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Posted: 8/16/2013 3:10:56 PM EDT
How available is a QUALITY watch and where can I find one in the style that I am looking for?

Going price?
Pitfalls?
Brands?

Always loved those kinds of watches.
Never had one. Anyone on here collect those?
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:13:00 PM EDT
It's called a pocket watch.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:14:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hughjafj:
It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote


Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:14:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hughjafj:
It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote



Yep.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:15:23 PM EDT
you're saying you want a pocket watch with a stopwatch?
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:15:50 PM EDT
Maybe you can get a package deal with a fedora

But seriously, pawn shops often have them. The vast majority, I'm sure, are junk, though.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:19:45 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hughjafj:


It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote


Lol, I've had one since my Grandpa gave me one when I was around 8, 46 years ago.

Nothing fancy, just a Westclox Scotty.





 
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:21:22 PM EDT
Look through pawn shops and antique dealers.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:23:11 PM EDT
I've collected pocket watches for the last 30 years, starting when I was a teenager. They can vary in price from $50.00 to literally tens of thousands of dollars. That being said, you can buy a decent American made pocket watch for around $100.00 as long as you're not wanting railroad grade or a solid gold case or anything like that.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:23:52 PM EDT
Acutions !. Pop up here in Europe a lot and quite checp.

One comming up at Bonhams you might want to check out.

Bonhams

I you can take the time and you can at least follow the bidding live to get an idea for the market.



Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:24:14 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hughjafj:
It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote


Now I know! LOL!



Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:26:56 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
you're saying you want a pocket watch with a stopwatch?
View Quote


No. I want that "style" of a watch.

I think someone else has already corrected me in my terminology!

In all humility, I stand beaten down by GD and corrected.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:27:26 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Redarts:
Maybe you can get a package deal with a fedora

But seriously, pawn shops often have them. The vast majority, I'm sure, are junk, though.
View Quote


That is what I am trying to avoid.

Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:32:31 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unreformed66:
I've collected pocket watches for the last 30 years, starting when I was a teenager. They can vary in price from $50.00 to literally tens of thousands of dollars. That being said, you can buy a decent American made pocket watch for around $100.00 as long as you're not wanting railroad grade or a solid gold case or anything like that.
View Quote


Don`t know how many times in a movie I have seen an old conductor grab his " pocket watch " on a chain and look at it.

Do the railroad grade watches fetch a better price?  I am suspecting that they do now that this subject has been brought up.
I wouldn`t have to have a solid gold case but gold colored is what I would be after. I could accept gold plated. I know gold isn`t cheap and a solid gold case would fetch more, just for being gold, on the open market.

Ball park price for one?
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:32:59 PM EDT
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique?
How important is metal type and brand name to you?

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 3:54:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more
View Quote


What brands were reputable, back in the day?

Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:07:15 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Xringlover:


What brands were reputable, back in the day?

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more


What brands were reputable, back in the day?



Everyone has their favorites....just like cars, guns, etc.
Best bet is to just google antique pocket watches and see what strikes you as interesting.
I don't think you could go wrong with Patek Philippe, but I also don't know your budget
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:12:18 PM EDT
Hamilton and Elgin were some of the better pocket watches of the day, especially those made for use on the railroads. Back in the day railroad workers had to carry a certified pocket watch, and the watch had to be cleaned and inspected once (might have been twice) per year by a railroad authorized jeweler. The jeweler would give the worker a card to carry in his wallet with the inspection date and certification.



My Grandpa carried a large old Hamilton until the day he retired. Eventually the newer quartz movements came out and the railroad started allowing wrist watches, and ultimately new technology did away with the yearly inspection requirements.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:16:22 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Xringlover:


What brands were reputable, back in the day?

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more


What brands were reputable, back in the day?



