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Posted: 4/12/2017 11:33:40 PM EDT
OK..code around here is 5/8 firecode drywall for garage walls. Easy..got most of it hung, ready to tape.

Want to make a removable panel so that there is access to plumbing.

Can I make it out of 5/8's and a like a 1x3 frame and use the frame to wood screw it in? Or can I NOT have a break in the drywall? Can I use 5/8 plywood?

The framed or ply area would be like 2'x3'.
Link Posted: 4/12/2017 11:44:16 PM EDT
Why not a 24x36 induction frame and air filter cover?
Link Posted: 4/13/2017 7:40:18 PM EDT
Quoted:
OK..code around here is 5/8 firecode drywall for garage walls. Easy..got most of it hung, ready to tape.

Want to make a removable panel so that there is access to plumbing.

Can I make it out of 5/8's and a like a 1x3 frame and use the frame to wood screw it in? Or can I NOT have a break in the drywall? Can I use 5/8 plywood?

The framed or ply area would be like 2'x3'.
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Time for a talk with the AHJ.

Ask them what they want to see.

I would bet some time of metal cover.

A typical plumbing access panel is not all that tight for gasses (like CO from cars in the garage) nor all that flame resistant.

Steel holding a drywall panel might satisfy if you also made sure intumescent caulk might get a pass.

The big problem is finding an example that has been tested for AHJ review.


Doing 'one offs' gets expensive and a PITA real fast.


Learning how to open and close drywall might be easier in the long run than trying to get an approved method to satisfy the AHJ.

I would not put a PE seal on something like that without a bunch of testing.
Link Posted: 4/13/2017 8:01:55 PM EDT
You may have to box out the inside with drywall.  Much like you would do with can lights.

Ask your inspector/building department.
Link Posted: 4/13/2017 8:47:33 PM EDT
No matter what aswer/solution you finally use take a LOT of pictures before closing up the wall.

While terairng into a stud bay may seem daunting if you know WHAT bay to tear into it gets a lot easier.

Keep pipes far enough away from studs when they run vertically to add another layer of 2x lumber to the side of the stud.

Ifg it is crowded you can get away with 3.4 but hitting 1.5 is a lot easier.

Whwn I have to update an older house power and plumbing system I find the most convenient stud bay and clear it stud to stud.

Add sisters to the edges of the opening on the old studs.
keep the work in that bay.

It is very quick to cut new panels, astern them to the sisters (isn't a 1.5 inch target easier to hit thatn a 3/4 inch target?) and fix the joint.

If you have tall baseboards you can use 48 inches on the wall.

If things get stretched out put the gap in the middle of the wall.

Standing and finishing a pair of joints 4 feet off the floor beats the hell out of crawling around on the floor or wearing stilts to finish out a ceiling gap.

In any number of older houses I have dedicated a chase to plumbing and electrical.

A new sub-panel on the second floor can save a lot of wire.
Some examination of plumbing can do the same thing.

A few feet of 1 or 1-1/4 water line to a common point on the seconds floor can clean up a lot of 'defects' in an old system.



Compromise on the best location.
Link Posted: 4/13/2017 9:10:39 PM EDT
Buy a fire rated access panel.

For instance

Link Posted: 4/18/2017 3:34:42 PM EDT
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Learning how to repair drywall will be a lot less expensive.

That is a $139 panel.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:01:40 PM EDT
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Quoted:


Learning how to repair drywall will be a lot less expensive.

That is a $139 panel.
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Yeah, that is the route I am going..Just took pic's, printed and measured and will keep them on file in the house file. Easy enough. The PEX is good to, been running electrical and plumbing for a bit now, no issues..just gonna cover it all.

Drywall easy.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 4:10:31 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Yeah, that is the route I am going..Just took pic's, printed and measured and will keep them on file in the house file. Easy enough. The PEX is good to, been running electrical and plumbing for a bit now, no issues..just gonna cover it all.

Drywall easy.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:


Learning how to repair drywall will be a lot less expensive.

That is a $139 panel.
Yeah, that is the route I am going..Just took pic's, printed and measured and will keep them on file in the house file. Easy enough. The PEX is good to, been running electrical and plumbing for a bit now, no issues..just gonna cover it all.

Drywall easy.
Print the pictures.

It beats not being able to view them or print them when SW gets changed.
Link Posted: 4/19/2017 4:23:39 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Print the pictures.

It beats not being able to view them or print them when SW gets changed.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:


Learning how to repair drywall will be a lot less expensive.

That is a $139 panel.
Yeah, that is the route I am going..Just took pic's, printed and measured and will keep them on file in the house file. Easy enough. The PEX is good to, been running electrical and plumbing for a bit now, no issues..just gonna cover it all.

Drywall easy.
Print the pictures.

It beats not being able to view them or print them when SW gets changed.
Learn how to work qwith setting compound and meash tape.

Once you are even a little skilled you can use 20 minute compound and apply multiple coats in a single day.

Setting compounds harden by chemical reaction and not drying.

As soon as  a layer is set you can put another layer on.

If you use Easy-sand you can still sand if you need to.  It is dry sanding though.

Best to practice making smooth surfaces that do not require sanding.  Steel trowels from the concrete finishing section work better

than 'drywall knives' at leaving smoother surfaces and covering large areas faster.

In an unfinished location sanding is annoying.

In a finished & furnished living space the dust is a real PITA.   Better to not need to make any.

Another coat beats sanding.
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