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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 7/24/2014 12:48:06 AM EST
Hello,

As a guy who only flies when his tray table is in the upright position and seatbelt securely fastened, AKA passenger, I watched this video and had some questions for the experts.

Qantas 32 video

As an out of my lane observer, it seems to me that the pilots were behind the power curve and airplane. It looked like they spent more time on the ECAMS computer than flying the plane. Is this more of a problem with Airbus products than Boeing? Or, is automation becoming the norm? The video made it look like the flight crew were heros for checking control surfaces about an hour after the engine grenaded; wouldn't that be one of the first things you would want to check?

The comments from the pilot about never dreaming that something like this could happen make me want to slap the shit out of him. I'm a cop: we call this going to a call fat, dumb and happy. If you're lucky, you don't die or wind up seriously screwed up. Luck isn't a tactical plan and I don't want to hear my pilot has never thought this could happen and is trying to figure out what to do on the fly. Am I being a dick? Do I have unreasonable expectations?

It seems to me these guys got lucky; I'd like to hear from you professionals if I am wrong and where my ignorance shows. Thanks for your knowledge.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:07:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2014 2:21:45 AM EST by BillofRights]
Airline pilots have to learn, and practice, and successfully demonstrate every conceivable emergency that can happen, on the airplane they are being trained on.

It's more information than you can imagine.

Often, an emergency doesn't happen the way checklist says it will. Especially, on new designs. The engineers and designers are not always 100% knowledgable on how one system will effect another.

It's very complicated, and it would take me a few hours to even try to explain it to you. There isn't really an analogy that you could easily relate to.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:21:30 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Airline pilots have to learn, and practice, and successfully demonstrate every conceivable emergency that can happen, on the airplane they are being trained on.

It's more information than you can possibly imagine.

Often, an emergency doesn't happen the way checklist says it will. Especially, on new designs. The engineers and designers are not always 100% knowledgable on how one system will effect another.

It's very complicated, and it would take me a few hours to even try to explain it to you. There isn't really an analogy that you could easily relate to.
View Quote


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:27:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2014 2:32:29 AM EST by BillofRights]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By vojta:
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Airline pilots have to learn, and practice, and successfully demonstrate every conceivable emergency that can happen, on the airplane they are being trained on.

It's more information than you can possibly imagine.

Often, an emergency doesn't happen the way checklist says it will. Especially, on new designs. The engineers and designers are not always 100% knowledgable on how one system will effect another.

It's very complicated, and it would take me a few hours to even try to explain it to you. There isn't really an analogy that you could easily relate to.


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...


Really? . I'm sorry, but you sound really rude, and not at all smart. You are either lying about your IQ, or you're one of those Rainman types with no social skills. If you aren't completely 'tarded, I'm sure you can find what you're looking for on the WWW.


Alright, I'm sort of intrigued how a 140+ IQ genius becomes a cop. IM me proof of your IQ, and I'll explain everything to you.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:35:04 AM EST
So, if I don't provide proof of my IQ, no explanation of why the pilots did what they did? Got it. I'm the stupid one.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:40:27 AM EST
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved on a college-level class was an A-, so, well you can figure it out. I became a cop because I wanted to help people. Before I decided I couldn't do without women, I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until they found out my left eye vision was 20-25, Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship offer when they found out I had asthma after 13. Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:45:42 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:
So, if I don't provide proof of my IQ, no explanation of why the pilots did what they did? Got it. I'm the stupid one.
View Quote


Anyone can claim anything on the internet. If you want someone to spend time on something, the least you can do is start out polite and honest. It establishes credibility and interest.

Basically, we would identify the correct engine, shut down fuel to it, refer to the checklist, verify that remaining systems were transferred, then decide the next course of action and complete other necessary checklists and briefings.


Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:47:45 AM EST
lol
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:52:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2014 2:54:08 AM EST by DvlDog]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved on a college-level class was an A-, so, well you can figure it out. I became a cop because I wanted to help people. Before I decided I couldn't do without women, I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until they found out my left eye vision was 20-25, Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship offer when they found out I had asthma after 13. Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.
View Quote



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:55:55 AM EST
Go back and read reports and discussion threads on the Air France 447 crash a few years ago.

