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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/8/2004 5:02:49 AM EST
Background info: My friends parents used to raise all KINDS of fowl. Chickens, turkey, geese, pheasent, things with feathers even I had never heard of. They would kill and clean whatever their taste buds requested at the time and didnt worry about it because they had raised the birds themselves.

My question, lets say someone raises pheasants. To go out to the chicken coop and kill the pheasant you raise is ok any time of the year. But, what if you take the pheasant you raised, and let him go on your property, then 24 hours later went out to "hunt" the pheasant. Would that now be illegal and considered hunting out of season, or would the fact that it was your bird you let go be ok?
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 5:10:36 AM EST
I would think a lot depends on if you marked the bird (showing it as a pen raised one) and/or if it is a native species to the area it is in. I notice you are from Kansas. I assume you all have pheasants there already, and I would assume that unless the bird is marked in some way it would be difficult to distinguish it from a native bird. At the very least you need to contact your game and fish department and ask them.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 5:14:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
I would think a lot depends on if you marked the bird (showing it as a pen raised one) and/or if it is a native species to the area it is in. I notice you are from Kansas. I assume you all have pheasants there already, and I would assume that unless the bird is marked in some way it would be difficult to distinguish it from a native bird. At the very least you need to contact your game and fish department and ask them.



Thats exactly what I would do, but this is actually more a theoretical question. I live in a subdivision, I get funny looks and neighbors shooing kids inside just stepping outside with the ole scattergun.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 5:28:34 AM EST
In Florida

PERSONS EXEMPT FROM LICENSE AND PERMIT REQUIREMENTS
The following persons are exempt and do not have to obtain a Hunting License, Florida Waterfowl Permit, Turkey Permit, Wildlife Management Area Permit, Archery Permit, Muzzleloading Gun Permit and Migratory Bird Permit.

Any persons hunting in their county of residence on their homestead or the homestead of their spouse or minor child or any minor child hunting on the homestead of their parent.

I would contact Fish and Game Dept for your state.
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 6:36:26 AM EST
i train retrievers and have dealt with issues like this alot.

every state is different and you need to contact the kansas state department of wildlife.

i have a game bird license to keep fowl. to keep domestically raised gamebirds (pheasant, quail, tame bred mallards and the like) for training purposes.

i have to band each bird with y individual band to mark it when i go to release it or train with it.

any deviation could result in my ticketing for posession of a bird out of season.

i have to keep reciepts of sales and buying as well to verify they are domestically bred.

a person on their own land (LAND OWNER) not brother in law...not son in law..etc..
can usually hunt critters without a license..but must buy the necessary tags or stamps.

call your local possum cop...
Link Posted: 9/8/2004 7:27:27 AM EST

Originally Posted By pen:
In Florida

PERSONS EXEMPT FROM LICENSE AND PERMIT REQUIREMENTS
The following persons are exempt and do not have to obtain a Hunting License, Florida Waterfowl Permit, Turkey Permit, Wildlife Management Area Permit, Archery Permit, Muzzleloading Gun Permit and Migratory Bird Permit.

Any persons hunting in their county of residence on their homestead or the homestead of their spouse or minor child or any minor child hunting on the homestead of their parent.

I would contact Fish and Game Dept for your state.



Except the season limits typically still stand for these sorts of provisions. New Hampshire has a similar provision, but the season is still in effect.

There are also provisions for agricultural businesses (farms) to hunt out of season to reduce or eliminate pest animals. In MA, there is a special permit involved. The hunters must be employees of the farm, and normal weapon restrictions are upheld, so in Massachusetts, you still couldn't hunt with a rifle, though a shotgun with slugs, bow or muzzleloader would be OK. Individual hunting licenses might remain a requirement as well.

Call your local fish and game department, they'll give you the straight poop.
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