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Posted: 8/1/2001 12:09:57 PM EST
[url]http://www.msnbc.com/news/607496.asp?pne=msn[/url] Story about microbes found in the upper atmosphere, about 26 miles up. Some scientists think they couldn't have gotten there from the ground and had to have been deposited there by microcomets or meteors, which could prove life exists outside our planet. The implications of this would be staggering from a scientific viewpoint...especially when considered in conjunction with the recent discovery (check the latest Scientific American magazine) that a certain kind of ice that exists in space could support microbial life. This could and probably would mean that life didn't start on Earth, but may have started either in the icey heart of a comet or on other planets, and was then transported here. Might not interest everyone, but I try to keep up with this sort of thing.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:15:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By RikWriter: [url]http://www.msnbc.com/news/607496.asp?pne=msn[/url] Story about microbes found in the upper atmosphere, about 26 miles up. Some scientists think they couldn't have gotten there from the ground and had to have been deposited there by microcomets or meteors, which could prove life exists outside our planet. The implications of this would be staggering from a scientific viewpoint...especially when considered in conjunction with the recent discovery (check the latest Scientific American magazine) that a certain kind of ice that exists in space could support microbial life. This could and probably would mean that life didn't start on Earth, but may have started either in the icey heart of a comet or on other planets, and was then transported here. Might not interest everyone, but I try to keep up with this sort of thing.
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Could be-on the other hand, 26 miles up is also high enough for them heavy CFC's to waft up into the upper atmosphere, and destroy the ozone layer, right? But when we find seashells up on top of some of the world's highest mountains, that proves nothing about a worldwide flood, as per Genesis... Rambling... Juggernaut
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:15:47 PM EST
I`m having traumatic flashbacks because someone said that pluto MAY NOT BE A PLANET.....after ALL these exams in ALL these years....SUCH SHOCKING EXTERPILATIONS!!!!!at least seven succesfully brought nelix back from the dead.....there IS HOPE........[smoke]
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:16:18 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:18:17 PM EST
Oh, that is news. I thought you were going to write on the article on Space.com about how Nasa now thinks they misread the results of the Viking crafts soil biology experiment. Their might very well be microbial life on Mars too. The Earth is only 1/3 the age of the visable universe. Entire solar systems have born and died since the begining- whatever it was. So even though life could have evloved here independantly, and we have experiments suggesting that it is possible- it is looking increasingly unlikely that it got the chance before being colonised by forms of life from space.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:20:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By Juggernaut: But when we find seashells up on top of some of the world's highest mountains, that proves nothing about a worldwide flood, as per Genesis...
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Talk about a non-sequitur! Ummm...you ever studied any geology? Or paleontology? If you did, you might know something about mountain building...and how some of our highest mountains were raised by plate tectonics and volcanic action, and how many of them used to be sea floor... Rambling back atcha...
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:23:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By Juggernaut:
Originally Posted By RikWriter: [url]http://www.msnbc.com/news/607496.asp?pne=msn[/url] Story about microbes found in the upper atmosphere, about 26 miles up. Some scientists think they couldn't have gotten there from the ground and had to have been deposited there by microcomets or meteors, which could prove life exists outside our planet. The implications of this would be staggering from a scientific viewpoint...especially when considered in conjunction with the recent discovery (check the latest Scientific American magazine) that a certain kind of ice that exists in space could support microbial life. This could and probably would mean that life didn't start on Earth, but may have started either in the icey heart of a comet or on other planets, and was then transported here. Might not interest everyone, but I try to keep up with this sort of thing.
View Quote
Could be-on the other hand, 26 miles up is also high enough for them heavy CFC's to waft up into the upper atmosphere, and destroy the ozone layer, right? But when we find seashells up on top of some of the world's highest mountains, that proves nothing about a worldwide flood, as per Genesis... Rambling... Juggernaut
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A microbe is quite a bit heavier than a molecule of CFC12, so it is unusual for them to be there. But then we did have a meteorite blow up over New England this month now didnt we? So it shouldnt be suprising to find wiered things in the upper atmosphere right now. As to the fossil seashells on top of a mountian- you have heard about tectonics and vulcanism, now havent you?
