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Posted: 5/6/2018 7:56:26 AM EDT
What settings do you normally use to shoot with? What do you regulate, and what do you let your camera regulate? I purchased a new camera yesterday, an entry level mirrorless, and read up on the three most important things to a camera and what they do: Shutterspeed, aperture, ISO. But who the fuck has time to play with the above when they are shooting pictures, especially time critical photos with action/movement or your kids?

So many damn modes in cameras these days. Intelligent, Intelligent+, Program Auto, Aperture Priority, Shutter Speed Priority, Manual, Scenes, blah blah blah blah.

I'm thinking on trying out the Intelligent or Intelligent+ from my camera, shooting with RAWs, and I can go back and edit the photo later if I want to. This camera will be for family photos only, I'm not getting hardcore into photography. I might buy a longer lens in the future however.

Any tips for a noob would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:00:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:00:01 AM EDT
Depends on the conditions. Aperture priority or shutter priority may give you some flexibility while reducing the total amount of input you need to control. I generally have my camera save both jpeg and RAW, JPEG in case anyone else wants photos or just doing aquick print, RAW in case I want to go back later and process them or do some faux HDR rendering.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:03:47 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
My camera is usually on manual.

It's not that hard once you've learned how everything relates together and have the muscle memory to adjust settings on the fly.

Then again, the D500 doesn't even have any of those automatic modes.
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The camera I bought, Sony Alpha 6000, is a point-n-shoot. I don't know if I would be able to adjust everything on the fly quick enough with it.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:06:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By HappyCamel:
Depends on the conditions. Aperture priority or shutter priority may give you some flexibility while reducing the total amount of input you need to control. I generally have my camera save both jpeg and RAW, JPEG in case anyone else wants photos or just doing aquick print, RAW in case I want to go back later and process them or do some faux HDR rendering.
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Yea I'm thinking on using the Aperture priority to control the depth of field (blurry background for portraits, or crisp background for other shots). And the shutter priority I can adjust shutter speed for action shots. I will probably leave ISO on Auto until I get good enough that I can adjust it too.

However if you set the ISO incorrectly, even a RAW image file you can't change it correct?
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:15:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/6/2018 8:18:33 AM EDT by flyhack72]
Almost always Manual.

The DSLRs that I use and teach with are easier/faster to deal with setting changes.

The Sony mirrorless Alphas that I use and teach with take longer to adjust settings due to the user interface and no touchscreen.

As stated before, once you know how to use the settings your photos will be much better. The whole "I'll fix it in post" approach can be problematic and may be more time consuming in the long run.

Also, remember that some settings/filters that you may use in your settings will alter your file, even if it is raw, so you can't alter it as much as you would like...or it becomes a much more time consuming process in post.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:21:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/6/2018 8:22:08 AM EDT by BobCole]
I have a Nikon D600. Most of my shots are in scene unless I need more shutter speed.

My .o2
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:23:30 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By flyhack72:
Almost always Manual.

The DSLRs that I use and teach with are easier/faster to deal with setting changes.

The Sony mirrorless Alphas that I use and teach with take longer to adjust settings due to the user interface and no touchscreen.

As stated before, once you know how to use the settings your photos will be much better. The whole "I'll fix it in post" approach can be problematic and may be more time consuming in the long run.
View Quote
Point n Shoots are harder to adjust than the other larger cameras, I bought it knowing that. Maybe when my kid(s) get older I'll get a nice 4-figure camera system.

It does take decent pictures in low light. This was taken in that Intelligent+ mode. F5.6, ISO 3200, 1/10 speed, 50mm focal. From what little I know, I would guess that high ISO and slow shutter speed to capture as much light as possible is what makes my baby's face look not as sharp as it could.

Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:26:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:27:08 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Point n Shoots are harder to adjust than the other larger cameras, I bought it knowing that. Maybe when my kid(s) get older I'll get a nice 4-figure camera system.