In American watches anything by Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, Elgin, South Bend, Rockford or Hampden are OK. The quality ranged from 7 jewel less expensive movements to 21, 23, 24, and even 25 jewel movements. If you're looking for something to actually carry I'd recommend something more common, probably an Elgin or a Waltham due to the fact that parts are still pretty readily available for them if you drop them and break them. I wouldn't buy anything with less than 15 jewels if you're wanting it to keep decent time. You do need to realize that the finest railroad grade mechanical watch ever made won't keep time as well as a $10.00 quartz watch from Walmart. But then again I have watches that are over 100 years old that keep time to within a few minutes a week, and I don't expect those quartz watches to be around in 100 years. You can usually buy a 15 or 17 jewel Elgin or Waltham in a gold filled (that's gold plated) case for under $100. Be advised that since they are mechanical devices that they require service once in a while. They should be cleaned every 5 years or so if you plan for them to run correctly. Like I said before, I've collected them for over 30 years, and I've been doing repair work for the last 23 years. I don't have much for sale right now but once I'm done with my kitchen remodel (which may be never at the rate I'm going) I've got quite a few to fix up and sell. If you're interested drop me a PM.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:17:08 PM EDT
A modern take on a classic by Bell & Ross. You will not be disappointed by it.

http://www.bellross.com/us/collections/vintage/original/#/93/
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:20:28 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By yotehunter422:


A modern take on a classic by Bell & Ross. You will not be disappointed by it.



http://www.bellross.com/us/collections/vintage/original/#/93/
View Quote


DAMN. Nice, but those prices, DAMN



 
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:23:07 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By yotehunter422:
A modern take on a classic by Bell & Ross. You will not be disappointed by it.

http://www.bellross.com/us/collections/vintage/original/#/93/
View Quote

$3,000??????

no thanks!
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:26:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/16/2013 5:36:18 PM EDT by thebomber]
I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case". ETA I'm willing to sell it.

Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:33:01 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By thebomber:


I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case".



http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm77/hardgear/Watch/P1010468.jpg
View Quote


beautiful watch.



At the shop we got an Elgin in that was just a plain Jane case. It had military NSN and ASSY numbers on the back of the case. A bit of research showed that it was made for the US Air Corps in WW2. It was a 27 jewel top of the line railroad movement. It was used on aircraft to keep exact time so they could use the sexton( I believe that is correct) to shoot the stars for night navigation.



We sold it, but I sure wished I had kept it for myself. Like I said, plain, but a solid well built watch with an interesting history.



 
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:44:18 PM EDT
I have my Grandpaw's old Elgin, got it in 1967 when he passed away. I have had it ''cleaned'' twice since by a very reputable old German. Runs like a new one, I get it out every 10-15 years or so and use it for a few days. All the old timers carried them when I was a kid in their bib overhaul breast pocket.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:47:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By iggy1337:
Acutions !. Pop up here in Europe a lot and quite checp.

One comming up at Bonhams you might want to check out.

Bonhams

I you can take the time and you can at least follow the bidding live to get an idea for the market.

View Quote


NLD
English and spelling
Learn it
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:47:39 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By substandard:


At the shop we got an Elgin in that was just a plain Jane case. It had military NSN and ASSY numbers on the back of the case. A bit of research showed that it was made for the US Air Corps in WW2. It was a 27 jewel top of the line railroad movement. It was used on aircraft to keep exact time so they could use the sexton( I believe that is correct) to shoot the stars for night navigation.

We sold it, but I sure wished I had kept it for myself. Like I said, plain, but a solid well built watch with an interesting history.
 
View Quote


Sextant, not sexton but yes those are really cool.  I'd love to have one to go with my CDIA clock out of a Navy aircraft.

Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:51:17 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By thebomber:
I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case". ETA I'm willing to sell it.

<a href="http://s293.photobucket.com/user/hardgear/media/Watch/P1010468.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm77/hardgear/Watch/P1010468.jpg</a>
View Quote


I'll give you tree.fiddy.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 5:54:19 PM EDT
Xring, the range of choices is huge.

They were sold as a movement (the mechanism) and the case, in a kind of mix-n-match way.  So you can find a top grade movement in a simple case or a plainer movement in a fancy gold case.  Usually the nicer movements got a nicer case.

You really need to look around and see what kind of style works for you.  

A solid gold cased watch is likely to be very pricey-$700 and up.

You can find them at antique malls also.  But whatever you find will likely need to be cleaned and oiled even if it is running.  Don't buy one that doesn't run unless someone who knows what they are looking at can check it out first.

There are newer quartz pocket watches around also.  Those pretty much either work or they don't.

Link Posted: 8/16/2013 6:26:58 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By substandard:

beautiful watch.

