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Posted: 8/31/2015 6:49:51 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 6:54:49 AM EST
Yes!
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 6:57:25 AM EST
Very cool, thanks for sharing.

Think you'd ever be interested in finding the record archives for the London Small Arms Co? I have a Martini-Henry I'd love to know more about!
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:00:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:03:08 AM EST
It was all good until the bottom of the post...

Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:03:14 AM EST
How in hell did they know an unknown soldier was jewish?

Thank you for the pics. Stationed overseas I was always awestruck when visiting war cemeteries.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:03:48 AM EST
Cool, thanks for sharing it,
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:03:54 AM EST
Wow, very well indeed.
It is a somber experience to think of those who came before us and did so much.

As an aside, is it wrong that I read what you write in a British accent. I just watched an episode of "Viscous" this morning.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:03:59 AM EST
Great post !
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:07:53 AM EST
Thanks OP
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:10:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 7:11:18 AM EST by AA717driver]
I consider myself a tough guy, emotionally. But, when I see those cemetaries, I always tear up. I am not worthy to walk among their graves.

Thanks for the tour and looked like a wonderful trip.

TC

ETA: FC Chelsea must have a lot of players from Kuwait...
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:12:34 AM EST
That place is beautiful. Thanks for the pics. Nice bike too.




Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:14:12 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
How in hell did they know an unknown soldier was jewish?

Thank you for the pics. Stationed overseas I was always awestruck when visiting war cemeteries.
View Quote

He was circumcised?

Thanks for the pics op, they are cool
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:19:53 AM EST
The British do war memorials very well.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:25:02 AM EST
Very nice, thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:25:15 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:26:14 AM EST
Beautiful photos of a fitting final resting place for these heroes.

Thank you for a very fine post Bradders.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:28:07 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:29:50 AM EST
Very cool--thanks for posting!
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:30:48 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:31:06 AM EST
Very interesting, OP. Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:32:54 AM EST
Thanks for posting. What a beautiful memorial and cemetery.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:34:17 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:35:45 AM EST
Thanks for sharing your pics, hard to believe there are 250,000 people buried there.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:38:21 AM EST
Question,

And I mean no disrespect, but how many women went "missing" during the war? I am assuming that they were military veterans, and usually one goes missing either from capture or you body was utterly destroyed from a shell and you just disappeared or you drown at the bottom of a body of water etc.

Were there many women in areas of combat that were vaporized or drowned and therefore disappeared?

Or would a percentage (small I know) just say "fuck it, I'm out" and just drop out? (AWOL) Again no disrespect meant, I was just wondering how many women went "missing" during a war that were due to enemy engagement of some sort that qualified them for the wall/memorial.

Let me reiterate, I mean no disrespect to the women that served and were included to the memorial, I just wondered how a woman came to the distinction during the war.

Perhaps they were on a ship that was sunk?
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:47:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:48:20 AM EST
Thank you for posting those.

Looks like it was a good day.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:50:06 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:56:20 AM EST
Thanks for sharing, great pictures & a nice bike!!
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:00:07 AM EST
Long ago, in another life, I spent a year in Montgomery, AL doing the camp follower thing while my boyfriend was at Air Command and Staff College. On one of the routes through the city, between Maxwell AFB and Gunter AFS, there was a large municipal cemetery with a small section containing the graves of Brits killed in flight training accidents during the War. I'd always stop and spend a few minutes reading the names. I'd think of these young men resting so far from their homes, their loved ones lacking the solace of even a grave to visit. And I'd cry.

We remember yours too, Bradders. We remember yours.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:00:35 AM EST
Very cool Bradders. Thanks for sharing
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:12:56 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:14:25 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Long ago, in another life, I spent a year in Montgomery, AL doing the camp follower thing while my boyfriend was at Air Command and Staff College. On one of the routes through the city, between Maxwell AFB and Gunter AFS, there was a large municipal cemetery with a small section containing the graves of Brits killed in flight training accidents during the War. I'd always stop and spend a few minutes reading the names. I'd think of these young men resting so far from their homes, their loved ones lacking the solace of even a grave to visit. And I'd cry.


View Quote
Your post reminds me of the small POW cemetery at Ft Gordon. About 20 Germans iIIRC. Visited a few times when stationed there.
Always made me a bit sad in an unusual way.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:27:39 AM EST
Thanks Bradders, I didn't know that cemetery existed.

Do you know how many MIAs are in the American Cemetery
and if any are from operation Overlord?

(off to google)

My father's father was MIA at Normandy, therefore, it appears I have another
stop to add to my list for our family's future tour of GB and Europe.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:29:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 8:39:31 AM EST by SteelonSteel]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
How in hell did they know an unknown soldier was jewish?