It does take decent pictures in low light. This was taken in that Intelligent+ mode. F5.6, ISO 3200, 1/10 speed, 50mm focal. From what little I know, I would guess that high ISO and slow shutter speed to capture as much light as possible is what makes my baby's face look not as sharp as it could.

http://i63.tinypic.com/5vyeki.jpg
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Originally Posted By flyhack72:
Almost always Manual.

The DSLRs that I use and teach with are easier/faster to deal with setting changes.

The Sony mirrorless Alphas that I use and teach with take longer to adjust settings due to the user interface and no touchscreen.

As stated before, once you know how to use the settings your photos will be much better. The whole "I'll fix it in post" approach can be problematic and may be more time consuming in the long run.
Point n Shoots are harder to adjust than the other larger cameras, I bought it knowing that. Maybe when my kid(s) get older I'll get a nice 4-figure camera system.

It does take decent pictures in low light. This was taken in that Intelligent+ mode. F5.6, ISO 3200, 1/10 speed, 50mm focal. From what little I know, I would guess that high ISO and slow shutter speed to capture as much light as possible is what makes my baby's face look not as sharp as it could.

http://i63.tinypic.com/5vyeki.jpg
Here is another photo taken using the flash. F5.0, 1/60 speed, ISO 500, 51mm focal. Looks sharper, except for her nose and the pacifier. The focus is better around her eyes, ears and hair.

Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:27:48 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
The ISO is secondary here. At 50mm focal length, considering the 1.5x crop factor of the a6000, I would recommend shooting pictures at no slower than 1/80 handheld with or without any form of stabilization.

It's also entirely possible that focus was missed in general.
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Point n Shoots are harder to adjust than the other larger cameras, I bought it knowing that. Maybe when my kid(s) get older I'll get a nice 4-figure camera system.

It does take decent pictures in low light. This was taken in that Intelligent+ mode. F5.6, ISO 3200, 1/10 speed, 50mm focal. From what little I know, I would guess that high ISO and slow shutter speed to capture as much light as possible is what makes my baby's face look not as sharp as it could.

http://i63.tinypic.com/5vyeki.jpg
The ISO is secondary here. At 50mm focal length, considering the 1.5x crop factor of the a6000, I would recommend shooting pictures at no slower than 1/80 handheld with or without any form of stabilization.

It's also entirely possible that focus was missed in general.
Thank you for the advice, I will play around with this thing more today and experiment.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:28:00 AM EDT
Meter once carefully for the scene, decide on how much depth of field vs stop action you need - will help you decide aperture vs shutter speed.
You will be able to do this on the fly with some effort.
If all else fails, like a dinosaur just jumped out of a time warp & is about to consume you, Program Mode is the "point & shoot" mode on pro cameras.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:29:52 AM EDT
I'm almost always in Aperture Priority and set my ISO manually for the lighting conditions, and will adjust from there to keep my shutter speed in an acceptable range.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:32:46 AM EDT
Aperture priority for most things. Spot metering with one push exposure lock if I'm lucky enough to have interesting lighting.

All easier said than done, though.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:34:49 AM EDT
Run and shoot I use aperture priority. All videos which is what I mainly shoot are done in all manual but with auto focus
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:38:23 AM EDT
One of the biggest things has nothing to do with the camera. It's recognizing what makes for good lighting - windows, certain lights on or off, bouncing a flash, etc.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:40:18 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By L_JE:
One of the biggest things has nothing to do with the camera. It's recognizing what makes for good lighting - windows, certain lights on or off, bouncing a flash, etc.
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Yes, but sometimes you are helpless as to what lighting you actually have to use.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:47:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:49:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/6/2018 8:51:50 AM EDT by hatidua]
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Shutterspeed, aperture, ISO. But who the fuck has time to play with the above when they are shooting pictures.
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I do.

Think of it in terms of driving a car: there's a steering wheel, gas pedal, break pedal....who has time for all of those?!
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:55:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 8:57:31 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By hatidua:
I do.