There's a very different method of operation of the modern Airbus transport aircraft. To many, it's not reassuring.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:56:50 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BillofRights:


Anyone can claim anything on the internet. If you want someone to spend time on something, the least you can do is start out polite and honest. It establishes credibility and interest.

B
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Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Originally Posted By vojta:
So, if I don't provide proof of my IQ, no explanation of why the pilots did what they did? Got it. I'm the stupid one.


Anyone can claim anything on the internet. If you want someone to spend time on something, the least you can do is start out polite and honest. It establishes credibility and interest.

B


I said I was ignorant, as a guy that just flew as a passenger. I admitted my lack of knowledge and expected a professional response. If you viewed my initial query as anything less than the 95th percentile of proper english grammar and composition, you are severely mistaken. I am ignorant; not stupid. I don't fly airplanes for a living, much less heavy transport planes. Such planes that those of us unwashed would expect the best and brightest, or at least most experienced and talented, pilots of an airplane to pilot.

I had specific questions, you attacked my ability to comprehend and told me it was much to complicated for me to understand. I am willing to listen to your explanation. I am not willing to be told I cannot understand.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 2:58:58 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DvlDog:



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.
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Originally Posted By DvlDog:
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved on a college-level class was an A-, so, well you can figure it out. I became a cop because I wanted to help people. Before I decided I couldn't do without women, I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until they found out my left eye vision was 20-25, Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship offer when they found out I had asthma after 13. Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.


I'm 45. Bill of Rights claimed I wasn't capable of understanding the complexity of the problem. Perhaps, I over-reacted.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 3:05:26 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Go back and read reports and discussion threads on the Air France 447 crash a few years ago.

There's a very different method of operation of the modern Airbus transport aircraft. To many, it's not reassuring.
View Quote


I have. It's why I try to fly Boeing wherever I go. Yet, on Friday, I fly from SFO to Dublin on an Aer Lingus A330-200 and it troubles me. Wait, it doesn't trouble me as much as those guys on Qantas 32. Did they ever declare an emergency? The video is unclear on that part. They had six pilots in the cockpit, but it took them over an hour to send one back to look at the big holes in the wing? I'm glad they got all the ECAMS alerts cleared in 55 minutes. What if they had concentrated on evaluating the damage and landing that porker? What if they had turned around and used the remaining hydraulics to drop the gear and flaps before it became impossible to so so due to damage? I guess the ECAMS never brought those things up...
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 3:19:26 AM EST
I know what I would have tried to do: land as soon as possible first priority while responding to the emergencies.

It reminds me of the Alaska 261: instead of returning to the departure airport as soon as possible, they troubleshot the system en route until it failed catastrophically.

Another is Eastern 855: instead of landing at Nassau with one engine out they chose to return to Miami...and lost the other two along the way.

Hindsight is 20/20, but there is also foresight.

Moral of the stories to me: never bet against Murphy.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 3:26:54 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 6:14:37 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved..... I wanted to help people. .....I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until..... Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship ...... My iq is..... Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.
View Quote


No it doesn't, but you clearly explained how your life is defined by not making it and that you couldn't do what you wanted to do so you settled for being a cop. Frankly, the people I want to be cops are helpful citizens who want to contribute to society rather than people who settle for it after their life sputters out and goes nowhere. Go pull over a speeding soccer mom and impress her with your authority, because you failed miserably in impressing anybody here thanks to your astounding lack of people skills and general ignorance.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 7:01:09 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2014 7:04:39 AM EST by chadjetlag]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Morgan321:


No it doesn't, but you clearly explained how your life is defined by not making it and that you couldn't do what you wanted to do so you settled for being a cop. Frankly, the people I want to be cops are helpful citizens who want to contribute to society rather than people who settle for it after their life sputters out and goes nowhere. Go pull over a speeding soccer mom and impress her with your authority, because you failed miserably in impressing anybody here thanks to your astounding lack of people skills and general ignorance.
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Originally Posted By Morgan321:
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved..... I wanted to help people. .....I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until..... Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship ...... My iq is..... Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.


No it doesn't, but you clearly explained how your life is defined by not making it and that you couldn't do what you wanted to do so you settled for being a cop. Frankly, the people I want to be cops are helpful citizens who want to contribute to society rather than people who settle for it after their life sputters out and goes nowhere. Go pull over a speeding soccer mom and impress her with your authority, because you failed miserably in impressing anybody here thanks to your astounding lack of people skills and general ignorance.


