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Posted: 11/3/2009 3:10:39 PM EST
1975 Ford 302, Edelbrock 1406 on a Weiand Stealth, GM/HEI electronic ignition, 18mm plugs gapped @ .035, "RV" cam, stock piston. Vacuum diaphragm is ported to the constant side of the carb, not the "timed" port.
It's set at 20 degrees BTDC (vacuum disconnected) "pings" a little under hard acceleration and 89 Oct. fuel
Idles and runs pretty well, but it never hurts to get another opinion.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 4:02:25 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 4:10:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/4/2009 6:03:04 PM EST by wildearp]
Try less: 8 to 12 initial. Get an adjustable timing light so you can find out what your total time is.

There is lots of controversy about the vacuum advance, sorta like 9mm vs .45, however, I have the best results with the timed port.


The 1406 is known to be very lean. I just dialed one in. You need to down load or read the owners manual for the carb. The spring you chose on the primary needles (spring kit) is determined by your idle vacuum. I called Edelbrock and described my engine and camshaft and they told me to use the 1458 needle and pink spring. This is the first Edelbrock I have owned that did not run correctly right out of the box. Of course, your initial timing will play a big part in all of this. There are too many variables that come into play, such as whether you are running a pcv, or your intake runners, cam, exhaust, etc. so there is very little likelihood that your carb is set up correctly for your motor.

My app is a 290hp 350 chevy with a bit of cam and 21 inches of vacuum at idle.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 4:41:21 PM EST
The carb was brand new and came with the manuals.
tonight is the first it's run more than a minute or so. (was waiting on radiator hoses) took it out for gas and a six mile run.
this is the first carb that I've ever run right out of the box that ran as well as this one.
I haven't "tuned" it yet, or checked the vacuum level, but it runs STRONG....exhaust smells a little rich, but not too bad.
Tomorrow I'll retard the timing to 15 degrees, hook a tach/dwell up, and plug in a vacuum gauge to the manifold to start ironing things out. Maybe run a compression test to get a better idea what kind of pressure is in there.
This was a used engine: the previous owner spent a LOT of money on machine work and high quality parts, problem is the old guy couldn't fine the receipts detailing all the work done and parts installed. The engine came out after ~3K because the frame cracked and the body was rusted. (they use rock salt on the roads all winter up here )

I have an adjustable timing light. Seems like it was at zero when I started checking the timing...I dialed it around until the strobe flashed at zero on the balancer, then looked at the dial: it was right at 10.

Years ago I used to get the engine good & warmed up, set it, run it, if it pinged, retard it a little at a time until it stopped. Back them I did everything be ear, trial & error....now days I prefer to do things by the book. [://
At least these old dinosaurs are very forgiving.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 4:48:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 4:31:29 AM EST
I'm trying to figure out how you got that GM distributor to fit in a small block ford! Really, what kind of set up is that? Compression? Stock heads or aluminum?
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 4:51:53 AM EST
Any idea what you are running total for timing?
Is the mechanical advance adjustable in that distributor?
I am a big fan of setting total so you don't ping and then
work the curve backwards...

If you don't need every last MPG you could dump the vacuum advance
and do all mechanical. The last few hot rods I built I have gotten completely
away from vacuum advance and pcv. Fuel today is shitty enough without
sucking oil into the intake.

Chris
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 8:07:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By ScottsGT:
I'm trying to figure out how you got that GM distributor to fit in a small block ford! Really, what kind of set up is that? Compression? Stock heads or aluminum?


Here's the distributor

Iron heads, pre 1974 because they use 18mm spark plugs.
Double coil springs (I pulled one rocker cover off to look inside; spotless)
I'm going to say everything is or is close to "stock"
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 8:13:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By Cobradriver:
Any idea what you are running total for timing?
Is the mechanical advance adjustable in that distributor?
I am a big fan of setting total so you don't ping and then
work the curve backwards...

If you don't need every last MPG you could dump the vacuum advance
and do all mechanical. The last few hot rods I built I have gotten completely
away from vacuum advance and pcv. Fuel today is shitty enough without
sucking oil into the intake.

Chris


Setting it ahead and working back is what I've always done in the past.
I don't know if the mechanical advance is adjustable, proabably not.
Daily driver for a 16 y/o so alll the MPG he can get is necessary.
Gasoline up here sux! ~10% or less ETOH, $2.85 9/10th for 87 octane.
I do buy 100LL Avaition gasoline for my old BMW motorcycle, and the Airboat, so I'll dump a gallon or two into the truck to help keep the valves lubricated.
Never really thought about blocking the PCV off....Vehicles before ~1963 just had vent tubes: kinda messy, but effective.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 6:11:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Originally Posted By ScottsGT:
I'm trying to figure out how you got that GM distributor to fit in a small block ford! Really, what kind of set up is that? Compression? Stock heads or aluminum?


Here's the distributor

Iron heads, pre 1974 because they use 18mm spark plugs.
Double coil springs (I pulled one rocker cover off to look inside; spotless)
I'm going to say everything is or is close to "stock"


Sweet distributor. I see lots of engines, but I haven't seen one of those, yet.
Link Posted: 11/5/2009 1:54:22 AM EST
Originally Posted By wildearp:
Originally Posted By fp1201:
Originally Posted By ScottsGT:
I'm trying to figure out how you got that GM distributor to fit in a small block ford! Really, what kind of set up is that? Compression? Stock heads or aluminum?


Here's the distributor

Iron heads, pre 1974 because they use 18mm spark plugs.
Double coil springs (I pulled one rocker cover off to look inside; spotless)
I'm going to say everything is or is close to "stock"


Sweet distributor. I see lots of engines, but I haven't seen one of those, yet.


It was a first for me as well.
I proabably wouldn't have gone out and bought one, but since it came with the engine I went ahead and used it. One 12V was all it took to make it work, and has a spade terminal for the tachometer right beside it....Nice thing is you can get HEI ignition components damn near anywhere and they're cheap!

We've a friend who is licensed (BATFE) to produce alcohol for fuel and the Edelbrock is easily changed, so we're considering a second tank & fuel lines to try ETOH. The only cavet is Edelbrock says in the literature that accompanied the carb to NOT use alcohol, but their web sites says their carb is compatable. This carb was brand new in the box, but I'm still not sure which way to go.
Link Posted: 11/5/2009 5:56:43 AM EST
Cool distributor. I'll have to put one in my Mustang when I get it running and tell all the chevy guys my motor is a small block chevy installed backwards Off the shelf reliable electronic ignition for the small block ford. Neat.
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