Think of it in terms of driving a car: there's a steering wheel, gas pedal, break pedal....who has time for all of those?!
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Originally Posted By hatidua:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Shutterspeed, aperture, ISO. But who the fuck has time to play with the above when they are shooting pictures.
I do.

Think of it in terms of driving a car: there's a steering wheel, gas pedal, break pedal....who has time for all of those?!
I'm not putting my camera on a tripod capturing flowing rivers or beautiful mountains here.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:00:29 AM EDT
Most of the time, I shoot on "P" unless I'm unhappy with the results I'm getting. Usually only switch to A, S, or M when I know I need to do something like a longer exposure or change my depth of field.

I can attach my old M42 lenses to my camera body and shoot in Aperture Priority and manually focus.

Other than that, most of the time, the camera gets it right.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:01:18 AM EDT
put the camera on manual, find an object that approximates something you want to photograph, then take lots of pics while playing with the settings. The pics don't cost anything except time and you get to know your camera.

I took literally hundreds of pics of the window across the room while playing with settings when I first bought a DSLR.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:03:36 AM EDT
Lets make it simple, since you are starting out.

If you are shooting action, pick the shutter speed and let the camera deal with aperture (f-stop)

If you want to control depth of field, choose aperture and let camera control speed.

Once you understand what is happening with both, you can go manual and control both

Try to avoid letting the camera control everything. Once you get a grasp of how things work, manual becomes pretty simple
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:06:05 AM EDT
Based on situation... quick happy family snaps? Put it on the "sports" setting and just worry about composition.

A moment you have more time for, like a sleeping baby, family portrait, great sunset or something similar? Set it up and go full manual.

That's how I do it anyway.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:17:34 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:19:58 AM EDT
Holy Batman , lenses are expensive

But probably for the reason rifle glass is lol
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:29:20 AM EDT
I normally start in AP, might have to switch to manual depending on lighting. If I have my light meter will go straight to manual. I almost always shoot

with a custom white balance.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:30:13 AM EDT
I think everyone has different purposes and reasons for taking pictures, so how those pictures are taken might vary quite a bit from person to person.
Currently my main camera is a Nikon D90.
Most of the time I leave it in aperture priority and simply adjust the stops for the depth of field I'm looking for, the camera does a pretty good job of making the shutter speed adjustment but I also check the histogram and vary the EV setting if needed.
I leave the ISO setting in automatic mode but I set the upper limit on how high I'll let it go (usually 1600 or 3200).
I do shoot full manual on occasion but that is usually in low light or when I need to capture higher speed subjects, normally I just go with either aperture or shutter speed priority.
I have shot in RAW but for me and my for purposes I don't want to spend the time post-processing only to get a shot that can be made by shooting .jpg - yeah, full control of the picture while post-processing RAW's can most certainly result in a better final product, but I just don't want to spend the time doing it.
I also photograph astrophotography, but I won't even go into that here - the camera setup for that is most certainly NOT normal.....
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:34:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:36:29 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
This setup is often more valuable than the vehicle used to transport it:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/56693/DSCN3760-Edit-435880.jpg
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Holy Batman , lenses are expensive

But probably for the reason rifle glass is lol
This setup is often more valuable than the vehicle used to transport it:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/56693/DSCN3760-Edit-435880.jpg
Manfotto tripod -
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 9:42:37 AM EDT
Oh man

What you are asking is, as a race car driver, what are the vehicle settings?

There is NO magic setting. And what roughly works on one camera might not be the best on another.

There is no shame in leaving it in the safe harbor "green" settings. Just understand you're not going to get the true power of that camera letting it decide everything.

Go hit youtube, and prepare to go down a multiyear rabbit hole. Don't get discouraged, and don't give up. I started taking pictures at 8-9, I'm almost 48 now, and still learn something on a regular basis.

