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Posted: 5/1/2015 7:59:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 8:34:39 AM EDT by simplemitch]
Hey all,
I'm looking for recommendations on a powered ethernet repeater to be used in potentially life and death situations. We're using cat5e shielded cable and we'd like to achieve runs up to 2000', but we'll take what we can get. We have all the tools to make our own shielded cables to achieve whatever lengths are needed. It's a data only connection. And it'd be highly beneficial if it can run on 12V, because we'd like to put it in a Pelican type case with a dedicated battery system for field deployment.

I'm at work right now, but I'll respond to questions as fast as possible.



Edited to correct distance.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:07:20 AM EDT
While it is certainly out of spec - running at 100 mbps over 1000 feet of cat6a is doable with quality gear. I have done it

A cisco 4948 switch would be my recommendation. They do 120v 220v and do have DC power supply options. If you are talking about running it off a vehicle power outlet, that probably isn't feasible with a 4948.

If you are really interested i can try a cheaper HP switch and a box of 1000ft cat6 and see if it works

Running gigabit or 10 gigabit at 1000 feet would only be reliable with fiber instead of copper.

Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:10:26 AM EDT
I'm not dealing directly with the gear involved, but I'd be fairly confident that it's probably running 10/100Mbps. Its a signal line for a portable X-ray scanner.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:16:30 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By simplemitch:
I'm not dealing directly with the gear involved, but I'd be fairly confident that it's probably running 10/100Mbps. Its a signal line for a portable X-ray scanner.
View Quote


Are you using portable X-ray generators or do you have 120v at both locations? Also, line of sight?
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:20:14 AM EDT
The right way to do this is with fiber optic converters.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:21:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 8:27:09 AM EDT by woodsie]
I'm currently running four 3MP IP Cameras off the remote end of this. So far VERY reliable with no noticeable latency. The extender is completely transparent to the network.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002CLKFTG/ref=mp_s_a_1_5?qid=1430482652&sr=8-5&pi=SL75_QL70&keywords=ethernet+extender

ETA if this really is life or death there are more expensive versions of this same idea that might be more robust but you'll have to Google it. I'm on my phone.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:36:06 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By _Matt_:


Are you using portable X-ray generators or do you have 120v at both locations? Also, line of sight?
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By _Matt_:
Originally Posted By simplemitch:
I'm not dealing directly with the gear involved, but I'd be fairly confident that it's probably running 10/100Mbps. Its a signal line for a portable X-ray scanner.


Are you using portable X-ray generators or do you have 120v at both locations? Also, line of sight?



It's an X-ray plate that goes on one side of target and a source that goes on other. Both have self contained battery systems. Not always line of sight.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:40:43 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By desmando:
The right way to do this is with fiber optic converters.
View Quote



Asking you is probably faster than googling, so:
What kind of distances can be achieved via this route?
What about durability/ruggedness? This will see frequent use, often in harsh environments.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:42:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 8:45:22 AM EDT by simplemitch]
A colleague just found this:
ethernet to coax

Claims 8,530 ft!!!! I see now that distance is limited by speed.....
What's your opinions on this?



NVM, it looks like it wouldn't gain much.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 8:53:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 8:56:19 AM EDT by kc8ykd]
how about an ethernet ->fiber adapter?

you'll probably want to armor the cable, but that should give you all the speed and distance you require.

http://www.amazon.com/MC200CM-Converter-1000Mbps-multi-mode-mountable/dp/B003AVRLZI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430484645&sr=8-1&keywords=ethernet+fiber

This adapter runs off 12v, either wall wart or it wouldn't be difficult to direct-wire to a battery. looks like it has no moving parts to fail as well.

If it's in a very rugged environment, i believe Netgear has a line of products made for .mil applications that have no moving parts and are supposed to be resistant to high temps (ie. desert use).

desmando, said it first.. 500m, looks durable, weak point will be the cable. a tough sheathing or metal conduit would be my choice. if it's conduit, you could delink the sections you need per each application, blow a stringer through with a shop vac or something, then pull the amount of fiber cable you need through it pretty easily, even with bends in the conduit.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 9:07:01 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By kc8ykd:
how about an ethernet ->fiber adapter?

you'll probably want to armor the cable, but that should give you all the speed and distance you require.

http://www.amazon.com/MC200CM-Converter-1000Mbps-multi-mode-mountable/dp/B003AVRLZI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430484645&sr=8-1&keywords=ethernet+fiber

This adapter runs off 12v, either wall wart or it wouldn't be difficult to direct-wire to a battery. looks like it has no moving parts to fail as well.