Thank you for the pics. Stationed overseas I was always awestruck when visiting war cemeteries.
View Quote


I wondered the same thing. Missing dog tags would likely lose the ID and the man's known religion. Perhaps they found something in his effects but without a name. Or sadly I thought of a delirious soldier in a hospital ward (influenza) praying in Hebrew or Yiddish, etc. Hard telling at this point.


ETA I'm quietly and humbly impressed with the grand scale of those monuments to the fallen. They were done with a lot of class.

As far as those MIA female service women. We lost a fair amount of ships at sea, recovery of the lost is quite difficult and sometimes impossible. I saw one of the first was a WASP, a good chance she went down at sea on a transport mission. Then there were the bombings and fires in England.

RIP.

I live in the Saratoga area of NY. I'm sure we have more than a few graves here from the Revolution and before. There are monuments on the battlefield but it's been a while since I've walked the field.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:34:34 AM EST
Nice looking monuments to fallen hero's.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:59:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:04:51 AM EST
We need to get Pogba in, sharpish!

Nice bike Bradders.



Great pictures as well thanks.

Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:09:54 AM EST
Thank you Bradders. Can you tell us more about Gunmakers' Lane?
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:10:03 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bradders:


I believe that many of the WW2 dead were exhumed and reburied at the American Military Cemetery at Cambridge
See here
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Cambridge_American_Cemetery_and_Memorial.jpg
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bradders:
Originally Posted By Ibn_Huq:
Thanks Bradders, I didn't know that cemetery existed.

Do you know how many MIAs are in the American Cemetery
and if any are from operation Overlord?

(off to google)

My father's father was MIA at Normandy, therefore, it appears I have another
stop to add to my list for our family's future tour of GB and Europe.


I believe that many of the WW2 dead were exhumed and reburied at the American Military Cemetery at Cambridge
See here
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Cambridge_American_Cemetery_and_Memorial.jpg



Thanks again

Cambridge is already on the schedule (Wife did a summer semester during law school)
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:17:48 AM EST
Thank you, Bradders. May the souls of all those men and women rest in peace.

Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:22:55 AM EST
Thanks for the photos
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:31:14 AM EST
Thank you for posting.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:57:21 AM EST
Thank you for the pictures.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:58:01 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:01:34 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:14:20 AM EST
We did the same in WW2 to a certain degree.

Black men were often in supply units, ie loading ships, a lot of them were in motor transport, trucking supplies from the beach to the front. It took some pushing to get all black infantry, artillery and other combat units into action.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:25:08 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lightning_P38:
Pvt Bennet was assigned to a colored unit, as near as I can tell. Looks like his unit was made up mostly of colored men from the same I area I am from.

Shortly after the US got involved in WWI the government had to stop accepting black volunteers, because all of the quota for colored soldiers had been filled.

There were colored combat arms units in WWI, but most colored soldiers were assigned to labor battalions and other menial roles.
View Quote

Thanks. The US Army ignored its own history of over 150k blacks serving in the Union Army during the Civil War, the 9th and 10th Cav as well as the 24th and 25th Infantry during the frontier days (and Spanish American War) as well as the American black units that Pershing penny parceled out to the Western Allies.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:31:00 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Sylvan:
How in hell did they know an unknown soldier was jewish?

Thank you for the pics. Stationed overseas I was always awestruck when visiting war cemeteries.
View Quote


It was done by percentage according to the guy at Madingley.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:34:47 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PlaneJane:
Long ago, in another life, I spent a year in Montgomery, AL doing the camp follower thing while my boyfriend was at Air Command and Staff College. On one of the routes through the city, between Maxwell AFB and Gunter AFS, there was a large municipal cemetery with a small section containing the graves of Brits killed in flight training accidents during the War. I'd always stop and spend a few minutes reading the names. I'd think of these young men resting so far from their homes, their loved ones lacking the solace of even a grave to visit. And I'd cry.

We remember yours too, Bradders. We remember yours.
View Quote


At the Madingley cemetery, it was intended for WWII war dead, but three American pilots from the 1980s and 1990s are buried there at the request of HMG due to the fact their wives were British.

I went to the cemetery where John Magee is buried in Lincolnshire. At least two or three Luftwaffe crews are buried there.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 10:37:06 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ibn_Huq:
Thanks Bradders, I didn't know that cemetery existed.

Do you know how many MIAs are in the American Cemetery
and if any are from operation Overlord?

(off to google)

My father's father was MIA at Normandy, therefore, it appears I have another
stop to add to my list for our family's future tour of GB and Europe.
View Quote


Very possible that your family is memorialized at Madingley. Many of the casualties from Exercise Tiger are also there. The families of Exercise Tiger casualties were often told their loved ones died at Normandy.
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