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Posted: 9/3/2015 11:57:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:03:59 AM EDT
Interesting. That article really needs to be rewritten though.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:04:00 AM EDT
Was done in an F-86 during Korea as well:  http://acepilots.com/korea_risner.html
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:04:03 AM EDT
Great story,thanks for sharing
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:16:18 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By j_hooker:


Great story,thanks for sharing
View Quote




 
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:20:19 AM EDT
How much altitude did his massive balls cost him?
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:29:33 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
How much altitude did his massive balls cost him?
View Quote


1500 feet / minute.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:32:36 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Jerryjeff:

 
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Originally Posted By Jerryjeff:
Originally Posted By j_hooker:
Great story,thanks for sharing

 

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:34:03 AM EDT

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:37:07 AM EDT

Outstanding!

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:37:11 AM EDT
I never heard that story before.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:40:24 AM EDT



20
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:42:14 AM EDT
Damn that is awesome.  Thanks for sharing!  
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:48:48 AM EDT
when the going got tough they had balls.    
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 12:52:51 AM EDT
I remember reading about that when I was a kid.  Amazing courage by the pilot, and a testament to the strength of that jet.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 1:00:27 AM EDT
Totally needs made into a motivational poster.  Sometimes you need just pointed in the right direction, sometimes you need shoved 88 miles by a fighter jet.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 3:06:12 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Tim_AZ:
Was done in an F-86 during Korea as well:  http://acepilots.com/korea_risner.html
View Quote


I had heard that one before...too bad the "puhsee" didn't make it.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 5:34:19 AM EDT
Man he had balls of steel.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 5:50:03 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By BUCC_Guy:
How much altitude did his massive balls cost him?
View Quote


I bet they clank and spark when he walks.  Badass pilot.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 5:51:39 AM EDT
Amazing display of courage and loyalty to a wingman.



Sadly though, not suprised at the inital reaction of some of the superiors
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 5:51:45 AM EDT
Amazing story.  Horrific writing.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 5:55:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2015 5:59:30 AM EDT by NotoriousBRT]
There is an episode of "Dogfights" that includes the Korea incident. Poor guy got his ass saved and then ejected over water, got tangled in his chute and drowned.



Gutsy bastards, they were.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:06:20 AM EDT
Guy led an interesting life, not just Vietnam. Pretty interesting read.





http://airportjournals.com/bob-pardo-stuck-between-a-medal-and-a-court-martial-part-2/
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:14:38 AM EDT
Typical, the fucking bean counters tried to hang him.

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:21:33 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Tim_AZ:
Was done in an F-86 during Korea as well:  http://acepilots.com/korea_risner.html
View Quote


Read about this one a few years ago.  Balls.  Big ones.  First chasing the Mig across the border, flying through the hanger to stay on the Mig's tail to shoot it down and then pushing his wingman that far.  Amazing people.  American military personnel.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:51:19 AM EDT
Always amazed at this display of bravery.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:53:22 AM EDT
JAG did an episode with that happening & listed WHY they did it during the credits. They also did a remake of the C-130 landing on a carrier deck, again copying a real life incident.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 6:59:33 AM EDT

its*
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 7:06:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 7:09:08 AM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By superbowtie:


Totally needs made into a motivational poster.  Sometimes you need just pointed in the right direction, sometimes you need shoved 88 miles by a fighter jet.
View Quote




 
Nah.




Make it a feature film.




Sandra Bullock can play the pilot.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 8:40:59 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By dogsplat:

  Nah.


Make it a feature film.


Sandra Bullock can play the pilot.
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Originally Posted By dogsplat:
Originally Posted By superbowtie:
Totally needs made into a motivational poster.  Sometimes you need just pointed in the right direction, sometimes you need shoved 88 miles by a fighter jet.

  Nah.


Make it a feature film.


Sandra Bullock can play the pilot.


