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Posted: 4/28/2014 2:38:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2014 2:39:01 PM EDT by pale_pony]
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The Music’s Over: Iconic Connecticut Ovation Guitar Factory Closes After 47 Years

NBCConnecticut.com

Ovation Guitars is closing its doors in New Hartford.

An Ovation guitar factory in the western Connecticut hills that has produced instruments for music legends from Paul Simon to Cat Stevens and Glen Campbell will be closing after 47 years.

The New Hartford factory's owner, Fender Musical Instruments Corp. of Scottsdale, Ariz., is ceasing U.S. production of Ovation guitars and notified employees on Tuesday that production at the factory will end by June. The news was first reported by the Republican-American of Waterbury.

"Fender Musical Instruments Corporation (FMIC) is proud of the products that are built in our New Hartford, Conn. manufacturing facility and appreciates the talented group of people that hand craft them. However, due to current market conditions and insufficient volume levels, the company has made the decision to cease production there within June 2014," the company said in a statement to NBC Connecticut.

The closing will affect 46 employees based in New Hartford, who will be given severance packages, outplacement services and other related assistance, according to the company.

The company said they are consolidating production of U.S.-made acoustic instruments.

“We are committed to providing the same high quality musical instruments our artists, consumers and customers expect and demand, and will continue to support the brands that are currently being produced in New Hartford,” Richard McDonald, senior vice president of Fender, said in a statement.

U.S. production of Fender acoustic and Guild instruments will move other facilities, while domestic production of U.S.-made Ovation musical instruments will cease.

Premier Guitar took a tour of the factory last summer. You can see it here.

Factory workers are calling it the end of an iconic American brand.

Ovation guitars were created by the late Charles Kaman, a helicopter engineer and founder of Bloomfield, Conn.-based aerospace company Kaman Corp. Fender bought Bloomfield-based Kaman Music Corp. in 2007.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:46:54 PM EDT
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:47:45 PM EDT
That sucks. I have 2 Ovation products, both broken. Guitar went flying out of my 4runner when I was trying to outrun some dogs on the way to play in a wedding (hard case didn't save it). Nephew knocked my ukulele off its wall hanger.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:48:12 PM EDT
It is an iconic guitar and it sucks to see another American factory close it's doors. I'm glad the employees will be taken care of.

Honestly, though, it doesn't surprise me at all. They're ugly ass guitars, uncomfortable to play, and sound awful unless you get into some of their higher end guitars. And even at that point, I think you'd be better off putting that money towards a Martin or a Taylor. Just my opinion.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:50:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2014 2:50:43 PM EDT by Cajun78]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pvc1984:
It is an iconic guitar and it sucks to see another American factory close it's doors. I'm glad the employees will be taken care of.

Honestly, though, it doesn't surprise me at all. They're ugly ass guitars, uncomfortable to play, and sound awful unless you get into some of their higher end guitars. And even at that point, I think you'd be better off putting that money towards a Martin or a Taylor. Just my opinion.

View Quote


I was not going to go there but I agree, the ones I have played event the high end ones were terrible.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:51:02 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jsteves:
That sucks. I have 2 Ovation products, both broken. Guitar went flying out of my 4runner when I was trying to outrun some dogs on the way to play in a wedding (hard case didn't save it). Nephew knocked my ukulele off its wall hanger.
View Quote


You should get ahold of them now if you want them fixed from the factory.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:52:10 PM EDT
It's very sad, but the writing was on the wall when Fender bought them.

Charles Kaman, who started the company was a great, great American. It's worth the time to look up his bio.

U.S. made Adamas guitars are (were) truly the pinnacle in guitar technology and art.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:54:30 PM EDT
My mother used to have an Ovation acoustic/electric 12 string. Man o man, she could play the hell outta that thing, and it sounded fantastic. Unfortunately, she had to sell it when her health took a turn for the worse.


R.I.P., Mom.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:54:57 PM EDT
To say nothing of foreign competition.

I received (did not buy) a Squier Tele, the low-end of the Fender brand. Not only that, but it was a value-line Squier - made in China!! I thought it would be crap. I have to concede it's as good as any of the other Squier line.

Yeah, free trade with the People's Republic of China was a great idea.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:56:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cajun78:


I was not going to go there but I agree, the ones I have played event the high end ones were terrible.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Originally Posted By pvc1984:
It is an iconic guitar and it sucks to see another American factory close it's doors. I'm glad the employees will be taken care of.

