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4/1/2020 4:14:10 PM
4/1/2020 6:58:51 AM
Posted: 12/23/2004 1:19:06 PM EDT
Just got an assignment for Police Magazine on bicycles for patrol officers. Looking to find out what's available in the way of different models. Since I'm not a bike guy, I don't really know all the manufacturers who offer bikes marketed specifically for or adaptable to patrol use.

So, can you clue me in on what bikes are used in your department?

Also, as a bike patrol officer, what features do you look for in a bike? TIA, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
Link Posted: 12/23/2004 1:29:40 PM EDT
Smith & Wesson was making a model or two several years ago, at the peak of the Bike Patrol "craze".

Our agency didn't have them.  We opted for waverunner's instead.  
Link Posted: 12/23/2004 1:33:35 PM EDT
I think the Seattle bike cops use to ride Raleigh Techniums. The latest thing are battery powered bikes
Link Posted: 12/23/2004 2:52:53 PM EDT
Fuji, Smith & Wesson, Trek, and Cannondale all make police packages that I know of.   We purchase Treks, mainly because they are lightweight, use durable parts in their construction, and are priced fairly cheap when compared to the civilian version.  I don't know about the other manufacturers, but every time we crack a Trek frame, they send us a new one without any trouble.  It sounds bad to crack a frame, but when you put 5 or 6 thousand miles a year on a bicycle, and throw in curbs, stairs, cobblestone streets, and bike throw downs, I am not at all bothered by a little breakage.  Check out www.IPMBA.org for more info.

BuellRider  (Self propelled police officer)
Link Posted: 12/27/2004 12:39:46 PM EDT
We buy our own bikes.

I ride a Specialized Enduro Expert (full sus.)

I put a cat's eye on the front, a bell and a post mounted rack on the back.  That's about it.  Some guys dig all the fancy little sirens and flashing lights but I do fine with what I have.

As for bikes marketed as "police bikes," AFAIK with most the only difference is "police" painted on the frame of their production bike (Trek)

NorCal  

Link Posted: 12/27/2004 8:27:01 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2004 8:27:13 PM EDT by LPDtactical]
Well Bike patrol is my gig during the warmer months.  I am not hardcore enough to ride through Ohio winters.  
I also am a certified IPMBA instructor (International Police Mountain Bike Association).  Our department uses mainly Treks although we have 1 smith and wesson.  I have been riding the same Trek for the past 2 years and love it.  Its the 2003 Police model.  Trek makes a quality bike, but they are not the only ones out there.  Most of the major manufacturers have a police model.  The main thing is, don't go out to wally world and buy a bike thinking it will hold up to the rigors of police duty.  I taught a class 2 years ago and a department sent some officers with Huffy bicycles.  I could not believe it.  The officers were embarresed but didn't have a choice.  I did an inspection on the bikes and DQ'ed them pretty damn quick.  They ended up taking the course using a few bikes out of our inventory.  

The equipment is important, but the training is by far the most important part of police cycling.  Making sure the officers attend a formal bike school put on by a reputable orginization is a must.  Check out IPMBA.  You can go to the instructor search and find one in your area.  You will find me in Ohio.  I'd be happy to answer ANY questions you have on bike patrol.
Link Posted: 12/27/2004 8:30:33 PM EDT
so what's it like to do a PIT maneuver on a bike?
<­BR>

J/K
Link Posted: 12/27/2004 9:41:56 PM EDT
The department I worked at over the summer used piece of shit Treks, they did not hold up well at all.  But our first aid squad authorized us to buy bikes last year to use for special events so we bought Gary Fisher Police package bikes complete with flashing red lights and equipment bags in the rear. In my opinion these bikes are well worth the money, they are awesome quality and lightweight as well.
Link Posted: 12/28/2004 7:59:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LPDtactical:
I taught a class 2 years ago and a department sent some officers with Huffy bicycles.  I could not believe it.  The officers were embarresed but didn't have a choice.  I did an inspection on the bikes and DQ'ed them pretty damn quick.  They ended up taking the course using a few bikes out of our inventory.  



 That would be pretty embarassing.  Aren't those things still steel?

LPD- good site.  How does IPMBA training compare with the CA POST bike requirements?  I browsed the Training section and the course requirements seem about the same with the exception of the addition of simunitions and the Rapid response Team training as a separate block.

