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Posted: 4/16/2006 1:32:46 PM EST
www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/14/opinion/polls/main1500906.shtml

I wonder how many were polled and where. It irks me when they neglect to say.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 2:20:34 PM EST
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 6:03:29 PM EST
The fact that they would prohibit the Bible from being discussed as literature violates the consitiution.
Don't forget that there is no seperation of Church and state. There is only the prohibition of establishing a state religion and restricting the free expression of religion.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 7:06:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By Interceptor_Knight:
The fact that they would prohibit the Bible from being discussed as literature violates the consitiution.
Don't forget that there is no seperation of Church and state. There is only the prohibition of establishing a state religion and restricting the free expression of religion.



The Bible isn't a very good piece of literature... in English atleast.

And SCOTUS has ruled there is a seperation of Church and state, so while it may not be spelled out in the Constitution, there is a precedent.
Link Posted: 4/16/2006 8:05:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By Interceptor_Knight:
The fact that they would prohibit the Bible from being discussed as literature violates the consitiution.
Don't forget that there is no seperation of Church and state. There is only the prohibition of establishing a state religion and restricting the free expression of religion.



No but past rulings have shown the purpose of the establishment clause to be the building of just such a wall between church and state.

The SCOTUS agrees with TJ on the purpose of the establishment clause.

and that is not what the article said. The majority of Americans have no problem with teaching it that way (not that that matters, we don't have mob rule in this country). More importantly, the SCOTUS has affirmed the legality of courses whose purpose is religious or historical overview using the Bible. Its only religous instruction in public schools that is not allowed.

Link Posted: 4/16/2006 9:22:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By PreMed_Gunner:

The Bible isn't a very good piece of literature... in English atleast.

I would suggest that you read 'In the Beginning: The Story of the King James Bible, and How It Changed a Nation, a Language and a Culture' by Alistair McGrath, published in 2002.

The subtitle says it all.

Even more than the works of Shakespeare, the King James Bible spread the English language over the entire globe and became the most beloved English book of all time.

Even athesists have called it a masterpiece of English language literature.

English must not be your first language, eh?

Eric The(EnglishSpeaking)Hun
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 4:14:45 AM EST

Originally Posted By Dino:
No but past rulings have shown the purpose of the establishment clause to be the building of just such a wall between church and state.

The SCOTUS agrees with TJ on the purpose of the establishment clause.



USPTJ's words are often molded to fit an agenda. They were used in a personal letter adressed to the Danbury Baptist Association. He was assuring them that he was a friend of religion and an advocate of religous liberty.
This letter did not come into the public light until SCOTUSOAABPNEBC Justice Hugo Black in a Supreme Court Case Emerson v. Board of education in 1947. Justice Black cited the "wall of separation," and characterized it as "high and impregnable." That decision concerned the use of state funds to transport children to religious schools
The SCOTUSOAABPNEBC may have ruled on individual cases, but the matter is far from settled.
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 8:31:25 AM EST
School? Home?

I suggest many school-systems and their students would be better served in learning the math and science skills they will need to support themselves, and with hope for a better future with a marketable college education.

Religion may be best treated in the home, or religious school, for those parents who are desiring of fostering a familly tradition.

Adding these studies to pre-college schools? Perhaps...for those children in "shop classes" and their otherwise unattentive or dissinterested parents. Oh, and those who would jeopardize the education system with an agenda.....





Link Posted: 4/17/2006 8:47:02 AM EST
While I see no problem offering a class to study the Bible, especially its influence on religion over the past several hundred years, I really am not concerned too much either way.

The best place to study the Bible is at home/personal study or in a Sunday school/seminary setting.
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