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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/6/2006 10:19:34 AM EDT
I've noticed there's two types of people around:

Those that have something that breaks or gets worn out, so they either get someone else to fix it, sell it, or throw / give it away.

Then there's people who think like I do when something breaks or gets worn out: "All I need to do is figure out how it works, why it isn't working, and then fix it." After that, all it takes is a little time and the right tools to do the job.

I've taken worn out chairs and made them like new with a little work and a few bucks worth of materials. Fixed / built golf clubs. Completed plumbing / electrical / remodeling projects. Built things from furniture to computers. Fixing guns. Picked up some equipment for a song, did a little work and had it worth hundreds of dollars. And many more things - all without duct dape, even.

So where do you fit in?
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:20:25 AM EDT
no ibtp!
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:21:11 AM EDT
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:23:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.



I already have, but it depends on what it is. Chilton manual, autozone, and a little time, probably.

Like I said, it depends on the tools needed. I don't have the setup to take everything apart, but I have done jobs with a $15 part that would have cost me $200 if I took it into the shop.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:24:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:
no ibtp!



You were lucky.......



Yeah I can fix anything given enough time, parts, tools and money.

Hell I've fixed perfectly good AR's after $3500.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:24:11 AM EDT
For the most part I will fix anything that I possibly can. If I look at it and have the time, I am all about it, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering on stuff as well.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:24:19 AM EDT
Yes.

But without a deadline.

Having the right tools is the key.

HS1
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:24:31 AM EDT
My dad has a killer set of tools...

Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:25:09 AM EDT
I don't have to. I married a guy who can.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:29:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SigSaurP228:
For the most part I will fix anything that I possibly can. If I look at it and have the time, I am all about it, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering on stuff as well.



I enjoy the tinkering and learning how things work. Plus there's the satisfaction of taking something you've never done before and going through the trouble of learning it.

All I need to do now is learn how to deliver a baby and plan an invasion.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:30:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:

Originally Posted By SigSaurP228:
For the most part I will fix anything that I possibly can. If I look at it and have the time, I am all about it, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering on stuff as well.



I enjoy the tinkering and learning how things work. Plus there's the satisfaction of taking something you've never done before and going through the trouble of learning it.

All I need to do now is learn how to deliver a baby and plan an invasion.



They're both kinda related....spread your seed and your invasion will already be in the "planning stages" no?

Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:30:35 AM EDT
Absolutely. Espceially if I also have the technical documentation ( schematics).

Now having said that, if it has to do with software, forgeddaboutit.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:31:52 AM EDT
Somewhat... I can fix many things but fabricating stuff out of steel isn't in my curriculum vitae.

I've fixed cars and figured out how to fix bikes and stuff. I wouldn't consider myself super-handy though.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:32:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Originally Posted By bastiat:

Originally Posted By SigSaurP228:
For the most part I will fix anything that I possibly can. If I look at it and have the time, I am all about it, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering on stuff as well.



I enjoy the tinkering and learning how things work. Plus there's the satisfaction of taking something you've never done before and going through the trouble of learning it.

All I need to do now is learn how to deliver a baby and plan an invasion.



They're both kinda related....spread your seed and your invasion will already be in the "planning stages" no?




I said 'deliver' not 'make'
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:34:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:

Originally Posted By PlaymoreMinds:

Originally Posted By bastiat:

Originally Posted By SigSaurP228:
For the most part I will fix anything that I possibly can. If I look at it and have the time, I am all about it, plus I kind of enjoy tinkering on stuff as well.



I enjoy the tinkering and learning how things work. Plus there's the satisfaction of taking something you've never done before and going through the trouble of learning it.

All I need to do now is learn how to deliver a baby and plan an invasion.



They're both kinda related....spread your seed and your invasion will already be in the "planning stages" no?




