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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 7/19/2008 9:27:14 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 9:28:24 AM EST by kill-9]
I'm thinking of finally upgrading to hi-def. My question is, why shouldn't I just go buy the cheapest 1080P set I can find? For example:

www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=7081021

Other than maybe some input jacks or such, if a TV does 1080P what's the difference? Is there some other specification that contributes to set quality?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:30:53 AM EST
Contrast ratio is another biggie.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:32:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 9:39:23 AM EST by thelastgunslinger]

Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
Contrast ratio is another biggie.


Big +1.

All 1080p displays are not created equal.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:34:09 AM EST

Originally Posted By thelastgunslinger:

Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
Contrast ratio is another biggie.


Big +1.

All 1080p dispolays are not created equal.


There's also a refresh delay, how long it takes the LCD or plasma to change colors. Too long and the images can blur.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:37:27 AM EST
Go look at some of them. As the price goes down, the conrast ratio and response time goes down.

The cheaper TV's have fewer connections and options. If all you are wanting is a basic HD TV, then that might be enough for you. Might also consider the warranty.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:38:05 AM EST
I'd go bigger than 42" also. Get a 52"+ and you will know why
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:38:14 AM EST
I think they call it color depth but some dont have the whitest whites or darkest blacks (that sounded racist).

Its best to be able to compare them side by side. Take special note on sharpness of picture. Some of those cheap ones barely qualify to even have the letters HD on them.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:38:53 AM EST
OK, so far what I've heard is that I should consider contrast ratio and refresh/response time. Are these typically printed on the side of the box?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:40:39 AM EST

Originally Posted By kill-9:
OK, so far what I've heard is that I should consider contrast ratio and refresh/response time. Are these typically printed on the side of the box?


Contrast ratio usually is, the bigger the number the better. Response time can be tougher to find.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:42:06 AM EST
Contrast ratio is more a marketing ploy than an industry standard of measurement.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:47:54 AM EST
the numbers are listed but another challenge is that the numbers are not standardized. one brands contrast doesn't always equal the next brand.

Use your eyes. watch for a dark scene, does the black appear black on the screen or is there a gray tint to the screen. what happens to the picture as you step off to the side.

Ideally shop somewhere that can show you a satellite feed or cable so you can see something other than the most perfect bluray signal on the tv.

these are things you should notice a difference on even if shopping at Walmart.

Link Posted: 7/19/2008 9:56:34 AM EST
Another thing I ran into looking for televisions is that in the show room the contrast is turned up to 100 because it looks like shit under the store's halogen lighting. Contrast that high would burn out the TV in no time. So keep that in mind. Try to find a a Best Buy where they have their TV's in a dark room and play with the contrast and brightness.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:06:35 AM EST
Brightness for use in sunlit rooms, contrast ration, HDMI inputs, sound quality, universal remote, ...
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:29:53 AM EST
You get what you pay for. Or, "Buy crappy products, get crappy results" to rip off a phrase.


CJ
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:16:02 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
You get what you pay for. Or, "Buy crappy products, get crappy results" to rip off a phrase.


That's a buying philosophy that sometimes simply isn't true. That's why I asked for specific, quantifiable numbers by which to compare.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 4:15:15 PM EST
I've been involved in electronics for 33 years in total up to this point. I've done repair work on various items on both an informal and a professional basis for about 20 years now.

I've fixed (or attempted to fix) an enormous variety of electronic gadgets from budget brand
home electronics (TVs, VCRs, stereos, what have you...) all the way up to some
mind-numbingly expensive electronic devices that easily top 5000 dollars per pound in
average value, including military radios and even some avionics.

I can assure you, it IS true that when it comes to electronics, you truly do get what you pay for when it comes to build quality and reliability.

Regarding that specific product and the link to it, there are reviews posted for it.

Why don't you go read those reviews?

I wouldn't buy it. I'm not rich enough to be able to afford to be a fool with my money.


CJ
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 7:30:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 7:32:22 PM EST by JD_Ruger_fan]
You can easily get good TVs online on the cheap by browsing deal sites such as fatwallet.com.

I would recommend taking into account what people have said about contrast and response time. Response time is especially important if you'll be watching a lot of sports as some bad tvs may blur the image a little bit.

It's very easy to check for TV reviews, just type the model number into Google.