Only if she's wearing a tank top+boy shorts under her G-Suit.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 8:55:19 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BobCole:
JAG did an episode with that happening & listed WHY they did it during the credits. They also did a remake of the C-130 landing on a carrier deck, again copying a real life incident.
View Quote

Was going to post this, Great show.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:04:07 AM EDT
They would have never promoted his ass in the 2015 military.. No more ballsy officers like this left
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:08:09 AM EDT
It's difficult to believe that its even possible.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:19:27 AM EDT
Impressive flying skills.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:22:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:23:38 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By skytrooper01:
They would have never promoted his ass in the 2015 military.. No more ballsy officers like this left
View Quote

Yup.  The shit that folks did in Vietnam would lead to piles of paperwork today.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:37:07 AM EDT
Now THAT's a true wingman

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 9:42:03 AM EDT
Couldn't find C130 story, any links?

Awesome reading, love the older generations and the pride and morals they showed
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:19:23 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NathanL:
Guy led an interesting life, not just Vietnam. Pretty interesting read.


http://airportjournals.com/bob-pardo-stuck-between-a-medal-and-a-court-martial-part-2/
View Quote



Interesting story.  It sucks that he got all tied up into the Corporate aviation in Colorado.    Put all that effort into running the Coors flight department, just to see it disbanded.   Then worked for  Mayo Aviation.    Fuckin bottom feeders.  Worse than being captured by the NVA.  

Cool guy.  I wish I had known about him when I worked at Centennial.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:29:53 AM EDT
No where near as heroic as Aman, but I did the same exact thing with 4x4 trucks with a buddy who's truck broke down 80 miles from home.

He had a spare tire at the rear of his truck and I had a push bar on the front of mine.

On the down hills of the deserted hyway I could get his truck up to 65mph, on the up hills he could limp it in 4 low (his transfer case was seized in 4 low)

We stuck together for a 5 hour ride home.

Again, not to equate what these airmen did, that was brave beyond words, but just to say buddies stick together and figure it out, that's what buddies do.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:30:59 AM EDT
So I mentioned the tankers that went outside of the rules to save crews, but here's a quick narrative of a couple:

   There was some good fortune as well in the May 31, 1967, Young Tiger mission over the Gulf of Tonkin, when a KC-135 tanker commanded by Maj. John H. Casteel saved six Navy aircraft with a complex and totally unscheduled refueling. The KC-135's original mission was to refuel two F-104 Starfighters, using the drogue adapter that the probe-equipped F-104s required. Casteel's tanker refueled the two F-104s and was then told of an emergency involving two Navy KA-3 "Whale" tanker aircraft, which also used probes.    

   The first Whale hooked up, indicating that it had only three minutes' usable fuel. Its systems had malfunctioned, and it could not use fuel it had in its refueling tanks. After transferring 2,300 pounds, the KC-135 then refueled the second KA-3 just as it was notified that two Navy F-8 Crusaders were on scene and short of fuel.

   One of the F-8 fighters had only 300 pounds remaining and immediately hooked up with the second Whale even as it was taking on fuel from the KC-135, initiating history's first trilevel refueling. As this was going on, the first KA-3 shared its slender fuel supply with the second Crusader. It then moved into position to refuel again from the KC-135.

   So far Casteel and his crew had had a pretty productive day, refueling the F-104s, and saving two KA-3s and two F-8s.

   However, the action was not yet complete. Two Navy F-4 Phantoms now arrived on scene, and neither had sufficient fuel to return to their carrier. Already low on fuel itself, the KC-135 turned south toward Da Nang, refueling the two F-4s en route.

   When it landed, the KC-135 had less than 10,000 pounds of fuel remaining for its own use. The boom operator, MSgt. Nathan C. Campbell, had earned his pay, saving no fewer than six Navy aircraft. Casteel's crew, including the copilot, Capt. Richard L. Trail, and the navigator, Capt. Dean L. Hoar, received Distinguished Flying Crosses for the action. The crew subsequently was awarded the Mackay Trophy.
View Quote


