slot. The Honda VFR800 is an excellent bike...very excellent, but it's probably best as a great 2nd bike instead of a 1st.
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:04:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2005 8:04:46 PM EDT by Hinckley]

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Kawasaki is going to release the new 650R Ninja next year.
650 V twin.




The very compact liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 649cc Parallel Twin...
Link Posted: 9/4/2005 8:15:55 PM EDT
Suzuki SV650 or the older tech Kawasaki EX500. Both are good first bikes and can be found cheap enough. Both are fairly comfortable unles your 6ft or over.

Get some training and the best gear you can afford.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 12:39:48 AM EDT
I'd recommend a USED SV650 The bikes are bought and ridden by Adults and a really nice, clean used SV650 will run ya about $3000.

Dave
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:13:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Corey:
I'm looking for a more upright riding position. I'd prefer something that's a little lighter. It needs to be quick but I don't need anything outrageous.

This would be a first motorcycle. I have extensive pedal cycling experience, so balance is probably not a major concern of mine (I've ridden a few motorcycles, but many years ago). I don't want a beginner bike, but something I can grow into.




First, your bicycle experiences are only vaguely related to motorcycle handling skills. About the only similarity is that they both have two wheels. Everything else, steering, braking, etc... is different.

TAKE A DOT APPROVED MOTORCYCLE CLASS!
www.dot.wisconsin.gov/safety/vehicle/motorcycle/index.htm#basic

You won't regret it if you take it, you might regret it if you don't.



Second, if your motorcycle is light enough for you to pick up easily you're not going to spend a lot of highway time on it. Light bikes are tossed around by air wash from trucks and cars pretty easily, and windy days simply suck. Also, light does not necessarily correlate with "quick" for a beginner. All motorcycles are going to seem quick to you until you get the hang of riding. If you want something that you can grow into, I recommend something in the 600 cc range. This is a good compromise between speed, weight, handling, and insurance premiums.





I also want a bike that has some personality. Are Buell bikes decent? $10K for a bike at this point isn't cost prohibitive for me (and this purchase might be a year+ out, I'm just starting to research it).



PLEASE GOD, DON'T LET COREY BUY A BUELL!



EDITED to add PS -- it's going to be used on a 15 mile commute. Probably 4 miles on 4 lane highway, 8 miles on 4 lane in town 35-45 mph zoned road, and another 3 miles in town.



Hehe, I didn't catch your edit until I started writing this.

Do not commute until you are comfortable on your bike. COMPLETELY comfortable. Then treat every commute as if you were riding through a war zone. The problems that riders have when they commute is that they get slack in their attention to traffic and get squashed by normal commuters. Ever had that experience where you drive all the way home from work and don't remember stopping at a stop light? This is the mental condition that will get you killed on a bike.

Highway riding... see my above comments about bike weight. For a highway bike, I recommend 1000 cc or larger.

You need to get a cheap bike NOW, then start riding it until you're familiar with riding in traffic before you buy a nice bike that you'll use for commuting in a year.

-Anthony
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:00:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 8:05:38 AM EDT by MadMaximillian]



EDITED to add PS -- it's going to be used on a 15 mile commute. Probably 4 miles on 4 lane highway, 8 miles on 4 lane in town 35-45 mph zoned road, and another 3 miles in town.



Hehe, I didn't catch your edit until I started writing this.

Do not commute until you are comfortable on your bike. COMPLETELY comfortable. Then treat every commute as if you were riding through a war zone. The problems that riders have when they commute is that they get slack in their attention to traffic and get squashed by normal commuters. Ever had that experience where you drive all the way home from work and don't remember stopping at a stop light? This is the mental condition that will get you killed on a bike.

Highway riding... see my above comments about bike weight. For a highway bike, I recommend 1000 cc or larger.

You need to get a cheap bike NOW, then start riding it until you're familiar with riding in traffic before you buy a nice bike that you'll use for commuting in a year.

-Anthony

Yeah, what he said.