It's almost like cooking; you won't learn if you don't get out and burn some noodles

Congrats! (remember, don't invest in bodies - invest in glass)
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:00:08 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Yes, but sometimes you are helpless as to what lighting you actually have to use.
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Originally Posted By L_JE:
One of the biggest things has nothing to do with the camera. It's recognizing what makes for good lighting - windows, certain lights on or off, bouncing a flash, etc.
Yes, but sometimes you are helpless as to what lighting you actually have to use.
Ah, but you have a bigger hand in this than you may think. Sometimes it's just putting your children's toys in front of the window with the best lighting, rather than where they'd normally have their things. Other times, it's doing bizarre, contrived stuff like pulling lampshades and setting up reflectors. And as your children get older, they will sort of hate you for this, and you'll have photos of hands, textbooks, menus, and whatever else they can grab to shield themselves from dad's camera.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:06:37 AM EDT
tagged
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:09:52 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/6/2018 10:10:16 AM EDT by geekz0r]
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
What settings do you normally use to shoot with? What do you regulate, and what do you let your camera regulate? I purchased a new camera yesterday, an entry level mirrorless, and read up on the three most important things to a camera and what they do: Shutterspeed, aperture, ISO. But who the fuck has time to play with the above when they are shooting pictures, especially time critical photos with action/movement or your kids?

So many damn modes in cameras these days. Intelligent, Intelligent+, Program Auto, Aperture Priority, Shutter Speed Priority, Manual, Scenes, blah blah blah blah.

I'm thinking on trying out the Intelligent or Intelligent+ from my camera, shooting with RAWs, and I can go back and edit the photo later if I want to. This camera will be for family photos only, I'm not getting hardcore into photography. I might buy a longer lens in the future however.

Any tips for a noob would be appreciated.
View Quote
I'm on a mirrorless too. To be honest, I usually shoot manual and use the in-camera meter to estimate exposure. I only use auto for specific things, like taking selfies (my camera has that ability) or when I need a quick tip on what settings I may want to use.

Also, if you plan on editing photos later no matter which settings you use, NEVER use automatic white balance. Use straight up normal for daylight, and then balance it yourself as needed. (Your camera should have white balance settings called tungsten or fluorescent - for shooting when the scene is lit by household lamps etc). The reason behind this is that your WB will be all over the place if on auto, and it may make it harder to group edit photos later.

Shooting with Raw... I've heard for and against it. I say, what the hell go for it. The worst thing you'll find is that it eats up more space on your card vs jpgs. Also editing in raw is awesome because any changes you make don't actually alter the original photo.

Lastly, once you're done editing a photo I'd recommend saving it as a TIF or a photshop file (depending on what program you're going to use) if you want to preserve layers. If you don't care about that, save it as a PNG. Fuck JPGs, cos every time you open and save a jpg it gets a little bit more compressed which makes it look like crap.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:11:36 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Zack3g:
This setup is often more valuable than the vehicle used to transport it:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/56693/DSCN3760-Edit-435880.jpg
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Holy Batman , lenses are expensive

But probably for the reason rifle glass is lol
This setup is often more valuable than the vehicle used to transport it:

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/56693/DSCN3760-Edit-435880.jpg
Wow, I'd throw that in my gun safe for sure when not in use lol
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:12:52 AM EDT
Manual mode when shooting with strobe lights, aperture priority when sooting available light. Shutter priority when shutter speed (blur/no blur) needs to be controlled. Keep the ISO setting as low as you can.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:16:10 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By high_order1:
Oh man

What you are asking is, as a race car driver, what are the vehicle settings?

There is NO magic setting. And what roughly works on one camera might not be the best on another.

There is no shame in leaving it in the safe harbor "green" settings. Just understand you're not going to get the true power of that camera letting it decide everything.

Go hit youtube, and prepare to go down a multiyear rabbit hole. Don't get discouraged, and don't give up. I started taking pictures at 8-9, I'm almost 48 now, and still learn something on a regular basis.