I said 'deliver' not 'make'



Speaking as a woman, all I can say is the "making" is WAAAAAAAAAAY more fun than the "delivering!"
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:35:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:37:15 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:38:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ponyboy:
I work on multimillion dollar pieces of equipment most of the time with no schematics or stuff that is in japanese. I do electronics, robotics, pneumatics, lasers, etc. You name it and I can work on it. I know how to weld, machine and build stuff with wood.

So yeah, I think I can pretty much fix anything down to component level.



Ha ha, I thought we were the only ones with clean-room wood. j/k.....
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:42:16 AM EDT
If it ain't broke, I cant' fix it!

After restoring cars and building a couple of drag race cars, not to mention owning a home or two over the years, yes I can fix most anything given time and tools.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:43:41 AM EDT
nope

i can fix computers thats about it.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:48:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.



Diagnosed and fixed a torn intake manifold gasket three weeks ago without a code reader in under four hours.

I put foundation drains in outside my house, am remodeling (completely) a bathroom, redoing plumbing, wiring, etc.

I am a definite fix it myself person. I may pay someone to do something I can do myself to save time and hassle, but I darn well want to know how it works.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:53:51 AM EDT
I can fix anything with the proper tool. Due to my mechanical inclinations, that tool is a MasterCard.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 10:54:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.



You can do a suprising ammount on a 90's era or later car. All that computerization actually made diagnosis and repair EASIER for most things. With the right kind of scanner, you can test individual sensors and modules while they are still attatched to the car, and can pinpoint most problems.

A subscription to TSBs about your vehicle will also help you spot problems and figure out fixes.

I do most of the work on my vehicles myself, except for transmission work. That I will leave to professionals because I am scared of them.

Just about any repair job that doesn't require removing the motor from the vehicle is something I will tackle if I have the time to do so.

Working on late model cars requires a few major things:

1. A good code scanner that will let you read individual sensors. With the advent of OBD 2 regulations, these are expensive but well worth it if you want to work on your vehicle yourself. Dealerships use the same types of scanners that you can find on the market. Why pay for theirs when you can own yours?

2. A dealer service manual. You can order these from dealers and have the illustrations and instructions that the dealer has. Invaluable as they are specific and easy to follow, better than the Haynes or Chilton manuals any day. These too are expensive, but worth it.

3. TSB subscription. The Technical Service Bulletins are what dealers use to fix problems that pop up with vehicles. The manufacturers put the bulletins out when they recognize a problem with their vehicles. These usually contain the solutions to the problems that nag specific vehicles, engine types, etc. For instance, my 1997 Dodge Intrepid had a nasty rough idle problem that kept getting worse, but I couldn't diagnose the problem. I looked at a TSB about the issue and discovered that the 3.5L engine had a problem with intake manifold gaskets developing a leak around 60-70,000 miles. I took it to the dealer, told them to replace the intake manifold gasket, and she was as good as new.

4. Good jack and jackstands/ramps, etc. A good secure way of getting the car into the air is a great aid in fixing most problems.

5. Reliable tools. Crafstman stuff is more than adequate for most jobs, though individual vehicles require some specialty tools on occasion. Good wrenches, screwdrivers, sockets, and socket drives are a must. A nice torque wrench is also a great tool to have. If you are going to be doing high torque things like removing heads and the like, make sure you have breaker bars or Snap On socket drives. Craftsman socket drives just aren't tough enough for that sort of work.

With those 5 elements, you can tackle most problems yourself with little trouble.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:00:13 AM EDT
My beer gut needs some fixin. Given enough time, I will fix it.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:01:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:
I've noticed there's two types of people around:

Those that have something that breaks or gets worn out, so they either get someone else to fix it, sell it, or throw / give it away.

Then there's people who think like I do when something breaks or gets worn out: "All I need to do is figure out how it works, why it isn't working, and then fix it." After that, all it takes is a little time and the right tools to do the job.