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:24:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By ArmdLbrl: The Earth is only 1/3 the age of the visable universe. Entire solar systems have born and died since the begining- whatever it was. So even though life could have evloved here independantly, and we have experiments suggesting that it is possible- it is looking increasingly unlikely that it got the chance before being colonised by forms of life from space.
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If these microbes do turn out to be extraterrestrial in origin, I wonder if it's possible that microbes could survive on comets or asteroids long enough to reach other star systems? I mean, the Oort Cloud supposedly stretches well into interstellar space... Could mean that if we ever do run into aliens, they won't be that different on a genetic level from terrestrial life.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:30:06 PM EST
Quote from the story -
Professor David Lloyd, a microbiologist at Cardiff University who examined the space bugs and co-authored the report, acknowledged that the microorganisms look like common terrestrial bacteria, but there is no explanation of how they could have risen so high. “There would have to be some unusual event which would take particles from the Earth to a height of 40 kilometers,” Lloyd said in a telephone interview. He speculated that the bacteria could have hitched a ride on a rocket or satellite into space — or they really could be from another planet. “We have no evidence for one or the other as yet,” said Lloyd. “The most likely possibility is that the bacteria have arrived from another planet. [b]I’d like to think that, at any rate[/b].”
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I'll just bet you do, Professor Lloyd, and if the specimens get jiggled a tad in the examination, we can all rest assured of your objectivity in this matter. Arrived from another planet, millions of miles from Earth, and yet definitely, well, not likely, from Earth a mere twenty-five miles away! You gotta have a lot of faith for some beliefs.[:D] Eric The(JustPassingThrough)Hun[>]:)]
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:38:40 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:42:41 PM EST
I'm thinking a few billion years of volcanoes and meteors smacking the ground should be enough to knock some germs 26 miles into the upper atmosphere. Bacteria, those things are "everywhere". As far as the distribution validating the microbes coming from outside the atmosphere inward. I seriously doubt they have enough data to validate that. I believe there's life out there. I just don't think this will prove it. Just a non-scientific, yet impartial opinion on my part.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 12:58:30 PM EST
I give think that the evidence gives a strong case for life starting else where from here, but I've read this study and they make a rather big conclusion from imperfect data. They unalateraly state that microbes from the surface couldn't reach that altitude, but they havn't done any investigating to determine that. I really do hope they end up being not of this world, but they need to study this further to reach a conclusion, ala ALH84001 [rail]
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 1:02:31 PM EST
You can't beleive the discoveries this quack could make if he just looked between my toes.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 1:02:48 PM EST
The fact that they have recently discovered microbes, does`nt mean they hav`nt been floating around for a very long time!........[thinking]
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 1:29:03 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 3:54:30 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 4:12:44 PM EST
Wasn't there a recent report about the Mir space station just before it crashed? There was something growing on the outside, microbes of some kind. Being that the Mir has been up in space forever, it wouldn't surprise me that if there was some kind of space microbe living on the space station that there would be something floating in space too. Our sun is a second generation star, that means there was a big red giant in its place a long time ago. There may have even been a few habitable planets orbiting around this start before it blew up. When it went nova and destroyed everything around it for trillions of miles, it could have scattered microbes everywhere in the form of comets and meteorites. These fall to Earth, Mars, Europa and Venus and repopulate them.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 4:31:05 PM EST
Originally Posted By Sodie: Our sun is a second generation star, that means there was a big red giant in its place a long time ago. There may have even been a few habitable planets orbiting around this start before it blew up. When it went nova and destroyed everything around it for trillions of miles, it could have scattered microbes everywhere in the form of comets and meteorites. These fall to Earth, Mars, Europa and Venus and repopulate them.
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No, there was not a red giant in the place of the sun a long time ago. That is not the meaning of "second generation." The sun and the planets formed at around the same time, give or take a few million years.
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 4:43:53 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 4:54:28 PM EST
---puts on tin foil hat---
Link Posted: 8/1/2001 5:04:18 PM EST
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