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Posted: 6/25/2017 11:29:01 AM EDT
http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-news/ci_31091045/cu-boulder-student-recounts-harrowing-fall-rescue-at

On the Bastille, a popular formation at Eldo, the rock is a bit slippery/polished.  He had on a helmet and was on a rope, and his protection held, but take a look at what's left of his helmet after the fall.

Link Posted: 6/25/2017 11:51:47 AM EDT
What about my loud pipes and freedom
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 11:55:11 AM EDT
Even more important, belayers need to wear a helmet.
Especially on sport climbs the belayer is in more danger from rockfall than the climber and if a rock severely injures or kills the belayer the climber is probably going to be hurt or killed as well unless he can immediately clip into a bolt.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 11:58:33 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By NM_desert_rat:
Even more important, belayers need to wear a helmet.
Especially on sport climbs the belayer is in more danger from rockfall than the climber and if a rock severely injures or kills the belayer the climber is probably going to be hurt or killed as well unless he can immediately clip into a bolt.
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This I've had rock fall on to my buddy while I was on lead. If he wasn't wearing a helmet he probably either be dead or severely brain damaged. Also always assume there will be loose rock on routes that are seldom climbed...
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 12:42:07 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By whiskerz:
What about my loud pipes and freedom
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One trip to TIRR in Houston where many of the rehab patients who were freedom loving riders are now barely functioning vegetables should cure you of the urge to go without a helmet !
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:19:28 PM EDT
Side note, the ad on the side of the page, for the Peace Corps, featuring the latest in protective rape whistle technology.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:31:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:38:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NM_desert_rat:
Even more important, belayers need to wear a helmet.
Especially on sport climbs the belayer is in more danger from rockfall than the climber and if a rock severely injures or kills the belayer the climber is probably going to be hurt or killed as well unless he can immediately clip into a bolt.
View Quote
That would seem to assume that the climber is climbing with constant tension from the belay.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:44:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/25/2017 1:46:01 PM EDT by Azygos]
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Originally Posted By zZClintEastwoodZz:

This I've had rock fall on to my buddy while I was on lead. If he wasn't wearing a helmet he probably either be dead or severely brain damaged. Also always assume there will be loose rock on routes that are seldom climbed...
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I cringe to think about that, as all my belaying was helmetless back in the early 1990s. Now, I don't even have time to climb. My brand new rope & harnesses, used only once for 15-30 minutes on a gentle and non-abrasive top-rope route for my wife, have since been in a covered storage bin past their official shelf life. They've had no other UV exposure or contact with chemicals, so I'd probably use them again anyway. If I had anyone to go with.

Having a non-climbing spouse and kids, with no interest in learning, is similar to my situation with scuba gear and my one remaining motorcycle riding jacket. It all sits in storage as a quiet reminder of a bucket list slowly getting dropped in the shredder.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:46:10 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By whiskerz:
What about my loud pipes and freedom
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i'm sure his tailpipe made some serious noise as he headed down.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:46:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NM_desert_rat:
Even more important, belayers need to wear a helmet.
Especially on sport climbs the belayer is in more danger from rockfall than the climber and if a rock severely injures or kills the belayer the climber is probably going to be hurt or killed as well unless he can immediately clip into a bolt.
View Quote
I was belaying at Whitesides Mountain in NC when I heard a faint whistling sound getting louder and louder.  I hollered "Rock!" and headed for cover, along with everyone else standing nearby.