It's almost like cooking; you won't learn if you don't get out and burn some noodles

Congrats! (remember, don't invest in bodies - invest in glass)
View Quote
Yep, time to tinker and learn. Like someone else said, tinkering is free, its not like I'm having film developed.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:21:42 AM EDT
I shoot on manual. I choose shudder speed and aperture based on the subject I'm shooting, and the effect I'm after.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:35:12 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By geekz0r:
I'm on a mirrorless too. To be honest, I usually shoot manual and use the in-camera meter to estimate exposure. I only use auto for specific things, like taking selfies (my camera has that ability) or when I need a quick tip on what settings I may want to use.

Also, if you plan on editing photos later no matter which settings you use, NEVER use automatic white balance. Use straight up normal for daylight, and then balance it yourself as needed. (Your camera should have white balance settings called tungsten or fluorescent - for shooting when the scene is lit by household lamps etc). The reason behind this is that your WB will be all over the place if on auto, and it may make it harder to group edit photos later.

Shooting with Raw... I've heard for and against it. I say, what the hell go for it. The worst thing you'll find is that it eats up more space on your card vs jpgs. Also editing in raw is awesome because any changes you make don't actually alter the original photo.

Lastly, once you're done editing a photo I'd recommend saving it as a TIF or a photshop file (depending on what program you're going to use) if you want to preserve layers. If you don't care about that, save it as a PNG. Fuck JPGs, cos every time you open and save a jpg it gets a little bit more compressed which makes it look like crap.
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Originally Posted By geekz0r:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
What settings do you normally use to shoot with? What do you regulate, and what do you let your camera regulate? I purchased a new camera yesterday, an entry level mirrorless, and read up on the three most important things to a camera and what they do: Shutterspeed, aperture, ISO. But who the fuck has time to play with the above when they are shooting pictures, especially time critical photos with action/movement or your kids?

So many damn modes in cameras these days. Intelligent, Intelligent+, Program Auto, Aperture Priority, Shutter Speed Priority, Manual, Scenes, blah blah blah blah.

I'm thinking on trying out the Intelligent or Intelligent+ from my camera, shooting with RAWs, and I can go back and edit the photo later if I want to. This camera will be for family photos only, I'm not getting hardcore into photography. I might buy a longer lens in the future however.

Any tips for a noob would be appreciated.
I'm on a mirrorless too. To be honest, I usually shoot manual and use the in-camera meter to estimate exposure. I only use auto for specific things, like taking selfies (my camera has that ability) or when I need a quick tip on what settings I may want to use.

Also, if you plan on editing photos later no matter which settings you use, NEVER use automatic white balance. Use straight up normal for daylight, and then balance it yourself as needed. (Your camera should have white balance settings called tungsten or fluorescent - for shooting when the scene is lit by household lamps etc). The reason behind this is that your WB will be all over the place if on auto, and it may make it harder to group edit photos later.

Shooting with Raw... I've heard for and against it. I say, what the hell go for it. The worst thing you'll find is that it eats up more space on your card vs jpgs. Also editing in raw is awesome because any changes you make don't actually alter the original photo.

Lastly, once you're done editing a photo I'd recommend saving it as a TIF or a photshop file (depending on what program you're going to use) if you want to preserve layers. If you don't care about that, save it as a PNG. Fuck JPGs, cos every time you open and save a jpg it gets a little bit more compressed which makes it look like crap.
Interesting tidbit on the white balance, I'll go see what my camera offers.

Yes it offers like 10 presets, including one custom. I'll make sure i adjust that accordingly.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:42:25 AM EDT
Lol, just found the little wheel on the back rotates. For being a point in shoot camera, the control layout is nice.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 10:47:28 AM EDT
I generally leave mine on Aperture priority setting. Choose a setting according to the depth of field I want, then make sure the Shutter speed and ISO are reasonable for what I want. Occasionally when I really want to freeze motion (or create a blur) I'll use shutter priority.

BTW is this book GREAT.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:01:45 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Mazeman:
I generally leave mine on Aperture priority setting. Choose a setting according to the depth of field I want, then make sure the Shutter speed and ISO are reasonable for what I want. Occasionally when I really want to freeze motion (or create a blur) I'll use shutter priority.