At the shop we got an Elgin in that was just a plain Jane case. It had military NSN and ASSY numbers on the back of the case. A bit of research showed that it was made for the US Air Corps in WW2. It was a 27 jewel top of the line railroad movement. It was used on aircraft to keep exact time so they could use the sexton( I believe that is correct) to shoot the stars for night navigation.

We sold it, but I sure wished I had kept it for myself. Like I said, plain, but a solid well built watch with an interesting history.
 
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Originally Posted By substandard:
Originally Posted By thebomber:
I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case".

http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm77/hardgear/Watch/P1010468.jpg

beautiful watch.

At the shop we got an Elgin in that was just a plain Jane case. It had military NSN and ASSY numbers on the back of the case. A bit of research showed that it was made for the US Air Corps in WW2. It was a 27 jewel top of the line railroad movement. It was used on aircraft to keep exact time so they could use the sexton( I believe that is correct) to shoot the stars for night navigation.

We sold it, but I sure wished I had kept it for myself. Like I said, plain, but a solid well built watch with an interesting history.
 

Elgin never made a 27 jewel watch. They did however make a 22 jewel B.W.Raymond model with a 24 hour dial and a sweep seconds hand for military contracts. The movement was Elgin's 21 jewel B.W. Raymond railroad grade movement with the extra jewel added for the sweep seconds function. They were indeed navigation watches for aircraft navigators. Most of the navigation watches you see are the Hamilton 4992B, the Elgin is less common and more desireable.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 6:47:01 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unreformed66:





Elgin never made a 27 jewel watch. They did however make a 22 jewel B.W.Raymond model with a 24 hour dial and a sweep seconds hand for military contracts. The movement was Elgin's 21 jewel B.W. Raymond railroad grade movement with the extra jewel added for the sweep seconds function. They were indeed navigation watches for aircraft navigators. Most of the navigation watches you see are the Hamilton 4992B, the Elgin is less common and more desireable.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By unreformed66:



Originally Posted By substandard:


Originally Posted By thebomber:

I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case".



http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm77/hardgear/Watch/P1010468.jpg


beautiful watch.



At the shop we got an Elgin in that was just a plain Jane case. It had military NSN and ASSY numbers on the back of the case. A bit of research showed that it was made for the US Air Corps in WW2. It was a 27 jewel top of the line railroad movement. It was used on aircraft to keep exact time so they could use the sexton( I believe that is correct) to shoot the stars for night navigation.



We sold it, but I sure wished I had kept it for myself. Like I said, plain, but a solid well built watch with an interesting history.

 


Elgin never made a 27 jewel watch. They did however make a 22 jewel B.W.Raymond model with a 24 hour dial and a sweep seconds hand for military contracts. The movement was Elgin's 21 jewel B.W. Raymond railroad grade movement with the extra jewel added for the sweep seconds function. They were indeed navigation watches for aircraft navigators. Most of the navigation watches you see are the Hamilton 4992B, the Elgin is less common and more desireable.




Yes you are correct. When I was researching it on the net, it was mentioned that it was the "railroad grade movement". If I recall correctly the movement was marked 21 jewel, but like you said it had an extra jewel.





 
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 6:52:44 PM EDT
Hamilton Railway Special with the 992b movement.


Link Posted: 8/16/2013 7:00:53 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By macro:


Everyone has their favorites....just like cars, guns, etc.
Best bet is to just google antique pocket watches and see what strikes you as interesting.
I don't think you could go wrong with Patek Philippe, but I also don't know your budget
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Originally Posted By macro:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more


What brands were reputable, back in the day?



Everyone has their favorites....just like cars, guns, etc.
Best bet is to just google antique pocket watches and see what strikes you as interesting.
I don't think you could go wrong with Patek Philippe, but I also don't know your budget


American Waltham is a good basic pocket watch. They also made the more expensive "regulated" railroad timepieces too. I have a basic 1894 18s case model.
Link Posted: 8/16/2013 7:02:09 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By hughjafj:


It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote
That's what I was gonna say.

 



Damn first post
Link Posted: 8/17/2013 3:10:45 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By cpermd:


NLD
English and spelling
Learn it
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Originally Posted By cpermd:
Originally Posted By iggy1337:
Auctions !. Pop up here in Europe a lot and quite cheap.