I've taken worn out chairs and made them like new with a little work and a few bucks worth of materials. Fixed / built golf clubs. Completed plumbing / electrical / remodeling projects. Built things from furniture to computers. Fixing guns. Picked up some equipment for a song, did a little work and had it worth hundreds of dollars. And many more things - all without duct dape, even.

So where do you fit in?



Most problems can be fixed by a person with even limited skill who is practically minded and who understands a few basics about repair work. Installing an overhead light, replacing an electrical outlet that is broken, replacing a lamp switch that is broken, doing a tuneup, changing the oil in a car, rebuilding a lawnmower carb, fixing a busted drive belt on a washing machine, doing a brake job on your car, putting up drywall, replacing a leaky pipe, installing a hot water heater, all are things that the average person can do without too much hassle if they spend a little time learning and make sure they do the job by the book.

When it comes to major fabrication, welding, complex machining, I am out of my league. I am sure I could learn, but I don't have the time or tools it takes to do such work.

There are things, however,
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:08:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.


if its a polpular make any good auto parts dealer can help you out a lot.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:09:58 AM EDT
To a certain point, yes.
Could I rebuild a tranny with the tools and an EMPTY garage? Yup.
Could I rebuild/replace a toilet, dishwashwer, garbage disposal? Yup.
Could I rebuild an a/c coolant pump? maybe, but something I've never done.
Could I rebuild a computer? maybe, but its something I've never done.

The better question is.... with all the decaying relationship examples of Arfcom members, and "IF" I were to suffer a similar problem, could I rebuild the relationship. Hmm..... well, the Arfcommer in me says "why bother, move on, get some hookers and blow" - yet the nice guy in me says.... "who cares, there's more women out there!".
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:12:33 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:
I've noticed there's two types of people around:

Then there's people who think like I do when something breaks or gets worn out: "All I need to do is figure out how it works, why it isn't working, and then fix it." After that, all it takes is a little time and the right tools to do the job.

So where do you fit in?



My daughters barbie doll bicycle was busted up pretty good but I was able to rebuild it with the startegic use of some small drill bits now its better than new. My old Quad had more home grown R and D on it then OEM parts. Ive dug a half dozen bicycles out of junk piles in the last coupla years and put them back in service. I found a year ole Craftman 6.5hp SP lawn mower in the trash and it is functioning fine now. For many years I've purchased old beaqt up gun and refurbished them and put them back in circulation...
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:13:05 AM EDT
You need "I can rebuild an engine with a toothpick, used chewing gum, and a pair of rusty pliers" to your poll....because some people can.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 11:23:41 AM EDT
Pretty much everything, but I only take it down to the smoke filled black box. For instance on my 97 sentra, I have replaced the cv axles. Didn't rebuild them because it would cost more and be more painful to do. But I wouldn't have paid to replace them.
My pain factor is about 20 bucks. If it is going to cost more that 20 bucks for me to pay someone to do the work, I will try to do it myself, if I can buy or rent the tools for less.

I find most newer cars are just as easy to work on, if you can identify the parts. All the parts are pretty much the same, they just look different.

I can build and repair my own computers, but HD, mother boards, and what not are replace parts not fix.

I don't know how far down I could go into parts rebuilding, but I do know that in most cases when it gets to that point, it is cheaper to buy a new one then invest in the tools to rebuild something like that again. Unless you do a lot of it, or plan on doing it more than once.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:39:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.



It's as easy as fixing my 1964 Barracuda.

Yeah, there's plenty of electrical stuff to go wrong, but when I plug my laptop into my vehicle OBD-2 port, the car can tell me what it thinks is wrong. The 'Cuda could never do that.

It still just takes tools and brains. The proportions have just changed.

Jim
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:40:55 PM EDT
No, that's what the yellow pages are for.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:51:13 PM EDT
Hell yes! I'm always fixing stuff. Most of my vehicles dont run when I get them. I dont believe in paying someone else to do something that I can do.

Every new project is a good learning experience. I'ver worked on all kinds of things from home electronics, small engine, automotive, I even rebuilt an autoclave for the local vet.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:52:10 PM EDT
A universal truth my friends and I discovered a long time ago.

