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Posted: 11/3/2009 9:25:25 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 9:41:25 AM EST by chevcamo]
I've been thinking about seeing what all it would take to open a firing range seeing as the majority of the ones around here have either shut down or changed to LE and Military use only.
I would start small and gradually expand to larger and more ranges/lanes.
Does anyone know if there are any particular rule and regulations set for firing/shooting ranges like ATF does to an FFL?
My quick throwout of a fully developed plan when mostly finished would be several pistol, shotgun, smaller caliber long rifle, larger caliber long rifle, machine gun, and bow (might as well have a place for them too). I would have indoor and outdoor ranges. Might would see about having shoothouses (something like shown here M.A.T.C.H. Houses). Might set-up a designated area for paintball as my area doesn't have any places for that either.
It would be open to all legally eligable persons, including LE & Military. Silencers, AOW, SBS, and SBR would be allowed, also.
As the range developed, my rules and regulations would change to fit any additions added. As well as fees, operating hours, weapon rentals, ammo purchases, merchandise supporting range, and other things that would be appropriate. I would see about hosting gun competitions and other things of that nature.
All in all it would basically be one bad-ass firing range center where anything is legally possible.

So again, are there any special requirements, rules, or regulations that would have to be followed to a minimum similiar to an FFL?

Thanks for any info.
Chev
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:30:20 AM EST
Zoning and liability insurance will be the biggest expenses.

If self-funding it I'd want a few million in the bank just to deal with the local government bravo sierra involved with opening such a facility, though that's in WV. Stuff may be cheaper in MS.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:34:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By Bubbles:
Zoning and liability insurance will be the biggest expenses.

If self-funding it I'd want a few million in the bank just to deal with the local government bravo sierra involved with opening such a facility, though that's in WV. Stuff may be cheaper in MS.


It would most likely be self-funded, but I would only start small at first to get things rolling and take it from there.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:36:44 AM EST
Also, I just found this sourebook and might see about getting it. Seems like it would be a VERY well spent $60.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:37:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 9:45:51 AM EST by BT500]
I'm assuming this would be public and see moderate to heavy use? If so.......

To do an indoor range properly, it is extremely expensive and high maintainance.

Forget a rubber backstop, don't do it. Yes, they are cheaper but are a HUGE pain in the ass to maintain, not to mention they catch on fire and burn buildings down all the time. Plus they are 10x worse than steel in the hazardous material dept.

You will need a steel backstop, i'd go Savage or Action Target. Around $300,000 for 10 lanes (includes target carriers).

The HVAC is gonna cost an arm and a leg. A good unit will run $500,000 for 10-15 lanes, a great unit will run close to one million.

Don't forget you'll need a LOT of lights for an indoor range, that will run you at least $20,000 just for down range. Add another five grand for uprange.

And don't forget, putting people in a concrete box and shooting guns just isn't safe for the ears, especially if it's rifle (which of course it will be). Sound absorbing materials to cover the ceiling and walls will run you at least $5,000.

So basically a very good indoor range will run about $100,000 per lane for everything MINUS the building.


Outdoor would be MUCH cheaper up front but good luck finding somewhere that will approve zoning for it. Even if approved anyone living within five to ten miles of the range will bitch ENDLESSLY about the noise, stray rounds and lead. That causes big problems for outdoor ranges around here. Then there is always the EPA coming in and demanding you do a massive lead clean up of the soil that will put you out of business. Don't forget about lawsuits either........

If you can, try to buy a piece of land that is fairly well insulated by lots and lots of woods.

ETA - not trying to be a nay-sayer, but ranges are a LOT more expensive and a LOT more work to run properly than people realize.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:37:26 AM EST
Where in MS?
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:40:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By bags533:
Where in MS?


Outside Hattiesburg.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:42:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 9:42:48 AM EST by chevcamo]
Originally Posted By chevcamo:
Originally Posted By Bubbles:
Zoning and liability insurance will be the biggest expenses.

If self-funding it I'd want a few million in the bank just to deal with the local government bravo sierra involved with opening such a facility, though that's in WV. Stuff may be cheaper in MS.


It would most likely be self-funded, but I would only start small at first to get things rolling and take it from there.


I do know a handful of places that would help sponsor it, too. FTR
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:43:58 AM EST
find a suitable location and make sure zoning fits.

Then, contact a lawyer.

Then, contact a CPA.

Then, contact an insurance agent.

Then, set up your first year's budget.

Then, decide if you can afford to move forward.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:53:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By nissanfan84:
find a suitable location and make sure zoning fits.

Then, contact a lawyer.

Then, contact a CPA.

Then, contact an insurance agent.

Then, set up your first year's budget.

Then, decide if you can afford to move forward.


Looks like you've thought about doing a similar idea?
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:56:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 9:57:56 AM EST by Ameshawki]
The last new indoor range built in Iowa was about ten years ago. Bankrupted the first two owners. Third owner concentrated on the LE and security market and pretty much excluded the private market. Not sure its open any more. Haven't been past it in years.

Outdoor ranges aren't any better. Most in Iowa have been around for decades and usually operate as non-profits; Izaak Walton League being the most common umbrella organization. No matter where you locate, no matter how you build it, the neighbors will bitch. The zoning commission may or may not let you play. Our club has been in existence since 1950 and the county zoning board is constantly giving us grief. We are slowly getting surrounded by development. Its just a question of time before we are forced to move.

I don't know what Mississippi is like as far as rules and regs. I can't imagine starting a new range in Iowa from scratch. I wouldn't dream of it for less than a million in capital costs.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:05:14 AM EST
Hey I know you can be just like the ones in the DFW Metroplex.

No FMJ
One round a second Rule
Five round fudd Gun BS loading rules
No unscoped rifles except on the 35 yard range
No Offhand shooting
No prone Shooting
No black rifles,Maching guns or suppressors
And you can hire Hire incompetent Nazi Asshole Range Officers who brandish
thier sidearms at anyone who complains about sealing their brass.


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:06:56 AM EST
Call the NRA Range Developement. There is expertise and Money there.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:09:15 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:09:55 AM EST
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:11:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By airgun1:
Call the NRA Range Developement. There is expertise and Money there.


Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:14:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By airgun1:
Call the NRA Range Developement. There is expertise and Money there.


Is that the same place as NRA Headquarters? That's where I found the Sourcebook I mentioned above in a post.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 10:24:07 AM EST
Originally Posted By Tango7:
.Mil changed over a few years ago from steel and sand to granulated rubber.

While the fire hazard is greater*, the expended rounds ten to stay more intact, and thus are easier to cull out when the rubber is cleaned, unlike the whole of the sand, which, being contaminated with Pb is considered HazMat.

* consider a dry chemical extinguisher system - the heads can have armored collars placed around them (think of the @ sign - the closed portion would face the firing line, while the activation head sits safely nestled behind)




I was looking at the different bullet traps that Action Target offers and this is what is said about the particular one that is linked to "bullet traps".

Because fire is always a concern with any rubber trap, we treat our rubber with a special fire retardant substance to maximize safety. We also mix the fire retardant with a non-flammable adhesive and apply it to the rubber to further stabilize the berm and prevent migration. This patented process of combining the fire retardant with an adhesive helps it stick to the rubber so it can actually serve its purpose.
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