BTW is this book GREAT.
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Added to my list, thanks.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:08:19 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Lol, just found the little wheel on the back rotates. For being a point in shoot camera, the control layout is nice.
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The A6000 is far from a point and shoot camera. This is a very nice camera, and it will take some time to become proficient in bouncing between modes and settings.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:14:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/6/2018 11:17:20 AM EDT by trperic]
I shoot A mode, ie Aperture Priority, exclusively. Using this mode, I adjust the aperture size and the ISO to control the shutter speed.

If I'm shooting moving objects, then I will open up the aperture and/or/maybe dial up the ISO one step or so in order to lower the shutter speed to reduce any blur.

If I am shooting a stationary object with tons of time, then I will use manual mode, but out and about I leave it on Aperture Priority because it's just so much faster. I'm a little too slow for manual mode to work when I might only have a second or two to get the photo.

Using Nikon, I shoot EVERYTHING in RAW / NEF. If I don't need to make any edits, then Nikon's Capture NX-D software can just spit out the JPEG of the photo based on what my camera settings were. It's super easy and quick, and there is NO reason to shoot JPEG only in my opinion. Despite common belief, you do not have to manually edit a RAW/NEF file unless you are just wanting to change something, and when shooting in RAW/NEF you at least have the ability to go back and fix things, where JPEG you pretty much are stuck with what you shot.

------

The larger your aperture the shorter your field of view. I noticed one of the pictures of the child, the focus point was a few inches behind their face (the hair on the side of their head was in focus, but the face was not).

If using phase detection auto focus then make sure that your focus point is a point with high contrast, or at least a point with some detail, otherwise you will miss it and end up with a blurry photo. Never use area/automatic autofocus, EVER, you need to tell the camera exactly where to focus so you can control your depth of field. Never let the camera do that for you. If you have your focus point on an area of soft smooth skin, then you are likely to have a blurry photo. If you make your focus point let's say on the corner of an eye, etc, then you are more likely to have a photo that is in focus.

--

ISO, I generally shoot 200 ISO outdoors and 400 ISO indoors. That will vary some, but it has worked for me. The lower your ISO then the less grainy your image will look, however you want your shutter to be fast enough to not have any blur either.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:18:39 AM EDT
Always in manual, auto ISO, auto focus, files saved in jpeg &Raw.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:27:06 AM EDT
I use manual. But I also have a camera that puts those at your fingertips.

If you have to go into a menu then yeah, manual isn't really viable.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:28:38 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Mazeman:

BTW is this book GREAT.
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Best advice in this thread, and the first you should follow.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:30:20 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Point n Shoots are harder to adjust than the other larger cameras, I bought it knowing that. Maybe when my kid(s) get older I'll get a nice 4-figure camera system.

It does take decent pictures in low light. This was taken in that Intelligent+ mode. F5.6, ISO 3200, 1/10 speed, 50mm focal. From what little I know, I would guess that high ISO and slow shutter speed to capture as much light as possible is what makes my baby's face look not as sharp as it could.

http://i63.tinypic.com/5vyeki.jpg
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And lack of indirect lighting...flash or.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:34:57 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By L_JE:
The A6000 is far from a point and shoot camera. This is a very nice camera, and it will take some time to become proficient in bouncing between modes and settings.
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Originally Posted By L_JE:
Originally Posted By Cobalty2004:
Lol, just found the little wheel on the back rotates. For being a point in shoot camera, the control layout is nice.
The A6000 is far from a point and shoot camera. This is a very nice camera, and it will take some time to become proficient in bouncing between modes and settings.
I was referring to the body style.
Link Posted: 5/6/2018 11:36:44 AM EDT
Fwiw the pro that did our wedding I asked how he adjusted his camera. He said auto.

His explanation was simple. "Most all my attention is on composition, not trying to adjust the camera". The pictures were amazing.
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