One coming up at Bonhams you might want to check out.

Bonhams

I you can take the time and you can at least follow the bidding live to get an idea for the market.



NLD
English and spelling
Learn it


On the other hand I'm pretty good at reading cursive. Bet I can go toe to toe with a quite large part of your countries population if I tried


Link Posted: 8/17/2013 3:18:00 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By hughjafj:
It's called a pocket watch.
View Quote


or Onion in some places
Link Posted: 8/17/2013 3:34:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2013 3:34:45 AM EDT by PugglePod9000]
I picked up an EPOS skeletonized pocket watch from an estate sale years ago ($135)

They can be had new for under a grand easilly, and they are nice.

The one I have is not the same, but similar to this:

Link Posted: 8/17/2013 7:38:29 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By Abakan:
or Onion in some places
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Originally Posted By Abakan:



Originally Posted By hughjafj:

It's called a pocket watch.




or Onion in some places


I always heard them called Turnips by railroaders.



 
Link Posted: 8/17/2013 7:51:52 AM EDT
You can shoot craps and buy an old Tiffany. They branded the watches, but did not make them. Some are Longines, worth a few $1,000. If you hit the lottery, there are Patek-Philippe movement Tiffany watches that are worth over $20,000. Most pawn shops can recognize the value from the quality of the face, etc., but there are some incredibly stupid people in that business.
Link Posted: 8/17/2013 8:00:54 AM EDT
I picked up a modern-ish pocket watch when I was in high school.  Stuck out for a while with it, then the wallets with chains came into style and it ended up looking like I was carrying a wallet.

Funny how modern jeans still have a pocket for a pocket watch.
Link Posted: 8/20/2013 6:10:29 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By substandard:
Hamilton and Elgin were some of the better pocket watches of the day, especially those made for use on the railroads. Back in the day railroad workers had to carry a certified pocket watch, and the watch had to be cleaned and inspected once (might have been twice) per year by a railroad authorized jeweler. The jeweler would give the worker a card to carry in his wallet with the inspection date and certification.

My Grandpa carried a large old Hamilton until the day he retired. Eventually the newer quartz movements came out and the railroad started allowing wrist watches, and ultimately new technology did away with the yearly inspection requirements.
View Quote



The Hamilton and Elgin name surprises me.

I thought they were names of companies that had been around "recently".

I had no idea that those companies had been around so long.

Link Posted: 8/20/2013 6:25:28 PM EDT
A hardy thanks to all who participated in this post!

A lot of good info to absorb!
Link Posted: 8/22/2013 1:30:47 AM EDT
Yeah, thanks OP... you got me wanting to spend more money!!

I'd love to have a nice mechanical pocketwatch, and think it would be hella cool to have one that was made before 1900. We'll see, maybe our resident watch man will be able to hook me up. I've already PMed him. I'd be happy to throw a little business at another ARFCOMmer.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 10:41:34 AM EDT
I just bought my first pocket watch and love it. I bought it from http://pocketwatchcheap.com Prices range from as low as $19 to as much as a few thousand. I ended up getting a modern looking silver watch with a blue face plate for $35. Looks and functions great. I've always hated things on my wrist anyway.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:31:43 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By macro:


Everyone has their favorites....just like cars, guns, etc.
Best bet is to just google antique pocket watches and see what strikes you as interesting.
I don't think you could go wrong with Patek Philippe, but I also don't know your budget
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Originally Posted By macro:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more


What brands were reputable, back in the day?



Everyone has their favorites....just like cars, guns, etc.
Best bet is to just google antique pocket watches and see what strikes you as interesting.
I don't think you could go wrong with Patek Philippe, but I also don't know your budget


Thanks Macro!
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:35:26 PM EDT
I own an antique pocket watch.