   In May 1967, a KC-135 flown by Maj. Alvin L. Lewis battled through violent thunderstorms to locate two F-105s that were critically short on fuel. Lewis found the F-105s in a clear area, and put his tanker into a 20-degree dive so that he could position himself in front of the first fighter, which had already flamed out. The Thud was gliding earthward, its pilot preparing to eject, when the diving tanker passed in front to a refueling position. All check lists and preliminaries were forgotten as the F-105 hooked up and took on enough fuel to air-start the engine. The tanker transferred a little fuel, then increased its dive angle to 30 degrees to get enough air through the intake of the fighter to spool it up to starting RPM. Lewis then refueled the second F-105, itself now about ready to flame out. Both 105s made it home.
View Quote


Link
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:39:03 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
So I mentioned the tankers that went outside of the rules to save crews, but here's a quick narrative of a couple:





Link
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Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
So I mentioned the tankers that went outside of the rules to save crews, but here's a quick narrative of a couple:

   There was some good fortune as well in the May 31, 1967, Young Tiger mission over the Gulf of Tonkin, when a KC-135 tanker commanded by Maj. John H. Casteel saved six Navy aircraft with a complex and totally unscheduled refueling. The KC-135's original mission was to refuel two F-104 Starfighters, using the drogue adapter that the probe-equipped F-104s required. Casteel's tanker refueled the two F-104s and was then told of an emergency involving two Navy KA-3 "Whale" tanker aircraft, which also used probes.    

   The first Whale hooked up, indicating that it had only three minutes' usable fuel. Its systems had malfunctioned, and it could not use fuel it had in its refueling tanks. After transferring 2,300 pounds, the KC-135 then refueled the second KA-3 just as it was notified that two Navy F-8 Crusaders were on scene and short of fuel.

   One of the F-8 fighters had only 300 pounds remaining and immediately hooked up with the second Whale even as it was taking on fuel from the KC-135, initiating history's first trilevel refueling. As this was going on, the first KA-3 shared its slender fuel supply with the second Crusader. It then moved into position to refuel again from the KC-135.

   So far Casteel and his crew had had a pretty productive day, refueling the F-104s, and saving two KA-3s and two F-8s.

   However, the action was not yet complete. Two Navy F-4 Phantoms now arrived on scene, and neither had sufficient fuel to return to their carrier. Already low on fuel itself, the KC-135 turned south toward Da Nang, refueling the two F-4s en route.

   When it landed, the KC-135 had less than 10,000 pounds of fuel remaining for its own use. The boom operator, MSgt. Nathan C. Campbell, had earned his pay, saving no fewer than six Navy aircraft. Casteel's crew, including the copilot, Capt. Richard L. Trail, and the navigator, Capt. Dean L. Hoar, received Distinguished Flying Crosses for the action. The crew subsequently was awarded the Mackay Trophy.


   In May 1967, a KC-135 flown by Maj. Alvin L. Lewis battled through violent thunderstorms to locate two F-105s that were critically short on fuel. Lewis found the F-105s in a clear area, and put his tanker into a 20-degree dive so that he could position himself in front of the first fighter, which had already flamed out. The Thud was gliding earthward, its pilot preparing to eject, when the diving tanker passed in front to a refueling position. All check lists and preliminaries were forgotten as the F-105 hooked up and took on enough fuel to air-start the engine. The tanker transferred a little fuel, then increased its dive angle to 30 degrees to get enough air through the intake of the fighter to spool it up to starting RPM. Lewis then refueled the second F-105, itself now about ready to flame out. Both 105s made it home.


Link


Thanks for posting.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:42:01 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By NotoriousBRT:
There is an episode of "Dogfights" that includes the Korea incident. Poor guy got his ass saved and then ejected over water, got tangled in his chute and drowned.

Gutsy bastards, they were.
View Quote



I remember that story. Dogfights was an incredible show back when History still put out quality history programs.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:44:00 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2015 10:44:50 AM EDT by subcomunic8r]
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Originally Posted By LaRue_Tactical:


Did the C-130 stick to the carrier's deck ?
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Originally Posted By LaRue_Tactical:
Originally Posted By BobCole:
JAG did an episode with that happening & listed WHY they did it during the credits. They also did a remake of the C-130 landing on a carrier deck, again copying a real life incident.


Did the C-130 stick to the carrier's deck ?


Yes it did.

Originally Posted By bansil:
Couldn't find C130 story, any links?