Corey: you don't really "grow into the bike". You get a bike and learn a whole new skill set. I heard somewhere that motorcycle riding is second only to piloting aircraft in the demands of hand/eye coordination and what not. Each hand, and each foot has a separate task, and they all need to work together. Add to this there are lots of cars out there with drivers programmed to look for other cars, NOT motorcycles. A dandy addition is our roads are generally designed for 40 years ago with 1-2 cars per family and now lots of high schoolers get a car before they even graduate, hence th 3+ car families and strain on road systems. We're only talking about your life here.

Like Anthony said, ride like you're in a war zone, because it IS a war zone. Having an SUV moving into your lane without looking was a real "oh $h!t" moment the first time it happened. Mother driving was probably blabbing on a cell phone while screaming at her kids. (nowadays I expect stupid drivers so much I sorta anticipate things like this with a 6th sense and it doesn't really surprise me or get my blood going anymore)

Okay having said all this, a less powerful and lighter bike is much more forgiving on the learning curve. Generally riders who started smaller/lighter/less horsepower get much better at riding.
I suggest message boards like www.beginnerandbeyond.com, www.beginnerbikers.org, or go to most any motorcycle board and you'll usually find a beginner page where most of the old hands say the same thing about starting smaller. For more acrimonious debate over what size to start on, look at the beginner pages on pages like gixxer.com, sportbikes.net, cycleforums.com, sport-touring.net, and a bunch of others.

Final advice: Take a motorcycle safety class like an MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) BRC (Beginner Riding Class). Most states have them through DOT, but with MSF instructors (motorcycle enthusiasts, NOT DMV people!), successful completion is usually accepted by the state as your driving test for a full M class license (check with your state though), and you get to learn on THEIR bikes used specifically for the class, so if this isn't for you then you aren't stuck with a bought bike already. When I took MSF BRC I loved it even though I was struggling. 9 out of 11 people in our class changed their minds on their first bike to something smaller by the end of the weekend. The 2 other guys already had riding time and one was staying with a mid-sized bike while the other already had his bike and rode it in class.

Hope that helps.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:06:09 AM EDT
I reccomend a SV650 or a Honda VFR800.

The Honda you can do 600 miles a day and not feel it.

BEWARE of used SV650's. They are a popular race bike at the club level, and once the orriginal plastics are put back on, it is hard to decipher whether it's beat.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:18:25 AM EDT
If you want a more upright position then you dont want a sport bike. You want a sport-touring bike. The handlebars are a little higher and the position is less radical. Something like a 600r, or a suzuki 650, or along that line.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:42:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 8:46:12 AM EDT by Irish317]
Great place for gear....

newenough

Sean
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 8:45:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 5:38:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Gravity_Tester:

....

Don't be tempted to go the Racer Replica route. Pure sport bikes are fun, but too much time ass up and head down makes your hands hurt. Besides, who wants to have their ass higher than their head?

....

GT



I'm not. I specified a more upright riding position. I'm looking to have fun on this, not race it. I'm realistic in my expectations and want to be comfortable.


Originally Posted By Gravity_Tester:

Buell is of questionable quality. Associated with Hardley Ableson Chrome Tractor Co.
....



Please expand on this anti-Buell info I've been getting.


Originally Posted By Muad_Dib:

....

Do not commute until you are comfortable on your bike. COMPLETELY comfortable. Then treat every commute as if you were riding through a war zone. The problems that riders have when they commute is that they get slack in their attention to traffic and get squashed by normal commuters. Ever had that experience where you drive all the way home from work and don't remember stopping at a stop light? This is the mental condition that will get you killed on a bike.

Highway riding... see my above comments about bike weight. For a highway bike, I recommend 1000 cc or larger.

You need to get a cheap bike NOW, then start riding it until you're familiar with riding in traffic before you buy a nice bike that you'll use for commuting in a year.

-Anthony



Thanks for the concern everyone. I pretty much know what to expect out there and would ride pro-actively.

My highway miles are really going to be limited. Shit, I hate driving the beltline during rush hour when I'm in a car. I doubt I would do it on a bike.

And I'd love a cheap bike now. But as you know I'm in the middle of another "small" project. Once that is done I'll start to think about the bike.


