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Posted: 1/10/2006 9:03:27 AM EDT
Can some one explain what the diffrence is I currently have 7.0 installed on my computer and this guy at work has Cs2 he is going to sell it to me and was wondering if its worth it to purchase it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:06:48 AM EDT
not much difference as far as I know. CS2 takes about 15 seconds longer to start up. CS2 has some cool features.

BTW, go to adobe.com and download the trial program.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:09:58 AM EDT
download the 30 day trial...

If you shoot digital cameras in RAW mode, it's a MUST, IMHO.

If you don't... there are several nice features, but nothing that I would consider a huge improvement.

As far as I see it, they've made a LOT of workflow issues sped up, particularly with RAW processing... a better and most importantly SEPARATE program that replaces the internal file browser... some nicer filters and better resizing... but like I said, if you don't shoot camera RAW files, I wouldn't spend TOO much money on upgrading from 7 to 9 (CS2).
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:10:17 AM EDT
I'm running Photoshop CS. I think that's the same thing as 7.0, but not sure.

I haven't checked out CS2 yet.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:12:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By steenkybastage:
download the 30 day trial...

If you shoot digital cameras in RAW mode, it's a MUST, IMHO.

If you don't... there are several nice features, but nothing that I would consider a huge improvement.

As far as I see it, they've made a LOT of workflow issues sped up, particularly with RAW processing... a better and most importantly SEPARATE program that replaces the internal file browser... some nicer filters and better resizing... but like I said, if you don't shoot camera RAW files, I wouldn't spend TOO much money on upgrading from 7 to 9 (CS2).


Okay really stupid question but what is Raw mode and I assume it is the way a camera take pictures..

And without knowing anymore then what you just said about it can any camera take pictures in " raw" mode..
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:15:38 AM EDT
CS2 requires online registration and is limited (I think) to one computer. 7.0 does not.

If you have more than one home computer (and laptop(s) you should be able to run whatever program you buy on as many computer as you want for your own personal use There have also been some issues with getting new registration codes if you have to reload everything on your computer.

Think the RAW format does require the newer version though (or someone else's photo package)

Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:23:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By gaspain:
not much difference as far as I know. CS2 takes about 15 seconds longer to start up. CS2 has some cool features.

BTW, go to adobe.com and download the trial program.



Again with the BS. Unless you got a really crappy computer with little RAM (which you don't according to the other post), no way it takes an additional 15 seconds. It doesn't even take 15 seconds total on my laptop.

The difference is huge if you shoot in RAW mode. Bridge by itself is worth the price of the upgrade. If you edit computer generated graphics, the added capablity to work in 16 bit mode might come in handy.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:25:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dv8xbox:

Originally Posted By steenkybastage:
download the 30 day trial...

If you shoot digital cameras in RAW mode, it's a MUST, IMHO.

If you don't... there are several nice features, but nothing that I would consider a huge improvement.

As far as I see it, they've made a LOT of workflow issues sped up, particularly with RAW processing... a better and most importantly SEPARATE program that replaces the internal file browser... some nicer filters and better resizing... but like I said, if you don't shoot camera RAW files, I wouldn't spend TOO much money on upgrading from 7 to 9 (CS2).


Okay really stupid question but what is Raw mode and I assume it is the way a camera take pictures..

And without knowing anymore then what you just said about it can any camera take pictures in " raw" mode..



Many digital cameras, like the Canon Rebel and up (SLR) or Nikon brand similar models have multiple types of images they can capture on their memory stick.

Many other cameras can only capture JPG images... which the higher end cameras can also do optionally. The JPG files can be the same resolution, but they are compressed and don't contain as much information to begin with. This isn't usually an issue to most people who just want to take pictures and email them, however in situations where people want a lot more control or are taking pictures for profit, JPG can be a limitation.

The highest quality pictures are the RAW files, which are not compressed, and only cointain the raw data that the sensor received from the lens. These files are then fed into a program (which CS and CS2 can do) which lets you adjust the raw file for color temperature, contrast, etc. All this is done with more information than a standard JPG file would give you, so you get better results making adjustments in this manner.

If you are a professional or it is a serious hobby, you could benefit greatly from RAW shooting in many situations. Most people, however, would find it a waste of time for the marginal benefits they would receive compared to the great amount of time required to adjust everything.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:25:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 9:26:43 AM EDT by roboman]

Originally Posted By Dv8xbox:

Originally Posted By steenkybastage:
download the 30 day trial...

If you shoot digital cameras in RAW mode, it's a MUST, IMHO.

If you don't... there are several nice features, but nothing that I would consider a huge improvement.

As far as I see it, they've made a LOT of workflow issues sped up, particularly with RAW processing... a better and most importantly SEPARATE program that replaces the internal file browser... some nicer filters and better resizing... but like I said, if you don't shoot camera RAW files, I wouldn't spend TOO much money on upgrading from 7 to 9 (CS2).


Okay really stupid question but what is Raw mode and I assume it is the way a camera take pictures..

And without knowing anymore then what you just said about it can any camera take pictures in " raw" mode..



Depends on what camera you have whether you can shoot in RAW or not.

Here's a quick take on RAW:


What is Raw Mode?

When a digital camera makes an exposure the imaging chip (whether it's CCD or CMOS) records the amount of light that has hit each pixel, or photo site. This is recorded as a voltage level. The camera's analog to digital circuitry now changes this analog voltage signal into a digital representation. Depending on the camera's circuitry either 12 or 14 bits of data are recorded. Incidentally, if the camera records 12 bits of data then each pixel can handle 4,096 brightness levels (2^12), and if 14 bit then it can record 16,384 different brightness levels (2^14). (To my knowledge no current imaging chip records a true 16 bits worth of data).