Honestly, though, it doesn't surprise me at all. They're ugly ass guitars, uncomfortable to play, and sound awful unless you get into some of their higher end guitars. And even at that point, I think you'd be better off putting that money towards a Martin or a Taylor. Just my opinion.



I was not going to go there but I agree, the ones I have played event the high end ones were terrible.


The thin ones aren't bad to play. Dad hated them because he had a belly and says "Round on round just don't work."

I have an elite standard 2, thin. I enjoy playing it. They really shine when they're plugged in, though. Yes, they never have the sound of a regular acoustic.

When I want that sound I will grab my Gibson 1963 Dove.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 2:56:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By pvc1984:
It is an iconic guitar and it sucks to see another American factory close it's doors. I'm glad the employees will be taken care of.

Honestly, though, it doesn't surprise me at all. They're ugly ass guitars, uncomfortable to play, and sound awful unless you get into some of their higher end guitars. And even at that point, I think you'd be better off putting that money towards a Martin or a Taylor. Just my opinion.

View Quote


I have high end Martin, Taylor, and Yairi guitars, and none of them come close to the volume, clarity, balance, and playability of my 30 -plus year old textured top Adamas models.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:00:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.
View Quote



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:04:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players WITH MONEY TO SPEND.
View Quote


FIFY.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:06:42 PM EDT
Plastic back guitars.


Never wanted one.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:07:04 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?


That would be next to impossible to answer.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:07:55 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:


That would be next to impossible to answer.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?


That would be next to impossible to answer.


Try?
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:08:18 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:


That would be next to impossible to answer.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?


That would be next to impossible to answer.


...unless he filled us in on what he wants to do with the new guitar...
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:08:19 PM EDT
See if you can find a local dealer that sells Eastman.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:09:38 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 2minkey:


...unless he filled us in on what he wants to do with the new guitar...
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 2minkey:
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?


That would be next to impossible to answer.


...unless he filled us in on what he wants to do with the new guitar...


Play blues and folk. Not for audience or recording, but for myself.

Though I might like to record to PC at some point.

Acoustic/electric is something I've been interested in but don't know alot about.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:14:53 PM EDT
Super sad news. I grew up with musician friends that swore by ovation acoustics and as a quality value oriented guitar

Also
As a signmaker, that sign is terrible.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:16:24 PM EDT
My wallet hates you arfcom, I haven't looked into buying a new guitar in years! Its going to feel funny spending $2k on something that doesn't come with a 6 month wait or a $200 tax stamp!
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:17:24 PM EDT
Sad.

But still, the second that curved back slipped away from me, I told myself I'd never buy one.

I guess I am part of the problem.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:19:34 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By steve2071:
Sad.

But still, the second that curved back slipped away from me, I told myself I'd never buy one.

I guess I am part of the problem.
View Quote

That's one of the problems I had. It's not a sit down and play guitar, it was designed with performance In mind.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:21:59 PM EDT
Heh, if some calamity befalls Gibson demand and I see a Les Paul studio new for under 800 or a Les Paul Standard new for under 1500, I'll buy one.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:23:14 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?



No you don't. The DR didn't come out until the mid 90's. I've got one, and love it for a road guitar. I've also got a DM and a D-28.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:23:34 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By steve2071:
Sad.

But still, the second that curved back slipped away from me, I told myself I'd never buy one.

I guess I am part of the problem.
View Quote


They are more difficult to hold in some positions, but act as a parabolic reflector. It was all about the sound. And Ovation really brought amplified acoustic sound to the world.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:25:19 PM EDT
Fender has a reputation for buying competitors and making them non-competitive. I think they do it deliberately.


It's ironic because I'd gladly own a USA made Hamer or USA made Jackson but there's hardly a guitar ever made that has the Fender name on it
that I'd actually buy even at a ridiculously low price.

I just don't like Fenders. I've tried them, several times, and there's no magic there. They're just mass-produced instruments made in factories
by people who make minimum wage or a few bucks an hour more than that. Employees, not artisans or craftsmen.


Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:25:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:


Play blues and folk. Not for audience or recording, but for myself.

Though I might like to record to PC at some point.

Acoustic/electric is something I've been interested in but don't know alot about.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By 2minkey:
Originally Posted By Ridgerunner9876:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?