Buy vintage.  Spend more than $1,000 - or leave them alone.  And be prepared to sink a huge amount into a REAL gold chain - not some plated POS chain from cheapville.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:39:33 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By unreformed66:


In American watches anything by Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, Elgin, South Bend, Rockford or Hampden are OK. The quality ranged from 7 jewel less expensive movements to 21, 23, 24, and even 25 jewel movements. If you're looking for something to actually carry I'd recommend something more common, probably an Elgin or a Waltham due to the fact that parts are still pretty readily available for them if you drop them and break them. I wouldn't buy anything with less than 15 jewels if you're wanting it to keep decent time. You do need to realize that the finest railroad grade mechanical watch ever made won't keep time as well as a $10.00 quartz watch from Walmart. But then again I have watches that are over 100 years old that keep time to within a few minutes a week, and I don't expect those quartz watches to be around in 100 years. You can usually buy a 15 or 17 jewel Elgin or Waltham in a gold filled (that's gold plated) case for under $100. Be advised that since they are mechanical devices that they require service once in a while. They should be cleaned every 5 years or so if you plan for them to run correctly. Like I said before, I've collected them for over 30 years, and I've been doing repair work for the last 23 years. I don't have much for sale right now but once I'm done with my kitchen remodel (which may be never at the rate I'm going) I've got quite a few to fix up and sell. If you're interested drop me a PM.
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Originally Posted By unreformed66:
Originally Posted By Xringlover:
Originally Posted By macro:
Are you looking for a modern watch in that style, or a true antique? I wouldn`t mind getting one at the right price if it is out there.
How important is metal type and brand name to you? Like I said before, I know that solid gold will be more expensive. I could live with plating instead.

There are countless old pocket watches on the antique market.
A good, reputable pawn broker would have a decent selection.  Pawn brokers are notorious for overly inflated prices but as you stated, "good, reputable pawn broker" would be invaluable for what I am looking for.

You can get a modern, nothing fancy watch for under $100.
If you want 19th century, 18k gold, Tiffany product with a European movement..it's gonna be a bit more


What brands were reputable, back in the day?



In American watches anything by Hamilton, Illinois, Waltham, Elgin, South Bend, Rockford or Hampden are OK. The quality ranged from 7 jewel less expensive movements to 21, 23, 24, and even 25 jewel movements. If you're looking for something to actually carry I'd recommend something more common, probably an Elgin or a Waltham due to the fact that parts are still pretty readily available for them if you drop them and break them. I wouldn't buy anything with less than 15 jewels if you're wanting it to keep decent time. You do need to realize that the finest railroad grade mechanical watch ever made won't keep time as well as a $10.00 quartz watch from Walmart. But then again I have watches that are over 100 years old that keep time to within a few minutes a week, and I don't expect those quartz watches to be around in 100 years. You can usually buy a 15 or 17 jewel Elgin or Waltham in a gold filled (that's gold plated) case for under $100. Be advised that since they are mechanical devices that they require service once in a while. They should be cleaned every 5 years or so if you plan for them to run correctly. Like I said before, I've collected them for over 30 years, and I've been doing repair work for the last 23 years. I don't have much for sale right now but once I'm done with my kitchen remodel (which may be never at the rate I'm going) I've got quite a few to fix up and sell. If you're interested drop me a PM.


Sounds like it to me that you know your field thoroughly.

I would have never known about the jewel movements if you hadn`t posted.
I would have never known about the service requirements either.

Thank you for the help!



Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:40:46 PM EDT
I have my great grandfather's railroad watch.
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:41:22 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By thebomber:
I have an awesome one that has Jewlers marks from 1917. It's in perfect condition and has a solid gold "Hunter's Case". ETA I'm willing to sell it.

<a href="http://s293.photobucket.com/user/hardgear/media/Watch/P1010468.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm77/hardgear/Watch/P1010468.jpg</a>
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Wow!

Nice looking watch!

Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:43:03 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By LePew:
Xring, the range of choices is huge.

They were sold as a movement (the mechanism) and the case, in a kind of mix-n-match way.  So you can find a top grade movement in a simple case or a plainer movement in a fancy gold case.  Usually the nicer movements got a nicer case.

You really need to look around and see what kind of style works for you.  

A solid gold cased watch is likely to be very pricey-$700 and up.

You can find them at antique malls also.  But whatever you find will likely need to be cleaned and oiled even if it is running.  Don't buy one that doesn't run unless someone who knows what they are looking at can check it out first.

There are newer quartz pocket watches around also.  Those pretty much either work or they don't.

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Thanks Lepew!
Link Posted: 9/11/2013 5:53:22 PM EDT
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Nice looking watch photo that you posted!

Looks very clean!
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