3rd post was one of the most arrogant posts I have ever seen but I have always wanted to use this:


Link Posted: 7/24/2014 8:20:45 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:


I'm 45. Bill of Rights claimed I wasn't capable of understanding the complexity of the problem. Perhaps, I over-reacted.
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Originally Posted By vojta:
Originally Posted By DvlDog:
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved on a college-level class was an A-, so, well you can figure it out. I became a cop because I wanted to help people. Before I decided I couldn't do without women, I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until they found out my left eye vision was 20-25, Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship offer when they found out I had asthma after 13. Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.


I'm 45. Bill of Rights claimed I wasn't capable of understanding the complexity of the problem. Perhaps, I over-reacted.


No he told you it would take several hours to explain, not that your incapable.

Stop acting like a whiny 2 year old, you might be 45, but your acting like a small child.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 9:41:04 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...
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Originally Posted By vojta:
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Airline pilots have to learn, and practice, and successfully demonstrate every conceivable emergency that can happen, on the airplane they are being trained on.

It's more information than you can possibly imagine.

Often, an emergency doesn't happen the way checklist says it will. Especially, on new designs. The engineers and designers are not always 100% knowledgable on how one system will effect another.

It's very complicated, and it would take me a few hours to even try to explain it to you. There isn't really an analogy that you could easily relate to.


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...


Mensa membership number?
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 9:42:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/24/2014 10:30:46 AM EST by Him]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By DvlDog:



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.
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Originally Posted By DvlDog:
Originally Posted By vojta:
Oh, the lowest grade I've ever achieved on a college-level class was an A-, so, well you can figure it out. I became a cop because I wanted to help people. Before I decided I couldn't do without women, I wanted to be a Jesuit priest. Air Force Academy recruiters loved me until they found out my left eye vision was 20-25, Navy Reserve pulled the scholarship offer when they found out I had asthma after 13. Still doesn't explain why the Qantas pilots did what they did.



Why do you feel the need to spell out the minutae of your imagined persona to a bunch of people who don't give a shit? You sound like you're about 14 which means you signed up for arfcom at 2. Lolz.


+1
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 10:53:33 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.
View Quote


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 11:55:21 AM EST
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 8:37:43 PM EST
They landed safely. At the end of the day, that's the important thing.

There has to be a balance in any emergency between recovering the aircraft before things get worse and taking the time to fully understand and deal with all the problems you face. My first instinct is generally to turn toward a suitable spot to land. Although, at a ~10 minutes of flight, they might have run off the end of the runway and killed everyone in a cartwheeling fireball, so waiting certainly had some potential benefits!
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 8:41:30 PM EST
You're a bit in over your head here, vojta. Demanding a short answer to such an event is not realistic if you want to know the truth. The number of varibles involved are huge. By the way, an emergency was delcared quickly after the engine explosion and it was pretty clear in the video.



Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By vojta:


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...
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Originally Posted By vojta:
Originally Posted By BillofRights:
Airline pilots have to learn, and practice, and successfully demonstrate every conceivable emergency that can happen, on the airplane they are being trained on.

It's more information than you can possibly imagine.

Often, an emergency doesn't happen the way checklist says it will. Especially, on new designs. The engineers and designers are not always 100% knowledgable on how one system will effect another.

It's very complicated, and it would take me a few hours to even try to explain it to you. There isn't really an analogy that you could easily relate to.


Yeah, you fail. If you can't explain what an airline pilot should do if a turbofan engine grenades, then you aren't the solution to my problem. That's totally non-technical, and a question a pilot who flies a turbofan heavy should be able to answer. I'm just a customer. I look at the youtube video of Shamrock 12, an Aer Lingus A330-200 engine out take-off, and compare it with this, which is much worse and think....

Really, try your best and explain it to this 140+ IQ guy. I've got plenty of time...

Link Posted: 7/25/2014 7:26:43 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By skipsan:


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair
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Originally Posted By skipsan:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.
Link Posted: 7/25/2014 6:30:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By skipsan:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.
You noted part of the problem: overweight. With gear, brake and flap damage, I'd rather do some math while in orbit after figuring out what works and what doesn't before shooting off the far end of the runway at 120kts.