If it's in a very rugged environment, i believe Netgear has a line of products made for .mil applications that have no moving parts and are supposed to be resistant to high temps (ie. desert use).

desmando, said it first.. 500m, looks durable, weak point will be the cable. a tough sheathing or metal conduit would be my choice. if it's conduit, you could delink the sections you need per each application, blow a stringer through with a shop vac or something, then pull the amount of fiber cable you need through it pretty easily, even with bends in the conduit.
View Quote



This could be a viable option. but, a question:

It seems fiber (like every other cable) comes in 1000' foot spools. Could I get a 2000' run by doing this: device> 6 inch ethernet>Fiber adapter>1000' fiber> what goes here? >1000' fiber>adapter> 6" ethernet>device.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 9:10:44 AM EDT
I can get fiber optic cable in any length you want. Distance is equipment dependent.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 9:19:52 AM EDT
maybe something like this would help...

https://www.ubnt.com/products/

You will probably need line of sight though.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 9:36:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 9:37:34 AM EDT by Solarus]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By simplemitch:



This could be a viable option. but, a question:

It seems fiber (like every other cable) comes in 1000' foot spools. Could I get a 2000' run by doing this: device> 6 inch ethernet>Fiber adapter>1000' fiber> what goes here? >1000' fiber>adapter> 6" ethernet>device.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By simplemitch:
Originally Posted By kc8ykd:
how about an ethernet ->fiber adapter?

you'll probably want to armor the cable, but that should give you all the speed and distance you require.

http://www.amazon.com/MC200CM-Converter-1000Mbps-multi-mode-mountable/dp/B003AVRLZI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430484645&sr=8-1&keywords=ethernet+fiber

This adapter runs off 12v, either wall wart or it wouldn't be difficult to direct-wire to a battery. looks like it has no moving parts to fail as well.

If it's in a very rugged environment, i believe Netgear has a line of products made for .mil applications that have no moving parts and are supposed to be resistant to high temps (ie. desert use).

desmando, said it first.. 500m, looks durable, weak point will be the cable. a tough sheathing or metal conduit would be my choice. if it's conduit, you could delink the sections you need per each application, blow a stringer through with a shop vac or something, then pull the amount of fiber cable you need through it pretty easily, even with bends in the conduit.



This could be a viable option. but, a question:

It seems fiber (like every other cable) comes in 1000' foot spools. Could I get a 2000' run by doing this: device> 6 inch ethernet>Fiber adapter>1000' fiber> what goes here? >1000' fiber>adapter> 6" ethernet>device.

A pair of these:

http://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-1000Base-T-Media-Converter-TFC-1000MGA/dp/B0062K68D0

Even comes with the SFPs. Just make sure you get LC connectors on whatever fiber you get.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 9:39:42 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By simplemitch:



This could be a viable option. but, a question:

It seems fiber (like every other cable) comes in 1000' foot spools. Could I get a 2000' run by doing this: device> 6 inch ethernet>Fiber adapter>1000' fiber> what goes here? >1000' fiber>adapter> 6" ethernet>device.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By simplemitch:
Originally Posted By kc8ykd:
how about an ethernet ->fiber adapter?

you'll probably want to armor the cable, but that should give you all the speed and distance you require.

http://www.amazon.com/MC200CM-Converter-1000Mbps-multi-mode-mountable/dp/B003AVRLZI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430484645&sr=8-1&keywords=ethernet+fiber

This adapter runs off 12v, either wall wart or it wouldn't be difficult to direct-wire to a battery. looks like it has no moving parts to fail as well.

If it's in a very rugged environment, i believe Netgear has a line of products made for .mil applications that have no moving parts and are supposed to be resistant to high temps (ie. desert use).

desmando, said it first.. 500m, looks durable, weak point will be the cable. a tough sheathing or metal conduit would be my choice. if it's conduit, you could delink the sections you need per each application, blow a stringer through with a shop vac or something, then pull the amount of fiber cable you need through it pretty easily, even with bends in the conduit.



This could be a viable option. but, a question:

It seems fiber (like every other cable) comes in 1000' foot spools. Could I get a 2000' run by doing this: device> 6 inch ethernet>Fiber adapter>1000' fiber> what goes here? >1000' fiber>adapter> 6" ethernet>device.


these devices are recommended up to 1800', if you need dead-nuts reliability for the data, i'd run a fiber repeater
repeater

device -> ethernet -> fiber adapter -> 1k' fiber -> transciever -> 1k' fiber -> fiber adapter -> ethernet ->device


the other option is to move away from multimode fiber to single mode and use a similar but slightly different tranciever than the one i linked earlier. you'll sacrifice some speed but gain distance usually. (up to km distance depending on cable and speed)

you could also buy a spool of cable the distance you need, your local Graybar should be able to cut you a length of whatever you need pretty easily and put whatever ends you want on it.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 6:06:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/1/2015 6:10:02 PM EDT by eazeaz]
A Long Haul Cisco Fiber GBIC is rated for 6.2 miles on single mode cable 1gbps
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