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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 3/12/2006 7:32:51 PM EDT
Anyone had this before? How'd you treat it and what worked best? How long did it take to go away? I'm slated to go to Marine OCS on May 28th and am trying to clear it up before I ship. Thanks for any advice.
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 7:37:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2006 7:39:32 PM EDT by Dave_A]

Originally Posted By walrus:
Anyone had this before? How'd you treat it and what worked best? How long did it take to go away? I'm slated to go to Marine OCS on May 28th and am trying to clear it up before I ship. Thanks for any advice.



1) I Have it

2) You can relieve it by stretching and not running. Not 'running less' - NOT running... From when you stop agrivating it, it can take over 6mos to go away.... Once 'relieved', you can keep it down with orthodic insoles (get them from the service once you're in and it comes back - it WILL come back), and continued stretching.

3) There is a surgery, but it is not 100% effective. It can cure the problem, or it can fuck up your running ability beyond all hope...

4) You can 'manage' it by not running for a while, then running untill it comes back (I did this trying to get thru Army OCS last year) but the end result is... WORSE PF... I'm now on perminant restriction WRT running...

5) If you try to 'tough it out', you will hurt yourself worse. In my case, in addition to the pain, I started to tighten up to the point where I could barely keep up with a slow jog....
Link Posted: 3/12/2006 7:40:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dave_A:

Originally Posted By walrus:
Anyone had this before? How'd you treat it and what worked best? How long did it take to go away? I'm slated to go to Marine OCS on May 28th and am trying to clear it up before I ship. Thanks for any advice.



1) Have it

2) You can relieve it by stretching and not running. Not 'running less' - NOT running... From when you stop agrivating it, it can take over 6mos to go away.... Once 'relieved', you can keep it down with orthodic insoles (get them from the service once you're in and it comes back - it WILL come back), and continued stretching.

3) There is a surgery, but it is not 100% effective. It can cure the problem, or it can fuck up your running ability beyond all hope...

4) You can 'manage' it by not running for a while, then running untill it comes back (I did this trying to get thru Army OCS last year) but the end result is... WORSE PF... I'm now on perminant restriction WRT running...



I have orthodics now, they seem to work ok. I'm just going to be hitting the exercise bike til about mid-April. What stretches do you do?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 4:48:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/13/2006 4:49:09 AM EDT by illigb]
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 12:48:18 PM EDT
Had my first bout with PF in '87, IIRC. Had my podiatrist adjust my orthotics--no improvement. Tried stretching--no improvement. Rested a couple weeks--no improvement.

Finally, in desperation, had my podiatrist shoot me with cortisone, aware of its potential damage.

Relief.

Over the years, it recurred two or three times so I kept getting the shots. For me, a shot into the side of the heel worked best.

Also, tried a Step Stretch device (or something like that name), and it seemed to help, as did being more diligent about stretching my hamstrings (which are my current source of frustration). Good luck.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 2:11:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Had my first bout with PF in '87, IIRC. Had my podiatrist adjust my orthotics--no improvement. Tried stretching--no improvement. Rested a couple weeks--no improvement.

Finally, in desperation, had my podiatrist shoot me with cortisone, aware of its potential damage.

Relief.

Over the years, it recurred two or three times so I kept getting the shots. For me, a shot into the side of the heel worked best.

Also, tried a Step Stretch device (or something like that name), and it seemed to help, as did being more diligent about stretching my hamstrings (which are my current source of frustration). Good luck.



What potential damage do you speak of?
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 8:38:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By walrus:
What potential damage do you speak of?



Actually, I should've written "potential for damage". From what I've been told, too many cortisone injections may predispose the area to ligament damage. In the case of plantar faciitis, that menas excessive use of cortisone injections could weaken the plantar fascia enough that it could rupture. That's probably not something you want to have occur, as it could lead to a collapsed arch, IIRC. That happened to a woman in my running club after she'd qualified for the Olympic Trials marathon. But (also IIRC) I believe there is an operation in which a surgeon actually severs the plantar fascia as a proactive measure, before the chance of it rupturing. So just make sure you don't have a podiatrist who's super-willing to provide you with multiple injections in a short time frame (less than a year).
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 9:28:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kato4moto:

Originally Posted By walrus:
What potential damage do you speak of?



