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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/11/2005 4:39:01 PM EDT

That video of that woman that was tackled by the California police officer, got me wondering. What law gives police officers from out of state or any other jurisdiction authority to do the policing they are doing in New Orleans? I'm sure there is one, but I don't know of it. Anybody know, so I don't go crazy thinking about this?

Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:44:14 PM EDT
Tag.

They were probably "deputized", or given temporary authority. Kind of like a posse in the old west
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:44:34 PM EDT
its given by the govenor.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:45:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Tag.

They were probably "deputized", or given temporary authority. Kind of like a posse in the old west



I figured it probably had to be something like that.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:54:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/11/2005 4:55:08 PM EDT by SgtWhiting]
It depends on the state they are in.

Here in California it is not the Governor but the State Attorney General.

Also here in California the Sheriff or Police Chief can "Deputize" or in the case of the Police "Special Officer".

For the Federal Government it is the US Marshal of the District.

I suspect it is the Louisiana Attorney General who is the chief LEO of LA.


Link Posted: 9/11/2005 4:55:34 PM EDT

So the way it goes, somebody in the state government waves a wand and they all become "deputies" of that state, or local jurisdiction. Ok, got it.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:09:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lippo:
So the way it goes, somebody in the state government waves a wand and they all become "deputies" of that state, or local jurisdiction. Ok, got it.



It is just the same for the Nat Guard. The Governor must ask the other states and not the Feds for their Guard units, if they want to have them perform a law enforcement activity.

This is legal because State Active Duty allows the NG to fall under Title 32 funding, which is exempt from the Posse Commitatus Act. Neat little loophole, because the Feds control that purse, too.
Link Posted: 9/11/2005 5:18:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lippo:
So the way it goes, somebody in the state government waves a wand and they all become "deputies" of that state, or local jurisdiction. Ok, got it.



The authority can also be granted by an interstate compact that has been passed by the state legislature in each state. Certain police officers have multiple state authority although they may be required to have specific training in each state they operate in.
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