That would be next to impossible to answer.


...unless he filled us in on what he wants to do with the new guitar...


Play blues and folk. Not for audience or recording, but for myself.

Though I might like to record to PC at some point.

Acoustic/electric is something I've been interested in but don't know alot about.

That Martin sounds like it's the tits.

I would buy a McPherson if I had the scratch. My middle of the road Taylor covers my needs since I typically beat the hell out of my guitars.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:27:35 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unreformed66:



No you don't. The DR didn't come out until the mid 90's. I've got one, and love it for a road guitar. I've also got a DM and a D-28.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unreformed66:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.



I've got a pretty nice rosewood and spruce Martin DR. Circa 1966 by the serial. Looks and sounds fantastic, tho.

What would you recommend for a second guitar, since we're getting into a great time to buy?



No you don't. The DR didn't come out until the mid 90's. I've got one, and love it for a road guitar. I've also got a DM and a D-28.


So when would a 210273 serial DR have been made? There was a little card that came in the case that had year and last# made. I assumed that was accurate for them all.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:27:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Fender has a reputation for buying competitors and making them non-competitive. I think they do it deliberately.


It's ironic because I'd gladly own a USA made Hamer or USA made Jackson but there's hardly a guitar ever made that has the Fender name on it
that I'd actually buy even at a ridiculously low price.

I just don't like Fenders. I've tried them, several times, and there's no magic there. They're just mass-produced instruments made in factories
by people who make minimum wage or a few bucks an hour more than that. Employees, not artisans or craftsmen.


View Quote

Yea they seemed to kill off Genz-Benz and SWR too last year now that you mention it.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:29:49 PM EDT


These guys were working with carbon fiber decades before anyone outside of aerospace R&D knew what it was. There will never be guitars built again that sound or play like these.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:30:59 PM EDT
So they're only going to make them in China now?
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:32:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Lieh-tzu:
To say nothing of foreign competition.

I received (did not buy) a Squier Tele, the low-end of the Fender brand. Not only that, but it was a value-line Squier - made in China!! I thought it would be crap. I have to concede it's as good as any of the other Squier line.

Yeah, free trade with the People's Republic of China was a great idea.
View Quote
I had a squire and upgraded to a Mexican Strat. At least changing the pickups helped it sound better. I never got good enough justify a good american strat.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:33:18 PM EDT
Meh...
I always thought they sounded like crap.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:37:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Butternut:
http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/littleredman888/Adamas_1687-8_563_11_zps1d18f414.jpg

These guys were working with carbon fiber decades before anyone outside of aerospace R&D knew what it was. There will never be guitars built again that sound or play like these.
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Rain Song guitars woop their ass.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:38:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Cajun78:
Not surprising the musical instrument market is flooded with instruments both mass produced and boutique. Too many guitars not enough players.
Guitar center can't move inventory and is hurting financially, but factories keep pumping out 100's of guitars a day no one wants.
Bubble is bursting and the only people benefitting are the people with extra cash to scoop up the guitars retailers are blowing out.
Used market is struggling due to stores dumping stock at a next to cost because another shipment is on the way of the latest and greatest.

Due to my frequent gigging and extra cash flow my collection has grown by three a year on average.
View Quote

That's the freaking truth.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:40:42 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Butternut:
http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/littleredman888/Adamas_1687-8_563_11_zps1d18f414.jpg

These guys were working with carbon fiber decades before anyone outside of aerospace R&D knew what it was. There will never be guitars built again that sound or play like these.
View Quote

Not true.

There are plenty of crappy guitars on the market today.

I don't care for Ovations. I don't find the roundback to be comfortable and don't care for the tone.

The necks are "meh" at best.

Give me a Gibson J-45 and my acoustic needs are satisfied.

Give me a Martin D-28 and I'll have no complaints.

Give me a Manzer and I'll be grinning from ear to ear and may actually practice more.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:41:35 PM EDT
THANKS OBAMA.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:44:44 PM EDT


And another timeless beauty, the Custom Legend.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:45:48 PM EDT
Never was impressed with Ovations. They were innovative but their sound or shape never suited me.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:45:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:

Not true.

There are plenty of crappy guitars on the market today.

I don't care for Ovations. I don't find the roundback to be comfortable and don't care for the tone.