Originally Posted By MadMaximillian:

....

Corey: you don't really "grow into the bike". You get a bike and learn a whole new skill set. I heard somewhere that motorcycle riding is second only to piloting aircraft in the demands of hand/eye coordination and what not. Each hand, and each foot has a separate task, and they all need to work together.

....

Okay having said all this, a less powerful and lighter bike is much more forgiving on the learning curve. Generally riders who started smaller/lighter/less horsepower get much better at riding.



I'm a pretty athletic guy and have very good balance and limb independence. I've ridden before but a loooong time ago. And it was one of these small kids MX bikes. I didn't have any problem hopping on and riding it. I definitely plan on spending the first couple of hundred miles out in the country practicing starting, stopping, etc. I want operation of the controls to be second nature before I hit rush hour traffic.

And that was what I was thinking about a less powerful, lighter bike. I want it for fun, not racing.


Originally Posted By Stormtrooper:
If you want a more upright position then you dont want a sport bike. You want a sport-touring bike. The handlebars are a little higher and the position is less radical. Something like a 600r, or a suzuki 650, or along that line.



Exactly.

So how much are those 650R's going for? I think I need one.

Corey
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:05:44 PM EDT
Corey:

I think the 650Rs are so new that none have arrived in dealers yet.

A good starting point for your search and investigation: Check out www.cycletrader.com
Click on "search"
Then scroll down and click on "advanced search"
Limit the search to say year 2000 up to 2005, then pick a comfy price range, say $2500 to $6000, and limit it again to your zip code and going out 100 miles in all directions

Also specify "motorcycle" and do different searches on "dual sport", "standard", "touring", and "sport bike"

You should get all sorts of interesting hits, not just new dealer stuff but private sellers, dealers marking down models from a year ago, etc. Watch it for a while and realize there are MANY bikes out there maybe a few years old that are garage queens, or ones bought new and ridden only a few hundred miles.

As one example when I used "EX" as the keyword search:

DESCRIPTION
2004 KAWASAKI Ninja EX 250 Excellent condition, barely used, only 130 miles. Perfect starter/commuter bike. $2500.00. Landing, NJ. 973-601-9159

As to be expected, beware of swindlers. Read some motorcycle message boards and you can see several posts on "this is what this guy tried to pull on me"

Having said all this, don't get trapped into thinking "I'll never find a deal this good again" when you see some of the ads. If you read it long enough you'll see lots of jaw-dropping for sale ads. When you're ready to buy one be advised that the really good deals may vanish within days (hours?) of the ad appearing so don't dawdle too long after you've made up your mind.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:26:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MadMaximillian:
Corey:

I think the 650Rs are so new that none have arrived in dealers yet.

A good starting point for your search and investigation: Check out www.cycletrader.com
Click on "search"
Then scroll down and click on "advanced search"
Limit the search to say year 2000 up to 2005, then pick a comfy price range, say $2500 to $6000, and limit it again to your zip code and going out 100 miles in all directions

Also specify "motorcycle" and do different searches on "dual sport", "standard", "touring", and "sport bike"

You should get all sorts of interesting hits, not just new dealer stuff but private sellers, dealers marking down models from a year ago, etc. Watch it for a while and realize there are MANY bikes out there maybe a few years old that are garage queens, or ones bought new and ridden only a few hundred miles.

As one example when I used "EX" as the keyword search:

DESCRIPTION
2004 KAWASAKI Ninja EX 250 Excellent condition, barely used, only 130 miles. Perfect starter/commuter bike. $2500.00. Landing, NJ. 973-601-9159

As to be expected, beware of swindlers. Read some motorcycle message boards and you can see several posts on "this is what this guy tried to pull on me"

Having said all this, don't get trapped into thinking "I'll never find a deal this good again" when you see some of the ads. If you read it long enough you'll see lots of jaw-dropping for sale ads. When you're ready to buy one be advised that the really good deals may vanish within days (hours?) of the ad appearing so don't dawdle too long after you've made up your mind.



Thanks. I'm going to go check the site out. I'm not ready to buy, but if I screw around on this site for 9 months I'll be in a better position when it does come time to pull the trigger.