If you're looking for a budget TV, I have had very good experiences with Westinghouse. I bought myself one and also, one for my parents and I've had almost no trouble.

I haven't kept up with the TV broadcast signals, but it may not even be that important to get 1080p yet and you can save there too (unless you're going right to Blu-ray). The last football season, and college basketball season, the highest broadcast I saw was 720p (Fox) while CBS, for example, was mostly in 1080i. This may change soon, but I don't know. I also have had lots of people say that at 42", the difference between 720p and 1080p is almost not worth the cost.

It's good you're doing research. Just be patient and make sure you'll get a TV you enjoy.

Edit: Another thing: under NO circumstances should you spend money on expensive HDMI monster cables and such. Go to monoprice.com and save yourself a bunch while at the same time, losing no quality.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 8:16:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By JD_Ruger_fan:
You can easily get good TVs online on the cheap by browsing deal sites such as fatwallet.com.

I would recommend taking into account what people have said about contrast and response time. Response time is especially important if you'll be watching a lot of sports as some bad tvs may blur the image a little bit.

It's very easy to check for TV reviews, just type the model number into Google.

If you're looking for a budget TV, I have had very good experiences with Westinghouse. I bought myself one and also, one for my parents and I've had almost no trouble.

I haven't kept up with the TV broadcast signals, but it may not even be that important to get 1080p yet and you can save there too (unless you're going right to Blu-ray). The last football season, and college basketball season, the highest broadcast I saw was 720p (Fox) while CBS, for example, was mostly in 1080i. This may change soon, but I don't know. I also have had lots of people say that at 42", the difference between 720p and 1080p is almost not worth the cost.

It's good you're doing research. Just be patient and make sure you'll get a TV you enjoy.

Edit: Another thing: under NO circumstances should you spend money on expensive HDMI monster cables and such. Go to monoprice.com and save yourself a bunch while at the same time, losing no quality.


Thanks!
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 10:23:31 PM EST
There is a noticeable difference between 720 and 1080i. A lot of major network broadcasts are 1080i. When a PBS or other channel drops that back to 720i or 480i it is very poor in comparison. Bluray discs in 1080p are awesome!

Mine is a 52" SHARP. If you are getting a smaller screen and watch it from far away, the lower resolution may not be noticed but I wouldn't count on it.

If this is your first HDTV, you may feel good about the upgrade from 480i to 720i TV. But you are cheating yourself.

Get a 1080p TV with an HDMI inout and decent sound.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:01:33 AM EST
height=8
Originally Posted By Mike_Mills:
There is a noticeable difference between 720 and 1080i. A lot of major network broadcasts are 1080i. When a PBS or other channel drops that back to 720i or 480i it is very poor in comparison. Bluray discs in 1080p are awesome!

Mine is a 52" SHARP. If you are getting a smaller screen and watch it from far away, the lower resolution may not be noticed but I wouldn't count on it.

If this is your first HDTV, you may feel good about the upgrade from 480i to 720i TV. But you are cheating yourself.

Get a 1080p TV with an HDMI inout and decent sound.


1. There is no such thing as 720i. 480i is regular every day standard definition.
2. 420p is NOT HDTV. For all intents and purposes, it is standard definition. (Technically, it is "Enhanced Definition).
2. 1080i ad 720p are very close, but most people will tell you that 720p is better than 1080i. It doesn't really matter because a TV that supports one will support the other, so really the question in buying a TV is 720p/1080i versus 1080p.
3. To back up what I think I said in my previous post, depending on the size of the TV and distance from the TV that you will be, you may not get the full benefit of 1080p. If you look at the chart below, you will see that if you get a 40 inch TV, you will have to sit less than 5 feet away to get the full benefit of 1080p.

www.hdforindies.com/uploaded_images/resolution_chart-790251.jpg
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:05:42 AM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
You get what you pay for. Or, "Buy crappy products, get crappy results" to rip off a phrase.


CJ


Yeah but you have to remember the popular Arfcomism that applies to anything: "I want high-end performance but I want it for pennies on the dollar"

You see it with everything one can purchase. "I want Colt reliability but I can only afford an M&A parts kit..."
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 7:16:01 AM EST
Bottom line is -

If you like the picture and it is a great deal then buy it.

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