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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 7/31/2005 9:47:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 4:46:12 AM EDT by TacticalStrat]
Any warning...tips? Is it OK to get it on the metal? What about putting it on wood that has a light , nearly worn away varnish on it?


Note: The wood is in great condition. I only want to apply something to the wood to preserve it.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 9:49:27 AM EDT
Oil on rag.

Rub rag on wood.

Let sit.

Rub off excess with clean rag.

SGat1r5
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 9:49:37 AM EDT
dont tell me you're refinishing a stock with the weapon still in it.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 9:50:15 AM EDT
Take the wood off first.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 9:53:28 AM EDT
Sarge summed it up. After you apply the blo, let it sit for about a day to be absorbed, then wipe off any excess. I've heard some suggest that if you mix the BLO with turpentine, the wood will absorb the BLO better, but I haven't tried that yet.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 9:59:39 AM EDT
OT: I would be EXTREMELY CAREFUL with that rag full of boiled linseed oil. Disposed of it properly, the possiblity of spontaneous combustion is great.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:00:23 AM EDT
I would recommend Tung Oil
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:03:40 AM EDT
Remove the wood.

Use a gunstock pore filler on bare wood.

Place a little bit of the oil in the palm of your hand and massage it into the stock for 15min. Make sure you build up heat by friction while doing this. The heat helps oxidation and penetration. Wipe off excess buildup with a LINT FREE cloth. Wait about a week then repeat.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:05:13 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
dont tell me you're refinishing a stock with the weapon still in it.




I have 15 or so rifles with wood stocks that I want to put the linseed oil on to preserve the wood. Can't I just wipe it on the wood while the rifle is assembled? I don't want to take them all apart to wipe the oil on the wood unless it's necessary. Will it hurt the finish (painted, blued or parkerized) on the metal if I get the linseed oil on the metal?

Maybe I'm misinformed, but I though boiled Linseed oil is used on natural wood as a preservative.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:06:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat:

Originally Posted By TheRedHorseman:
dont tell me you're refinishing a stock with the weapon still in it.




I have 15 or so rifles with wood stocks that I want to put the linseed oil on to preserve the wood. Can't I just wipe it on the wood while the rifle is assembled? I don't want to take them all apart to wipe the oil on the wood unless it's necessary. Will it hurt the finish (painted, blued or parkerized) on the metal if I get the linseed oil on the metal?

Maybe I'm misinformed, but I though boiled Linseed oil is used on natural wood as a preservative.



I use tung oil for that.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:06:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Painter:
I would recommend Tung Oil



Yeah, I would also.

SGatr15
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:09:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 10:11:02 AM EDT by Painter]

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat:
Maybe I'm misinformed, but I though boiled Linseed oil is used on natural wood as a preservative.



Tung Oil is better for what you are doing.
ETA: you probably will notice a shiny spot on any metal you get it on. I guess, just be careful.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:09:47 AM EDT
I would use something like renaissance wax or butcher block for somthing like that.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:11:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Painter:

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat:
Maybe I'm misinformed, but I though boiled Linseed oil is used on natural wood as a preservative.



Tung Oil is better for what you are doing.




OK Thanks! Does linseed oil leave a finish on the wood when it dries, or is it just oil that soaks into the wood?
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:12:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 10:18:27 AM EDT by Painter]
I used tung oil on this AK furniture


ETA: I applied about 3 or 4 coats to these pieces. I thinned the first coat about 15% with mineral spirits, and wiped off the excess after 20 - 30 minutes. Let it dry for a few days, until it wasnt tacky. I wasn't in a hurry, so it might have been ready sooner than that. Lightly sand and a second coat that wasnt thinned, let it dry and then a third coat. I wiped off the excess, and when it stops absorbing, then I stopped applying it. I was trying to avoid a surface coating, ----I just applied as much as the wood would accept. Not like a urethane where it is layers sitting on top of the wood.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:20:25 AM EDT
Also-

These were walnut stocks that I stained first. And the first and second coat of Tung oil had a small amount of the stain in it, so it got a deeper looking finished appearance.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:20:52 AM EDT

Originally Posted By warlord:
OT: I would be EXTREMELY CAREFUL with that rag full of boiled linseed oil. Disposed of it properly, the possiblity of spontaneous combustion is great.




Define "properly"

What should I do, rinse the rag with a water hose before throwing it in the trash can???
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:23:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 10:24:56 AM EDT by Painter]
Dont wad it up and throw it away with a bunch of others. Let it lay out flat, and dry, maybe outside. I usually let my rags dry and then throw them away. If they are around for a while, put them in can with water in it. The rag with oil won't soak up water.

I stain a lot of furniture, and let my rags lay on the floor, in an area where they can dry for a few days, and then when they are stiff, I toss them in a dumpster that gets collected.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:28:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Painter:
Dont wad it up and throw it away with a bunch of others. Let it lay out flat, and dry, maybe outside. I usually let my rags dry and then throw them away. If they are around for a while, put them in can with water in it. The rag with oil won't soak up water.

I stain a lot of furniture, and let my rags lay on the floor, in an area where they can dry for a few days, and then when they are stiff, I toss them in a dumpster that gets collected.




Thanks man!!

BTW, Your AKM looks great!!
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 10:32:22 AM EDT
You're welcome, and thanks!
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 1:39:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TacticalStrat:
...Does linseed oil leave a finish on the wood when it dries, or is it just oil that soaks into the wood?


Boiled linseed oil is a finish (and is often used in highly figured wood stocks).

Put several layers down and it’ll build up a gloss similar to varnish.

I’ve never done it, but I suspect putting it on a stock that’s already finished with something other than linseed oil will likely result in a hard-to-remove mess.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 1:46:29 PM EDT
Save a tree, buy an AR with a high-tech plastic stock. :-)
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 3:31:55 PM EDT
Boiled linseed oil is a pretty mediocre finish.


You'd be better off using Tung Oil which is the most water resistant of all oil finishes, and it dries to a better sheen.

You need to get all the old finish off first. Sand with a sanding sponge (work up from 120 to 220 to 320 grit), vacuum off the dust, then buff the wood with some 0000 steel wool. Wipe off all the dust, vacuum the stock, and if you can blow some compressed air on it to get everything out of the open pores in the grain.

Apply several coats of oil with a disposable brush, wiping off the excess with a clean rag. Let the oil dry a day before you reapply, then with a light buffing of 0000 steel wool between coats, repeat the process. About five coats will produce a very nice finish that will repel water and add depth to the grain and figure in the wood.


There is an abbreviated way to do this I am sure, but this comes from my furniture building and finishing experience.
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 3:34:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/31/2005 4:27:22 PM EDT by jrzy]

Originally Posted By Painter:
I would recommend Tung Oil



www.stocksrestored.com/Lee_Enfield_British_303.html
Link Posted: 7/31/2005 4:04:05 PM EDT
I've used both B.L.O. and Tung Oil on Garands ...I would have to say my preference is the boiled linseed oil.

For me, BLO tends to give the wood a more realistic finish, with a real wood look and good protection.
Tung Oil, even when using the low gloss formula, ends up being too shiney and looking like a cheap polyurethane re-do.
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