Bike training (basic, int and adv) is some of the toughest skills and physical training I have been through.

NorCal
Link Posted: 12/28/2004 12:06:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NorCal_LEO:

Originally Posted By LPDtactical:
I taught a class 2 years ago and a department sent some officers with Huffy bicycles.  I could not believe it.  The officers were embarresed but didn't have a choice.  I did an inspection on the bikes and DQ'ed them pretty damn quick.  They ended up taking the course using a few bikes out of our inventory.  



 That would be pretty embarassing.  Aren't those things still steel?

LPD- good site.  How does IPMBA training compare with the CA POST bike requirements?  I browsed the Training section and the course requirements seem about the same with the exception of the addition of simunitions and the Rapid response Team training as a separate block.

Bike training (basic, int and adv) is some of the toughest skills and physical training I have been through.

NorCal



Yep, those huffys are still steel!!

I am not sure what the CA POST bike requirements are, but I am positive IPMBA's police cyclist course fufills them.  Its a great course and lots of fun.  definately not a gimmie though, I usually lose 1 - 2 students per course to injuries or not being able to complete due to physical ability..
Link Posted: 12/28/2004 1:29:57 PM EDT
One of me EMS companies uses bikes at events

Frameset:
FRAME: Alpha SLR Aluminum. Double butted, seamless drawn round tubing. Custom butted 1-1/8" head tube. Stiff, powerful elliptical chainstays. Cold forged replaceable derailleur hanger. Trek Pro Race geometry. Handmade in the USA.
FORK: RockShox Judy TT, dual stage coil/elastomer, adjustable preload, 80mm travel

Wheels:
Bontrager Triple Wall Clyde rims; Shimano Nexave with Silent Clutch rear hubs; 14G stainless spokes
TIRES: Bontrager Invert w/Schraeder valve, 26x2.0"

Components:
SADDLE: Trek ATB
SEATPOST: Bontrager Sport
HANDLEBARS: Bontrager Select
STEM: Alloy ATB AHS, 25°
HEADSET: AHS 1-1/8" semi cartridge, sealed

Don't ask me what half of it means, it's just the information posted on our websight.
Link Posted: 12/29/2004 10:40:52 AM EDT
Mercedes Benz makes a mountain bike that they have been donating to various departments over the last couple years. Article says they've given away 1000 bikes across the country.

popularmechanics.com/outdoors/bicycles/2001/1/nypd_mountain_bikes/
Link Posted: 1/4/2005 10:57:59 AM EDT
BTT. (Still looking for more input on what features bike patrol officers want in their bicycles. Thanks!)
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:24:07 PM EDT
I want a front suspension, comfortable seat ( I like the Serfas one with the hole in it), puncture resistant tires, and a long lasting bag on  the back.  Most bags have foam inside them, and after a time, the foam breaks down and the bag has no more shape to it.  They hang lopsided.  I want tough zippers on it, too.

I also want a really good maintenance class so I can fix more stuff myself.  It's tougher to true a wheel then you think it is.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 8:56:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 8:56:36 PM EDT by Bonk2029]

Originally Posted By Mark_J:
I want a front suspension, comfortable seat ( I like the Serfas one with the hole in it), puncture resistant tires, and a long lasting bag on  the back.  Most bags have foam inside them, and after a time, the foam breaks down and the bag has no more shape to it.  They hang lopsided.  I want tough zippers on it, too.

I also want a really good maintenance class so I can fix more stuff myself.  It's tougher to true a wheel then you think it is.



Exactly, plus one of those suspension-seat-posts.  I ride a Raleigh 80, FWIW.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:46:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2005 8:47:59 AM EDT by Mountaincop]
Norcal,

The CA POST course IS the IPMBA course.  It was just photocopied and submitted with a safety plan, I think.  I went through both, and they were identical.  You're right....I got my workout in the basic courses.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 2:20:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Mountaincop:
Norcal,

The CA POST course IS the IPMBA course.  It was just photocopied and submitted with a safety plan, I think.  I went through both, and they were identical.  You're right....I got my workout in the basic courses.



Ya, I thought they were pretty identical.  Thanks for the info bro.

NorCal
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