Actually, I should've written "potential for damage". From what I've been told, too many cortisone injections may predispose the area to ligament damage. In the case of plantar faciitis, that menas excessive use of cortisone injections could weaken the plantar fascia enough that it could rupture. That's probably not something you want to have occur, as it could lead to a collapsed arch, IIRC. That happened to a woman in my running club after she'd qualified for the Olympic Trials marathon. But (also IIRC) I believe there is an operation in which a surgeon actually severs the plantar fascia as a proactive measure, before the chance of it rupturing. So just make sure you don't have a podiatrist who's super-willing to provide you with multiple injections in a short time frame (less than a year).



Note to self: don't get many cortisone injections.

I guess I was looking for good news in this thread or looking for stories about a fast healing Wanted to do OCS since elementary school, I hope a medical problem doesn't shitcan my dreams.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 11:09:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By kato4moto:
Had my first bout with PF in '87, IIRC. Had my podiatrist adjust my orthotics--no improvement. Tried stretching--no improvement. Rested a couple weeks--no improvement.

Finally, in desperation, had my podiatrist shoot me with cortisone, aware of its potential damage.

Relief.

Over the years, it recurred two or three times so I kept getting the shots. For me, a shot into the side of the heel worked best.

Also, tried a Step Stretch device (or something like that name), and it seemed to help, as did being more diligent about stretching my hamstrings (which are my current source of frustration). Good luck.



+1 on cortisone injectons. One injection worked wonders for me.
Link Posted: 3/13/2006 11:35:10 PM EDT
An excellent treatment for plantar fasciatis is as follows. Take a common dishtowel or wash rag and lay it flat on the floor. Place your toes over one edge. Proceed to use your toes in a kneading motion to pull the towel under your feet. It wont actually go under your feet very well but it's the action of using your toes to try that will help. This coupled with rest (as in not running) should help. I've never been a big runner but know several and have done a little. This is from a book on running and was also suggested to me by a runner here at work. She swears by this remedy and it works pretty quickly.I would try it before any serious medical intervention.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 2:06:18 PM EDT
Dealt with this for a long 6-8 months. Here is what worked for me. First go see a doctor, preferably an orthopedic surgeon, for an evaluation. I put it off for a long time, and due to the change in my walking habits, I also started having problems in my achilles tendons. If you get that, OCS will be out for you this summer. (Been there '89 and '90, so I know).

First, he had me show him the boots I was using. Wore these in A-stan for 7 months and may have been a contributor to the problem. I sh*tcanned them. If you bought some sort of new shoe in the last six months or so, you may consider this. Then I went to a place called the walking store. They sell a semi custom orthotic. It helped and it is not as expensive as going and having these made. Also went and got one of those night splints. I could not sleep with it on, but I would wear it for about 40 min per foot (20 min at a time) while I was sitting around. You could do this even while sitting in class. Get yourself some good gel ice packs and use them after this. Finally stretch at least twice a day (especially after you wake up). After about 4-6 weeks you will see relief.

Last I went to a physical therapist. (mine was so bad I went from a sub 20 3 mile run to barely able to walk). Their treatments will vary. One thing that really helped was he recommended my doctor prescribe a pain reliever/anti inflammatory called ketoprophen. This drug is not available for ingestion, but I went to a compound pharmacy (they make drugs) and they made a 10% solution cream. It is applied directly to the sore spot and it really worked for me.

You must start taking care of this now. If it is not bad, you may be able to gut it out at OCS. But with all the boots runs, dont count on it. If is hampering your running, it is only going to get worse. Seek some professional consultation and take care of it now. I am running again, but not quite up to speed. However, you are a young buck and should heal faster. Forget the steroids. I got the prednisone. Worked great for about two weeks and then the pain came back with a vengeance.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 9:13:10 PM EDT
Does running in boots make the problem worse? The foot doctor said that the stiffer sole you run on, the better that is for PF. Something about it not giving as much so it's less stress. I've also heard don't run on the balls of your feet, that stretches it as well. Is majority of the running at OCS in boots, Stray? So far, I'm taking 6 advil a day, wear my orthodics at all times, stretch my calves, run my foot over a tennis ball, and ice my feet. Trying all I can do to make it go away before May 28th comes. Bad thing is, I can't go to OCS without practicing running, and I have to pass a preship PFT on April 28th. Need at least 24 minutes for the 3 mile, which I could do easy with good feet.
Link Posted: 3/14/2006 10:04:14 PM EDT
Try sitting down, Place a Tennis ball under you foot and roll it around.
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 9:18:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By walrus:
Does running in boots make the problem worse? The foot doctor said that the stiffer sole you run on, the better that is for PF. Something about it not giving as much so it's less stress. I've also heard don't run on the balls of your feet, that stretches it as well. Is majority of the running at OCS in boots, Stray? So far, I'm taking 6 advil a day, wear my orthodics at all times, stretch my calves, run my foot over a tennis ball, and ice my feet. Trying all I can do to make it go away before May 28th comes. Bad thing is, I can't go to OCS without practicing running, and I have to pass a preship PFT on April 28th. Need at least 24 minutes for the 3 mile, which I could do easy with good feet.



