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Posted: 11/26/2003 7:38:39 AM EDT
I've recently picked up Judo as a hobby. I find it suits my the best for what I'm looking for in a martial art. That being a physical and mental discipline in a fitness regimine.

But......Where I train is looking like they won't last much longer and will be closing thier doors soon. So I would like to find another dojo but Judo is pretty rare in my area. No judo clubs close enough to me to be pratical.

My question is what other arts are throwing and grappling oriented? I'm pretty uneducated as to the different arts and styles. I know of course Ju Jitsu is a grappling art and that's about it.

I'm looking for the physical and mental discipline primarily. Not looking to "kick ass".

Help me out here guys.
Link Posted: 12/7/2003 4:41:49 PM EDT
You might look into Sambo. Its very similar to Judo. More or less the Russian military version of it. More into leg locks and less into chokes otherwise pretty similar from what I understand. I have very limited exposure to both. You might check out the self defense forum. [url]www.selfdefenseforums.com[/url] You'll be able to find out a lot more information there and possibly some local places to train.
Link Posted: 12/8/2003 7:16:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/8/2003 7:19:36 AM EDT by cookie]
Find a boxing gym. Disclaimer: I'm not a "master". I hope that wasn't really a prerequisite for throwing in my two cents. [:)]
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 9:08:26 PM EDT
try an internal style of kung fu... tai chi, hsing yi, or pau kua...
Link Posted: 12/21/2003 9:49:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By manghu67: try an internal style of kung fu... tai chi, hsing yi, or pau kua...
View Quote
seconding that, but with a qualifier. Nearly ALL styles contain grappling techniques - some just emphasize it more than others. At high levels, even tae kwon do (if not totally sportified) practitioners study throws and holds. Let me stress, befoe I go on: don't be focused completely on the "name" on the sign. The instructor and the training environment is everything. Ask to watch a class or a few and see if that is what you want. Watch the more experienced guys and see if that is how you want to be. I quoted and agreed with mangu67 becasue the odds are that a Chinese style - even the "external" styles, will offer you plenty of what you are looking for. Of course, the "internal" styles will emphasize it a lot more. This kind if thing really defies categorization, so again - visit the school. As for non-Chinese arts that focus more on grappling and "internal" techniques, you may want to also look at the Japanese art of "Aikido" or its Korean equivalent "Hapkido." As for Judo, be aware that that is a sport, not really a martial art. Ju Jitsi is essentially the practical side of Judo (I beleive Judo the sport derived from Ju Jitsu). Still, the falls and SOME of the throws you have learned apply universally - but you MAY have picked up some bad habits. There is also the immensely popular Brazilian Ju Jitsu - but, as with anything "popular" there are more BS schools springing up than good ones. Good luck. Just remember, there is no policing agency that can stop any schmo from declaring his own style or variant and opening up a martial arts studio.
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 4:19:51 AM EDT
Have studied various martial arts and just began studying Aikido. Love it. Found this school and instructor by searching the web. There are a lot of internet resources for the martial artist. Use them to find schools and then as someone already said go WATCH!!!
Link Posted: 12/22/2003 7:34:08 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Adam_White:
Originally Posted By manghu67: try an internal style of kung fu... tai chi, hsing yi, or pau kua...
View Quote
seconding that, but with a qualifier. Nearly ALL styles contain grappling techniques - some just emphasize it more than others. At high levels, even tae kwon do (if not totally sportified) practitioners study throws and holds. Let me stress, befoe I go on: don't be focused completely on the "name" on the sign. The instructor and the training environment is everything. Ask to watch a class or a few and see if that is what you want. Watch the more experienced guys and see if that is how you want to be. I quoted and agreed with mangu67 becasue the odds are that a Chinese style - even the "external" styles, will offer you plenty of what you are looking for. Of course, the "internal" styles will emphasize it a lot more. This kind if thing really defies categorization, so again - visit the school. As for non-Chinese arts that focus more on grappling and "internal" techniques, you may want to also look at the Japanese art of "Aikido" or its Korean equivalent "Hapkido." As for Judo, be aware that that is a sport, not really a martial art. Ju Jitsi is essentially the practical side of Judo (I beleive Judo the sport derived from Ju Jitsu). Still, the falls and SOME of the throws you have learned apply universally - but you MAY have picked up some bad habits. There is also the immensely popular Brazilian Ju Jitsu - but, as with anything "popular" there are more BS schools springing up than good ones. Good luck. Just remember, there is no policing agency that can stop any schmo from declaring his own style or variant and opening up a martial arts studio.
View Quote
yeah, what he said!!! all valid points, and all things i should have said... i should also mention that im no "master"... those guys can do some really frightening stuff... i might add that with the internal styles, there is no quick and easy... be ready to train HARD... when i used to attend classes, we would see people come in looking for the quick and easy... they would last a couple of weeks to a couple of months, then you would never see them again... people watch movies and think "hey, i wanna fight like that guy!!! i wanna throw kicks over my head!!!"... thats hollywood... try that nonsense in a real fight and youre in for a rude awakening... you have to walk before you can run, and just like life, you only get out of martial arts what you put into it... you can go as far as you want... start slow, with big techniques, and make sure the mechanics are correct... as you become better with a technique, start to go faster and make the technique smaller... this progresses until you have a very small, fast technique that maintains all the power of a large technique - now it is simply more compact... im running off at the mouth... i will add, however, that like adam white said, ask to sit in on some classes... beware of instructors who act like their shit doesnt stink... and do some research on the school and the style... not all schools, styles, or techniques are equal, and not all work for everyone on every occasion... take into account what the school expects from its students, what you expect and want to get out of training, how much of a personal investment you want to make in your training, etc etc... ok... shutting up now...
Link Posted: 12/30/2003 3:50:11 PM EDT
As the others said, ask to watch some classes before you sign up to make sure it is a style you are really interested in. Most places will let you take a class or two so you can see if you like it. Here's a tip for you - if you walk in and spot dozens of little 10 year old black belts running around - run away ! It is more than likely a belt factory just looking to get your money.
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