The necks are "meh" at best.


Give me a Gibson J-45 and my acoustic needs are satisfied.

Give me a Martin D-28 and I'll have no complaints.

Give me a Manzer and I'll be grinning from ear to ear and may actually practice more.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Originally Posted By Butternut:
http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/littleredman888/Adamas_1687-8_563_11_zps1d18f414.jpg

These guys were working with carbon fiber decades before anyone outside of aerospace R&D knew what it was. There will never be guitars built again that sound or play like these.

Not true.

There are plenty of crappy guitars on the market today.

I don't care for Ovations. I don't find the roundback to be comfortable and don't care for the tone.

The necks are "meh" at best.


Give me a Gibson J-45 and my acoustic needs are satisfied.

Give me a Martin D-28 and I'll have no complaints.

Give me a Manzer and I'll be grinning from ear to ear and may actually practice more.



Sorry bud, I don't do internet fighting.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:47:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2014 3:49:33 PM EDT by Alembic]
I believe it was Fender that also ruined another lesser-known but amazing guitars when they bought Tacoma guitars.

Eta, Tacoma lesser known, not Ovation.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:51:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2014 3:55:13 PM EDT by Butternut]
And one more beauty worth posting in this sad memorial, a 1547 Elite. God bless Charles Kaman's soul, the once great company, and the good Americans that are going to lose jobs.

Link Posted: 4/28/2014 3:58:55 PM EDT


Never cared for them, but I hate to see any U.S. manufacturing location shut down.



Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:01:44 PM EDT
Sorry that they are ceasing production, I appreciate the vision of Their Creator, however;
Just never liked the 'TINNY" sound, and that it just would not sit IN my lap without a strap.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:06:15 PM EDT
My first job out of college was for Kaman Aerospace working on the SH2-G and the KMAX.

I remember one day he flew in to the plant practically hanging out of the door of an SH2... at 82 years of age.

Charlie was an interesting and stand up guy. His company(ies) are not what they were under his leadership.

RIP Charlie.



Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:10:57 PM EDT
Sounds like they're not going to stop making or selling Ovations, they're just gonna move production somewhere else.

I know the used market sucks because I have guitars to sell. The only ones people want used anymore are American made Gibsons, Martins, and Fenders. Boutique brands aren't selling.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:12:52 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Butternut:



Sorry bud, I don't do internet fighting.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Butternut:
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Originally Posted By Butternut:
http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae29/littleredman888/Adamas_1687-8_563_11_zps1d18f414.jpg

These guys were working with carbon fiber decades before anyone outside of aerospace R&D knew what it was. There will never be guitars built again that sound or play like these.

Not true.

There are plenty of crappy guitars on the market today.

I don't care for Ovations. I don't find the roundback to be comfortable and don't care for the tone.

The necks are "meh" at best.


Give me a Gibson J-45 and my acoustic needs are satisfied.

Give me a Martin D-28 and I'll have no complaints.

Give me a Manzer and I'll be grinning from ear to ear and may actually practice more.



Sorry bud, I don't do internet fighting.


I would guess you would be "arguing" with folks that have never set foot on a stage and needed the guitar in a floor wedge.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:14:49 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Rugerlvr:
Sounds like they're not going to stop making or selling Ovations, they're just gonna move production somewhere else.

I know the used market sucks because I have guitars to sell. The only ones people want used anymore are American made Gibsons, Martins, and Fenders. Boutique brands aren't selling.
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Boutique brands were always a crap-shoot. That said, if the stars align I would love to buy a Wal if they are what they say they are.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:21:22 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By tifosi:
My first job out of college was for Kaman Aerospace working on the SH2-G and the KMAX.

I remember one day he flew in to the plant practically hanging out of the door of an SH2... at 82 years of age.

Charlie was an interesting and stand up guy. His company(ies) are not what they were under his leadership.

RIP Charlie.

http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/OB-MG436_remem0_G_20110201210113.jpg

http://www.inc.com/uploaded_files/image/Legacy-120-Charles-Kaman-pop_7880.jpg
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You can say that again. When Charlie handed Kaman off to a the corporate guys the company totally changed. Your lucky you got to work there when he still ran the place. Won't ever be the same I hear.
Link Posted: 4/28/2014 4:31:26 PM EDT
never cared for their looks or sounds. call me if ESP goes tits up.
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