Corey
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 10:26:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/5/2005 10:27:31 PM EDT by tugboat]

Originally Posted By Corey:
I'm looking for a more upright riding position. I'd prefer something that's a little lighter. It needs to be quick but I don't need anything outrageous.

This would be a first motorcycle. I have extensive pedal cycling experience, so balance is probably not a major concern of mine (I've ridden a few motorcycles, but many years ago). I don't want a beginner bike, but something I can grow into.

I also want a bike that has some personality. Are Buell bikes decent? $10K for a bike at this point isn't cost prohibitive for me (and this purchase might be a year+ out, I'm just starting to research it).

Thanks for your suggestions.

Corey

EDITED to add PS -- it's going to be used on a 15 mile commute. Probably 4 miles on 4 lane highway, 8 miles on 4 lane in town 35-45 mph zoned road, and another 3 miles in town.




2006 HD Bobber is something like $13K
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 12:23:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Wingman26:
If you want to ride, you really don't want a Buell, or anything with a Harley engine in it.




Could you elaborate on some of the trouble you had with yours?
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:48:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 6:49:46 AM EDT by chevypower]
One of these is what you need........
A 2005 Ducati Monster S2R Dark... retail is $7,995

or for a little more fun but a little pricier.......

2005 Ducati Monster Sr4.... retail is $13,495

Check them out!!

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:55:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By chevypower:
One of these is what you need........
A 2005 Ducati Monster S2R Dark... retail is $7,995

or for a little more fun but a little pricier.......

2005 Ducati Monster Sr4.... retail is $13,495

Check them out!!




My wife and I have a Ducati Monster 750 that's alot of fun. It's sporty and has the nice v-twin sound to it.

Plus when people ask if you have a Harley or something Japanese you can just answer "Italian, baby."
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:17:56 AM EDT
Buy something cheap for your first bike. Ninja 250 or 500, Suzuki GS500 (whatever the damn letters are) or something else small and cheap.

x2 on taking the MSF course

Buy the best gear you can afford and wear it!
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:56:31 AM EDT
I took the MSF course, and drove from KC to DesMoines the next night to buy a 92 ex500 (ninja) to learn on. After about 10K miles I picked up this, an 02 SV650S. Fast, light, handles amazing.
I put heavier oil/springs in the forks, ss brake lines and a rear shock from a gsxr750. It will keep up with any modern sportbike in the twisties and will keep up with the 600's up to 100. Plenty of low end grunt for the city and you don't need to drop it down a gear or two for highway passing, just roll on the throttle.

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 8:12:44 AM EDT
tag.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 8:17:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gravity_Tester:
SV650. Don't get the S. Screw all that plastic stuff.



+1 Excellent suggestion.

G
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 9:12:11 AM EDT
Here is some information I found on the Kawasaki 650R.

motorcycledaily.com/31august05_2006kawasaki_ninja650r.htm

www.motorcycledaily.com/15july05_2006kawasaki_er6n.htm

Basically it's the new ER6n from Europe that has was just released a few months ago. Kawasaki is giving it a bigger front fascia (moving away from what is apparently referred to as the "naked" look) and bringing it to the US as the 650R. Speculation is that it should run about $6,500 to compete against the Suzuki SV650.

Corey (who is really liking what I'm learning about this bike)
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 10:13:48 AM EDT
BTW, I have to ask.

What is a parallel twin engine?

And do I have to worry about the aluminum unlined but plated cylinders?

Thanks,

Corey
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:33:43 AM EDT

Please, for everybody's sake, take an MSF class!
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 11:57:18 AM EDT
Ditto on Jon3 above - the MSF class is most excellent. Make sure you learn it RIGHT the first time.

As far as your choice in bikes is concerned - it *is* possible to hop on a sportbike for your first bike IF (and that's the big question) you have the maturity to respect the power these bikes offer. I went from a Honda Nighthawk 750 (my first bike) to a Kawasaki ZX-9R within one year. I was right about 30 years old at that time. I did manage to low-side my second ZX-9R about 3 years ago, but that's a different story.