You either have the time, the money, or the equipment (tools or place) but rarely all three.

I do the best that I can with what I have depending on which one I'm shortest on.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:52:33 PM EDT
It's fun to fix things. (Some) Broken things are like puzzles, only they aren't boring.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 12:54:06 PM EDT
Can I fix almost anything given the right tools and enough time? Oh, hell yes. In fact, it's a matter of great pride. How's this: My brother-in-law and I broke a drag link on my sway bar (long story). While we could've waited for a dealer to order the part (3 days minimum), we decided to take care of business and fix it ourselves in an afternoon.

Welding it back together (it was a clean break):



Clean up the welds:



Not too shabby...:



Powder coat the part:



Place in oven:



I'm a tool hound. Alot of jobs aren't difficult if you have the right tools. An investment in tools and time will pay off big time. Fixing your own problems is VERY rewarding, at least to me. It's fun!



Link Posted: 2/6/2006 1:01:28 PM EDT
With enough time and tools, I think I could fix just about anything. However that isn't my problem. My problem is that I learned about fixing stuff from my dad, who is an electrical engineer. The engineers' motto is "If it ain't broke, fix it till it is." I can't seem to leave well enough alone and usually cause more problems than I fix.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 1:11:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:
Can you fix your 1990's era or later car?? Probably not.



Yes, been doing it for a few years. OBDII scan tools ARE available. I use a specific tool for my VW called Vag Com, made by Ross Tech. Hooks up to my PC.

I have the factory service manual for all my vehicles. They are no harder to service than a car from the 70's if you have the factory manual and are reasonably smart.



Link Posted: 2/6/2006 1:11:29 PM EDT
Yek's rules of mechaniking:

1) The asshole who invented it obviously wasn't and smarter than you or else it would not have broke.

2) After learning "right tight- left loose" everything else is cake.

3) Gas goes boom.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 2:01:47 PM EDT
Yes, I can and do. But, that's also what I get paid to do at my job, so when I get home I need alot of motivation to continue on a home project.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 2:56:00 PM EDT
Maybe not ANYTHING. But if properly motivated and no pressing engagements I've fixed some things and been fairly pleased that they worked.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:23:58 PM EDT
It has always been my job to fix things that break. I started working on an old race car my dad used to run. I learned to weld on it when I was 9, and been fixin stuff ever since. I have been in industrial maintenance for over 20 years now, so yes, I can fix about anything you throw at me!
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:28:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/6/2006 3:34:27 PM EDT by fla556guy]
Now...there are things that aren't worth fixing because the cost of fixing them along with the time that it would take me is more than the cost to replace it. Also, new model cars are made so that they are damn near imposible to fix, and I believe it's done on purpose so that you have to take the car to the dealership to have a problem fixed. Now, if you are smart and don't break any little plastic $400 parts, then you made out good, but if you break one of them, the repair job will end up costing you more than it would to take it to the dealer. For example:

My 2005 F150's fuel line from the fuel filter is connected somewhere by a little plastic clip (I read about this on a ford forum). The little plastic clip is damn near impossible not to break when you try to replace the fuel filter. When you do break it, you can't just buy that part from ford, you have to buy a fuel filter kit. This kit is something like $400. They know you don't need the other parts, but they do know that the little plastic clip that they designed to be easily broken, will be needed and if they don't sell it by itself, one must buy the "kit."
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:47:33 PM EDT
Not one to brag but if man made it i can fix it.Got way to many tools and i cannot get out of it.
Link Posted: 2/6/2006 3:48:08 PM EDT
The question: "Do you feel you can fix almost anything given enough time and the right tools?"

I'm pretty good with hardware. But I cannot fix cancer, abusive parents, cruel pet owners, nazis, Islam, that dumbass that runs N. Korea...or Teddy Kennedy. There are many more things I cannot fix than those that I can.
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