I'd have to disagree with the stiffer sole being better for you part. Boots (especially those with anti-penetration plates in the soles) are really too stiff to do much running in. Of course, different foot types need different degrees of stiffness in a running shoe.

I land on my forefoot and have tight calves to I can vouch that those two things do predispose you to PF.

I think you're doing the right thing to attack the problem. The only thing I'd add is more stretching of the other major lower extremity muscle groups, especially the hamstrings. You may have to avoid running and try some other aerobic activity. Water running can be an excellent cross-training substitute.

Best of luck to you!
Link Posted: 3/15/2006 12:38:56 PM EDT
Thanks for the replies and help guys, I appreciate it.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:55:07 PM EDT
OCS is boots and Utes all day. Realize it was a long time ago when I went, but the PFT is the least of your worries. You will run 6 days and the light days will be with running shoes. Now I did hear a few years ago alot of the boots running was curtailed and more running shoes introduced, but you will be wearing boots for 16 hours a day as well. When you have a hike, you will be in boots. Everywhere you go will be black cadillac. You have the endurance course, the BFT, the reaction course, SULE 1 and 2.

This is not said for you to lose hope. The sports medicine program at OCS has vastly improved, and the reality is the only "required pass/fail event" is the PFT. However, if you get skylined, you will recieve extra attention. What I do recommend and it still stands, is see a professional. With a combination of therapy, medications, and alternate exercise, you can heal prior to April 28th and still run an acceptable PFT. It may not be great, but it is just a preship. Do not lose sight of what it is you want to do. Being a Marine Officer is a great deal. Get on the exercise bike, crank down the tension and ride for twice as long as you normally would. Get on the stairmaster, get in the pool, get on the elliptical. While these are no substitute, they will help with your endurance. Sometimes the frontal attack is not the way to go. PM me if I can help out more.

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:37:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Stray:
OCS is boots and Utes all day. Realize it was a long time ago when I went, but the PFT is the least of your worries. You will run 6 days and the light days will be with running shoes. Now I did hear a few years ago alot of the boots running was curtailed and more running shoes introduced, but you will be wearing boots for 16 hours a day as well. When you have a hike, you will be in boots. Everywhere you go will be black cadillac. You have the endurance course, the BFT, the reaction course, SULE 1 and 2.

This is not said for you to lose hope. The sports medicine program at OCS has vastly improved, and the reality is the only "required pass/fail event" is the PFT. However, if you get skylined, you will recieve extra attention. What I do recommend and it still stands, is see a professional. With a combination of therapy, medications, and alternate exercise, you can heal prior to April 28th and still run an acceptable PFT. It may not be great, but it is just a preship. Do not lose sight of what it is you want to do. Being a Marine Officer is a great deal. Get on the exercise bike, crank down the tension and ride for twice as long as you normally would. Get on the stairmaster, get in the pool, get on the elliptical. While these are no substitute, they will help with your endurance. Sometimes the frontal attack is not the way to go. PM me if I can help out more.




They've changed the boots now, you wear the hot weather boots as opposed to the old black ones. Regardless, still tons of boot wearing as you mentioned. I've got a pair to break in and get used to. Wearing the boots doesn't hurt, it's just running that does.

I have seen a professional, have been given orthotics, and have gotten a cortisone shot. I still hit the gym 3 times a week and do judo the 2 other days. I cycle 40 minutes at a time 4 times a week. I am doing all I can to get in shape. If i get NPQ'ed (Not Physically Qualified), I am going to be pretty down. If that is the case, I'll start working out the day I get back from OCS for next summer. This is something I will not give up on. I just REALLY hope I pass the first weeks this summer, as I lose sleep over it every night. I suppose the only help you guys can give me now is prayers, as I need all the help I can get.
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