I was just in a dealership this weekend looking for a new jacket, and hopped on a ZX-10R. I was surprised how upright the seating position is on that bike. I'm not advocating that you buy one of those, but I guess they've managed to make good handling bikes without punishing yo physically. I'm 6'2" FWIW.

Your best bet may be to look for a low-mileage used bike; you'dbe amazed how many people buy one, ride it for a few weeks, and then gind they don't like it, or can't handle and/or pay for their new toy. You can get some incredible deals.

As far as what kind of bike to get - go with your initial instincts. Buying a motorcycle is a very emotional decision - you can try to talk yourself into something "sensible", but if you had a certain kind of bike in mind in the first place, then go with that or you'll always be wishing for it.

So the question is, what do you want exactly? Sportbike? 600 or liter class? Sport Tourer? Naked bike?

You gotta narrow it down before you can really figure that part out. From the sounds of it, a sport-touring bike is what you want (again - don't *settle* for that if you had a race replica in mind originally. You'll just waste money buying the sport tourer first).

Go to www.motorcycle.com and get a subscription with which you can do some research. I really like their reviews...
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 12:50:34 PM EDT
Guess I should read the article next time....


Originally Posted By Hinckley:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Kawasaki is going to release the new 650R Ninja next year.
650 V twin.




The very compact liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 649cc Parallel Twin...

Link Posted: 9/6/2005 1:10:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 1:11:28 PM EDT by Corey]

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Guess I should read the article next time....


Originally Posted By Hinckley:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Kawasaki is going to release the new 650R Ninja next year.
650 V twin.




The very compact liquid-cooled, DOHC, 8-valve 649cc Parallel Twin...




Okay, now I think I get it. The two cylinders are inline (parallel) to each other.

Corey

EDITED to say thanks to KA3B for mentioning this not yet released yet bike.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 10:32:42 AM EDT
I rode sportbikes and cruisers back and forth to work for years and learned a few things. First of all no mattter how "fun" they are to ride you absolutely cannot relax on them. People will not see you(left hand turning vehicles and vehicles entering from semi blind intersections). You have to adhere to a lot more precautions because of the fact that a driver can look right at you and never see you (I know this from experience fom both side of the saddle). (I know most if not all of this pertains to driving automobiles as well) When you wake up in the morning and go to work if you are not wide awake you will probably choose to drive your car. If you wake up and its raining you will probably drive instead. If you wake up and hear the forecast is for rain you will prolly drive again. How many months in your area are you not really able to ride a MC? When you get off work sometimes you just do not feel like dealing with a bike you just want to sit back and enjoy your drive home in the comfort of your automobile. As you can see the bike will most likely spend a lot of time sitting in the garage. I love riding and would ride in the cold and rain but my bikes ended up sitting far more often then being ridden. Now I look at bikes strictly as recreation and if I happen to want to ride it to work then fine but I know that the bike is gonna just sit there 90% of the time.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 10:58:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2005 10:59:43 AM EDT by Fast_Jimmy]

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I reccomend a SV650 or a Honda VFR800.

The Honda you can do 600 miles a day and not feel it.

BEWARE of used SV650's. They are a popular race bike at the club level, and once the orriginal plastics are put back on, it is hard to decipher whether it's beat.



I don't know about the new VFR800. I owned a 98 edition until it was stolen and THAT was a great bike.

The new ones have an absolutely idiotic VTEC system that takes the seamlessness out of the power delivery and MASSIVELY complicates things. Tech for Tech's sake isn't really innovation, and I think the simpler fuel injection systems from honda's other bikes, and the rest of the cycling world, are just fine.

The other thing that this hopelessly complicated drive train has delivered to the VFR800 is incredibly expensive, time consuming valve adjustment intervals. Just imagine a nice 500 dollar expense from out of nowhere every 16,000 miles.

Seriously, I simply would say no to bikes for commuting. It's messy, dangerous, more expensive than a cheap car, and forces something inherently fun into a utilitarian role.

PS. The extensive re-engineering of the VFR800 powertrain resulted in little or no power gains. If that's not a waste of time, I don't know what is.
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