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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/27/2004 6:33:20 AM EST
Guys, the old boat is now sold, and I'm shopping for a new one. Of course, following the rule of boat ownership, It HAS to be bigger than the last one.

This has created a problem. I've chosen the class of boat, but I still own a 1/2 ton truck. (F150) New trailer weight is going to be right below the max tow rating on the Ford. In fact, if I fill the gas tank on the boat it goes over by about 100 lbs. Tongue weight is within spec, and I have a receiver hitch. Boat and trailer together are 28 ft long and the trailer has brakes and tandem axles.

What do you think of this situation? Most of my tows are short range, 20 miles or so, though some of the areas can be hilly. Maybe five or six 800 mile trips a year. I'm also worried about the ability of getting the rig up the boat ramp. Some of them in this area are quite steep and long.

I've always preferred to stay at about 60/70% of the posted max tow rating, but buying a new truck AND a new boat really isn't possible. Think I can do this without making a grenade out of the transmission?

Link Posted: 10/27/2004 6:36:41 AM EST
hmm, tranny cooler, supercharger, upgrade the brakes, upgrade the rear springs, yep that should about do it
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 6:37:29 AM EST
Sounds like someone needs to buy a cabin on the lake, complete w/ boat slip.......

In all seriousness, if you like your transmission, don't do the 800-mile trips.

And steep and/or wet boat ramps will be fun.


There's nothing funnier than driving to the public ramps during the summer as the first rain in a month or so hits the lake. All those folks trying to get off the lake, and the first folks on the slick, steep ramp are pulling 24-foot ski boats with half-ton 2wd trucks........
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 6:43:35 AM EST
What is the limiting factor on your truck's tow rating?

I have a small (16') Glastron with a 140 Mercruiser. The boat + trailer weigh around 1600 lbs or so. My Ford Probe is only listed at pulling 1000 lbs max, but I've been pulling my boat with it for six years without any problems, because the limitation is engine cooling comes from a limited ability to cool the engine at higher altitudes in hot weather. Not a problem for me.

And I haven't gotten stuck at a boat ramp yet, either. I did once with an even smaller vehicle pulling the boat once, but we got out easily enough with a little "push" from the boat as the car started up the ramp.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 6:53:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:
What is the limiting factor on your truck's tow rating?

I have a small (16') Glastron with a 140 Mercruiser. The boat + trailer weigh around 1600 lbs or so. My Ford Probe is only listed at pulling 1000 lbs max, but I've been pulling my boat with it for six years without any problems, because the limitation is engine cooling comes from a limited ability to cool the engine at higher altitudes in hot weather. Not a problem for me.

And I haven't gotten stuck at a boat ramp yet, either. I did once with an even smaller vehicle pulling the boat once, but we got out easily enough with a little "push" from the boat as the car started up the ramp.



Max on the truck according to the manual is 7K lbs. The new boat and trailer weighs in at 6500 lbs. (Twin 250 Yamahas) figure batteries, (3) 110 gallons gas, 2 spare tires on the trailer, coolers, etc. and we go over. The old boat weighed 4600, but towing it was not a problem. I don't think cooling is a limiting factor in my case. (Maybe in the tranny, but I have a cooler already)
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 6:54:59 AM EST
Borrow my wife. That pig can pull a big load.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 7:05:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By Johninaustin:

Originally Posted By ChiefPilot:
What is the limiting factor on your truck's tow rating?

I have a small (16') Glastron with a 140 Mercruiser. The boat + trailer weigh around 1600 lbs or so. My Ford Probe is only listed at pulling 1000 lbs max, but I've been pulling my boat with it for six years without any problems, because the limitation is engine cooling comes from a limited ability to cool the engine at higher altitudes in hot weather. Not a problem for me.

And I haven't gotten stuck at a boat ramp yet, either. I did once with an even smaller vehicle pulling the boat once, but we got out easily enough with a little "push" from the boat as the car started up the ramp.



Max on the truck according to the manual is 7K lbs. The new boat and trailer weighs in at 6500 lbs. (Twin 250 Yamahas) figure batteries, (3) 110 gallons gas, 2 spare tires on the trailer, coolers, etc. and we go over. The old boat weighed 4600, but towing it was not a problem. I don't think cooling is a limiting factor in my case. (Maybe in the tranny, but I have a cooler already)




If you are only towing about 7500-8000lbs and only for 20 miles, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Check your tranny fluid often (auto, right?), if it starts to smell bad, it is getting burned. I would NOT try to tow that much weight for 800 miles, though.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 7:10:51 AM EST
The rating is for braking and rear axle load. If you are worried about the tranny slow down on hill climbs and use a lower gear (yes, you can down shift an automatic that is what the selector is for). Slow down, you will have no problems. Planerench out.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 7:14:26 AM EST
Just put the thing in low range (assume it's 4x4) for the ramp. On the road 7k# is no problem for you.
Link Posted: 10/27/2004 7:34:27 AM EST


John,
Your main concern should be the transmission. There is a certain amount of slippage between the clutches all of the time, this increases exponentially as the load increases such as towing, slippage/friction/heat. A transmission cooler is a good countermeasure but no guarantee that your transmission won't bite the dust due to excessive wear. The only advise I could give you is to go easy on the throttle during takeoff and avoid steep hills, baby the throttle.


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