I never did see the rock,but after falling from several hundred feet, it made a pretty loud boom when it hit and sent shrapnel everywhere.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 1:59:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/25/2017 2:02:11 PM EDT by NM_desert_rat]
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Originally Posted By CWO:
That would seem to assume that the climber is climbing with constant tension from the belay.
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If you're belaying with a ATC style friction device the climber would be basically free solo climbing once the belayer was unconscious, one slip and you're done until you can direct clip into the next bolt or insert gear to clip off to.
With a GriGri autolock you'd be a bit safer but you'd potentially be stuck in place swinging (on a steep overhanging climb) until help arrived or you were able to self rescue by tying off the rope to a single bolt (single bolt rappels are killers) and then making Prusik knots or a triple biner friction device to allow you a controlled descent, unless you carry a ATC or Fig8 on your sport gear (not likely).
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 7:56:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/25/2017 7:59:08 PM EDT by Azygos]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NM_desert_rat:

If you're belaying with a ATC style friction device the climber would be basically free solo climbing once the belayer was unconscious, one slip and you're done until you can direct clip into the next bolt or insert gear to clip off to.
With a GriGri autolock you'd be a bit safer but you'd potentially be stuck in place swinging (on a steep overhanging climb) until help arrived or you were able to self rescue by tying off the rope to a single bolt (single bolt rappels are killers) and then making Prusik knots or a triple biner friction device to allow you a controlled descent, unless you carry a ATC or Fig8 on your sport gear (not likely).
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You could always do a Münter hitch descent, but that still isn't optimal, requires extra hardware, and assumes an auto locking belay.

I never did much lead climbing at all, so this is straying outside my lane.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 8:22:08 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Azygos:


You could always do a Münter hitch descent, but that still isn't optimal, requires extra hardware, and assumes an auto locking belay.

I never did much lead climbing at all, so this is straying outside my lane.
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it is quite precarious to downclimb to your last anchor (or free solo to the next bolt/placement), then unlock your biner, throw in a munter ,then rap off that single piece, (plus cleaning on the way)
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:08:36 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
it is quite precarious to downclimb to your last anchor (or free solo to the next bolt/placement), then unlock your biner, throw in a munter ,then rap off that single piece, (plus cleaning on the way)
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My partner and I got into a sketchy ass bail off of Petit Grepon one time in the middle of a lightning and hail storm.
That was a crazy enough rappel and we had plenty of gear (although we left some of it in place).
The thought of having to bail off the middle of a climb solo with little to no gear is a scary ass situation.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:35:27 PM EDT
30+ years of climbing - and I'm not saying you shouldn't - but I've never owned or worn a helmet.

Some call it Old School, others just call it Old Fool.....
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:43:04 PM EDT
Even if his head didn't split open from the fall, the impact probably fucked his brain.

EDIT:
he has eight broken vertebrae, an elbow injury, a handful of fractured ribs, and a traumatic brain injury
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Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:46:20 PM EDT
I was hauling a bag on the Elephants Perch that dislodged a flake that hit my partner in the head, breaking into two pieces on impact.

How I got down to him to render aid is beyond me.  Both ropes were fully weighted.  All I can recall is that my descent was not well controlled.

Blood everywhere, pupils two different sizes.  A mess.  Tough dude, though.  Put it behind him like a champ.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 9:56:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/25/2017 10:01:27 PM EDT by Azygos]
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Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:


it is quite precarious to downclimb to your last anchor (or free solo to the next bolt/placement), then unlock your biner, throw in a munter ,then rap off that single piece, (plus cleaning on the way)
View Quote
I hate downclimbing, and your point is well-taken. For that matter, my love of plain old sport abseils got curtailed by a botched overhang rappel on a first date. I made some foolish testosterone-fueled decisions that show up on X-rays 20 years after the fact.

With bolts, any runner requiring more than one grunted swear word for me to reach and clean would be abandonware in an emergency descent.

If going trad, I'd be inclined to leave any hard to remove pro up there instead of trying to clean it. It helps that I only have a tiny rack of a few hexes & nuts, don't climb any more, and therefore don't have to worry about leaving expensive Friends up there. Armchair quarterbacking is much easier this way, especially for a guy that could probably barely follow on a 5.8 or a 5.9-- nowadays.
Link Posted: 6/25/2017 10:00:25 PM EDT
Top fell off.

 
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