Awesome reading, love the older generations and the pride and morals they showed




http://www.theaviationzone.com/factsheets/c130_forrestal.asp
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:47:31 AM EDT
Wow
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:48:37 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
So I mentioned the tankers that went outside of the rules to save crews, but here's a quick narrative of a couple:





Link
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
So I mentioned the tankers that went outside of the rules to save crews, but here's a quick narrative of a couple:

   There was some good fortune as well in the May 31, 1967, Young Tiger mission over the Gulf of Tonkin, when a KC-135 tanker commanded by Maj. John H. Casteel saved six Navy aircraft with a complex and totally unscheduled refueling. The KC-135's original mission was to refuel two F-104 Starfighters, using the drogue adapter that the probe-equipped F-104s required. Casteel's tanker refueled the two F-104s and was then told of an emergency involving two Navy KA-3 "Whale" tanker aircraft, which also used probes.    

   The first Whale hooked up, indicating that it had only three minutes' usable fuel. Its systems had malfunctioned, and it could not use fuel it had in its refueling tanks. After transferring 2,300 pounds, the KC-135 then refueled the second KA-3 just as it was notified that two Navy F-8 Crusaders were on scene and short of fuel.

   One of the F-8 fighters had only 300 pounds remaining and immediately hooked up with the second Whale even as it was taking on fuel from the KC-135, initiating history's first trilevel refueling. As this was going on, the first KA-3 shared its slender fuel supply with the second Crusader. It then moved into position to refuel again from the KC-135.

   So far Casteel and his crew had had a pretty productive day, refueling the F-104s, and saving two KA-3s and two F-8s.

   However, the action was not yet complete. Two Navy F-4 Phantoms now arrived on scene, and neither had sufficient fuel to return to their carrier. Already low on fuel itself, the KC-135 turned south toward Da Nang, refueling the two F-4s en route.

   When it landed, the KC-135 had less than 10,000 pounds of fuel remaining for its own use. The boom operator, MSgt. Nathan C. Campbell, had earned his pay, saving no fewer than six Navy aircraft. Casteel's crew, including the copilot, Capt. Richard L. Trail, and the navigator, Capt. Dean L. Hoar, received Distinguished Flying Crosses for the action. The crew subsequently was awarded the Mackay Trophy.


   In May 1967, a KC-135 flown by Maj. Alvin L. Lewis battled through violent thunderstorms to locate two F-105s that were critically short on fuel. Lewis found the F-105s in a clear area, and put his tanker into a 20-degree dive so that he could position himself in front of the first fighter, which had already flamed out. The Thud was gliding earthward, its pilot preparing to eject, when the diving tanker passed in front to a refueling position. All check lists and preliminaries were forgotten as the F-105 hooked up and took on enough fuel to air-start the engine. The tanker transferred a little fuel, then increased its dive angle to 30 degrees to get enough air through the intake of the fighter to spool it up to starting RPM. Lewis then refueled the second F-105, itself now about ready to flame out. Both 105s made it home.


Link


Damn.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:54:48 AM EDT
It wasn't just C-130s that were considered for carrier operations.  The CIA tested and prepared to use U-2s off of carriers.

Link Posted: 9/4/2015 10:55:53 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By 0100010:
Damn.
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My instructor in tech school was an old retired crew chief who worked 135s during Vietnam.  It was a different time back then as he described it.
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 11:01:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By subcomunic8r:
Originally Posted By LaRue_Tactical:
Originally Posted By BobCole:
JAG did an episode with that happening & listed WHY they did it during the credits. They also did a remake of the C-130 landing on a carrier deck, again copying a real life incident.


Did the C-130 stick to the carrier's deck ?


Yes it did.

Originally Posted By bansil:
Couldn't find C130 story, any links?

Awesome reading, love the older generations and the pride and morals they showed


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ar-poc38C84

http://www.theaviationzone.com/factsheets/c130_forrestal.asp


C130 is a beast
Link Posted: 9/4/2015 11:36:43 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By James23:
It's difficult to believe that its even possible.
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Not too unlike aerial refueling....though obviously this was a far more incredible feat given the circumstances
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