Of course what happens after you've taken the photograph depends on whether you have the camera set to save images to the memory card as raw files or JPGs.

If you've saved the file in raw mode when it is subsequently loaded into a raw conversion program and then saved to a TIFF or .PSD format file it can be exported in 16 bit mode. The 12 or 14 bits recorded by the camera are then spread over the full 16 bit workspace. If you've saved the file in-camera as a JPG than it is converted by the camera's software to 8 bit mode and you will only ever have 256 brightness levels to work with.



And pros and cons:



Reasons to Shoot JPG

— Files are smaller and therefore more of them fit on a card.

— For many applications image quality is more than sufficient (family snapshots, news images).

— Small files are more easily transmitted wirelessly and online. This is important to newspaper photographers.

— Many photographers don't have the time or inclination to post-process their files.

— Many cameras (especially digicams) can not shoot quickly when working in raw mode. Some lower-end models can't record raw files at all.

Reasons to Shoot Raw

— A raw file is comparable to the latent image contained in an exposed but undeveloped piece of film. It holds exactly what the imaging chip recorded. Nothing more. Nothing less. This means that the photographer is able to extract the maximum possible image quality, whether now or in the future. A good analogy with the traditional world of film is that you have the opportunity to use a different type of developer or development time at any point in the future if one comes along that you think might do a better job of processing the image.

— Raw files have not had while balance set. They are tagged with whatever the camera's setting was, (either that which was manually set or via auto-white-balance), but the actual data has not been changed. This allows one to set any colour temperature and white balance one wishes after the fact with no image degradation. It should be understood that once the file has been converted from the linear space and has had a gamma curve applied (such as in a JPG) white balance can no longer be properly done.

— File linearization and colour filter array (Bayer) conversion is done on a computer with a fast and powerful microprocessor. This allows much more sophisticated algorithms to be used than those done in a camera with its slower and less powerful processor and with less space for complex conversion programs.

— The raw file is tagged with contrast and saturation information as set in the camera by the user, but the actual image data has not been changed. The user is free to set these based on a per-image evaluation rather than use one or two generalized settings for all images taken.

— Possibly the biggest advantage of shooting raw is that one has a 16 bit image (post raw conversion) to work with. This means that the file has 65,536 levels to work with. This is opposed to a JPG file's 8 bit space with just 256 brightness levels available. This is important when editing an image, particularly if one is trying to open up shadows or alter brightness in any significant way.

Figures #1 and #2 below shows why. Assuming for this example a 5 stop dynamic range, you can see how much data is found in each of the brightness levels in the image. In other words with a 12 bit file the two darkest levels of the file combined have some 384 brightness levels to work with.

An 8 bit JPG file on the other hand has considerably less. Both the sRGB and Adobe RGB colour spaces use a gamma 2.2 encoding. Gamma encoding reallocates encoding levels from the upper f-stops into the lower f-stops to compensate for the human eye's greater sensitivity to absolute changes in the darker tone range. Therefore an 8 bit JPG file has just 47 brightness levels available in the bottom two stops. (The remaining levels out of 256 are for the f-stops beyond the 5 in this example).

Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:27:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dv8xbox:

Originally Posted By steenkybastage:
download the 30 day trial...

If you shoot digital cameras in RAW mode, it's a MUST, IMHO.

If you don't... there are several nice features, but nothing that I would consider a huge improvement.

As far as I see it, they've made a LOT of workflow issues sped up, particularly with RAW processing... a better and most importantly SEPARATE program that replaces the internal file browser... some nicer filters and better resizing... but like I said, if you don't shoot camera RAW files, I wouldn't spend TOO much money on upgrading from 7 to 9 (CS2).


Okay really stupid question but what is Raw mode and I assume it is the way a camera take pictures..

And without knowing anymore then what you just said about it can any camera take pictures in " raw" mode..



RAW is a file format that is little more than a data dump from the sensor. It results in better image quality, especially if you do major adjustments to your photos. Not all cameras can save in RAW mode.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:35:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 9:45:01 AM EDT by nightstalker]
The registration of the software (and de-authorization) looked pretty simple when I saw it used at my local Apple Macintosh User Group. It can be loaded on several machines but only "authorized" on one at a time. It seemed simple to go to the registration and just click on it (have to be connected to the net to do this like with Microsoft). Seems fair to me.

CS=Photoshop 8
CS2=9

The RAW converter tries to keep up with all the new Cameras (each seems to have unique RAW format) and that is the exasperating part. You buy the newest version and then find your camera RAW file is too new to be supported. It catches up in a while but......

RAW files are fairly proprietary in that they're not a stock file that can be read by a typical picture application like a .jpg. There are other RAW programs that can handle these files and most cameras that take them include a RAW file program to adjust them.

Bridge is a pretty good reason to upgrade. It would depend on whether you had a good filing system for your pics.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:41:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By chooper:
I'm running Photoshop CS. I think that's the same thing as 7.0, but not sure.

I haven't checked out CS2 yet.



I'm using CS and I used CS2 breifly one day at the school computer lab. Immediately noticed some differences that were a little annoying. I'm not in any hurry to run out and get it. CS is working just fine for me.

I don't know what major improvements or additional features CS2 has that CS doesn't. It's kind of irritating that they come out with new versions so fast as opposed to just allowing people to update their current versions with the new features. PS is way to expensive to be running out and buying the newest one every year.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 9:56:32 AM EDT
I just got CS2 a few months ago....I just can't register it

Should i use the money i saved to buy the book? Cause i am no guru...but i learn things fast
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 11:47:53 AM EDT
CS2's ability to work with RAW is extremely valuable. The RAW support alone warrants an upgrade.
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