Iirc, they stopped it ~100yds short of the end of the runway.
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 1:01:37 AM EST
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By skipsan:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.

Disagree. Unless there is major flight surface missing from the jet rushing back to Earth isn't generally the best course of action. I am curious why the A380 crew was so against burning some gas. They got the gear down, burn some holes and lighten the jet a bit to give yourself some more breathing room on landing.
Link Posted: 7/29/2014 5:07:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By skipsan:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By CFII:
I think they handled it very well. One pilot was always flying. One handled the FMS.

It was a literal worst case series of cascading failures. The aircraft landed in one piece, and is even probably reuseable.

Bravo.


Agreed except I wouldn't have remained in the air just to complete emergency procedures...proceed to nearest airfield and land (gross weight permitting) and perform emergency procedures en route.


The airplane was returned to service after an 18 month layup (10 months waiting for a berth in the repair shop) and $139 million repair charge.
A380 Repair


There was a lot more wrong/damaged with that aircraft than "just" the grenaded engine...another reason to get back to mother earth ASAP.

You don't just point it at the ground and hit the brakes. As Soon As Possible includes spending some time to evaluate the capabilities of the plane so you have an idea what is possible. Obviously that doesn't apply if it's pointing straight down and on fire, but if it's still flying, you owe it to everyone on board and everyone on the ground to understand what will happen when you act.
Link Posted: 7/30/2014 3:25:40 PM EST
What in creation is going on in this thread....sheesh
vojta, you are so far outside of your skill set it nearly gave my iPad cancer.
While some emergencies exist that require all procedures to be put on hold and land NOW, they are very few and far between.
Plus, your interpretation of how they handled the EICAS messages is totally skewed.
In these types of crew alerting systems, a single failure, such as an engine failure, causes multiple, sometimes pages of EICAS messages.
If you aren't immediately aware of the EXACT problem, a crew must attempt to determine root cause by evaluating these multiple messages in several ways.
I have flown airplanes who's EICAS systems were such that the original problem would be displayed, then "buried" by the resulting associated failures.
This could easily cause a task saturated crew to mis-identify the correct, and most critical failure.

PS. I've been alive for 45 years and have never encountered a single social encounter that required the stating of my or my associate's IQ number.
Link Posted: 7/30/2014 4:03:10 PM EST
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Originally Posted By brasilia:
What in creation is going on in this thread....sheesh
vojta, you are so far outside of your skill set it nearly gave my iPad cancer.
While some emergencies exist that require all procedures to be put on hold and land NOW, they are very few and far between.
Plus, your interpretation of how they handled the EICAS messages is totally skewed.
In these types of crew alerting systems, a single failure, such as an engine failure, causes multiple, sometimes pages of EICAS messages.
If you aren't immediately aware of the EXACT problem, a crew must attempt to determine root cause by evaluating these multiple messages in several ways.
I have flown airplanes who's EICAS systems were such that the original problem would be displayed, then "buried" by the resulting associated failures.
This could easily cause a task saturated crew to mis-identify the correct, and most critical failure.

PS. I've been alive for 45 years and have never encountered a single social encounter that required the stating of my or my associate's IQ number.
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Well, obviously you've never spent enough time in GD. It's a very useful thing to be able to throw around in there.
Link Posted: 7/30/2014 9:02:04 PM EST
Haha
Very true
Link Posted: 10/5/2014 1:53:31 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Gamma762:
Go back and read reports and discussion threads on the Air France 447 crash a few years ago.

There's a very different method of operation of the modern Airbus transport aircraft. To many, it's not reassuring.
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and by not reassuring he means absolutely fucking terrifying beyond belief.

Also wtf is up with the OP?
Link Posted: 10/5/2014 9:40:58 PM EST
Wow, I thought GD stayed out of the tech forums.

Who the hell knows their IQ?
Link Posted: 10/5/2014 11:16:09 PM EST
Wow, that plane had more severe damage than I realized from watching the news when it happened and watching the video that the OP posted. Look at the pictures of the damage here: http://www.businessinsider.com.au/frightening-photos-from-the-report-on-the-qantas-a380-incident-show-exactly-what-happened-2013-7#qantas-atsb-1

Personally, I'd say that that aircrew did a superb job of handling that mess and landing the plane in one piece.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 5:14:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/6/2014 5:14:44 PM EST by shotar]
This is not GD
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