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Posted: 6/15/2007 1:19:57 PM EDT


Drug raid nabs wrong woman
Officers try to arrest 77-year-old; intended target was next door

June 15, 2007
By Shane Benjamin | Herald Staff Writer


Virginia Herrick sits in her Durango West I home on Thursday. She is sitting in the same chair where she first saw men wearing gas masks outside the window on her right June 8. The men, agents of the Southwest Drug Task Force, moments later barged into her home, ordered her to the floor and put handcuffs on her.Virginia Herrick stands in front of the spot in her home where she was ordered to lie on the floor when law-enforcement officers mistakenly raided her house June 8. The officers intended to raid a house next door to Herrick’s..

The raid occurred about 11 a.m. June 8, as Virginia Herrick was settling in to watch "The Price is Right." She heard a rustling outside her mobile home in Durango West I and looked out to see several men with gas masks and bulletproof vests, she said.

Herrick went to the back door to have a look.

"I thought there was a gas leak or something," she said.

But before reaching the door, La Plata County Sheriff's deputies shouted "search warrant, search warrant" and barged in with guns drawn, she said. They ordered Herrick to the ground and began searching the home.

"They didn't give me a chance to ask for a search warrant or see a search warrant or anything," she said in a phone interview Thursday. "I'm not about to argue with those big old guys, especially when they've got guns and those big old sledgehammers."

La Plata County Sheriff Duke Schirard and Southwest Drug Task Force Director Lt. Rick Brown confirmed Herrick's story.

Some deputies stayed with Herrick as others searched the house. They entered every bedroom and overturned a mattress in her son's room.

Deputies asked Herrick if she knew a certain man, and she said no. Then they asked what address they were at, and she told them 74 Hidden Lane.

Deputies intended to raid 82 Hidden Lane - the house next door.


While Herrick was on the ground, deputies began placing handcuffs on her. They cuffed one wrist and were preparing to cuff the other.

"I had gotten really angry, and I was shaking from the whole incident," she said.

Once deputies realized their mistake, they tried to help Herrick stand up and help her clean up the mess they created.

"I'm kind of a little stiff getting up," she said.

But Herrick wanted the deputies out.

"Not too much later, the sheriff came up and apologized, and apologized and apologized," she said.

Schirard and Brown provided context for how the mistake occurred, and said that they ultimately busted the correct house and captured $51,520 worth of meth.

For one month, the Southwest Drug Task Force had been investigating drug activity at 82 Hidden Lane, and investigators made several undercover meth purchases from a man who lived at the house. Brown declined to release the man's name, citing an ongoing investigation.

On June 8, the task force decided to end the undercover operation and arrest the man. Rather than arrest him inside his home, investigators set up a drug deal to lure him outside.

As the suspect drove toward the meeting location at the entrance of Durango West I, a deputy attempted to pull him over as if it were a routine traffic stop.

But the suspect hit the gas and led deputies on a 57-second chase through the Durango West neighborhood. The chase covered four-tenths of a mile with speeds reaching 45 mph. While driving, the suspect threw bags of meth out of the car and erased phone numbers from his cell phone, Brown said.

The suspect eventually crashed into a power box and was arrested without incident.

While task-force members were detaining him, other law-enforcement-officials were ordered to execute a search warrant at 82 Hidden Lane.

After raiding the wrong house, deputies regrouped and decided to enter the correct house. That raid was successful: Two people were arrested and 7.2 ounces of meth was seized, Brown said.

In all, the task force seized a total of 2.3 pounds of meth during the investigation, he said. That includes the meth investigators bought while undercover and the meth the suspect threw from his car during the chase, Brown said. The street value for 1 ounce of meth is $1,400.

"They were slinging a lot of dope in this community," Brown said. "We took a lot of meth off the streets."

Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid.

Agencies involved in the raid included the task force and the La Plata County Sheriff's Office SWAT team.

Herrick's home and the one next door had similar qualities, Brown said, and it didn't help that deputies were entering through the back.

In the future, Brown said agents familiar with a particular raid will physically point deputies to the home, and pictures of the home will be distributed to those involved.

Herrick's son, David Herrick, said investigators surveilled the neighbor's house before the raid, and it was extremely unprofessional to enter the wrong house.

"There is a big difference between 74 and 82," he said, referring to the house numbers.

What's more, Herrick doesn't understand why his 77-year-old mother was handcuffed.

"Why they thought it was necessary to handcuff her and put her on the floor I don't know," he said. "And then they had to ask her what the address was."

Brown said it is common practice to make all occupants lie on the ground handcuffed in case gunfire erupts.

"It's just safe for everybody if they're controlled on the ground," he said.

David Herrick said he has contacted lawyers about a possible lawsuit.

"It's pretty upsetting that they do that to a 77-year-old," he said. "A little common sense, I think, would have helped out on the problem a lot."

Virginia Herrick said she is glad her meth-dealing neighbors are gone, but also said: "I'm still angry at the whole situation. For them to raid the wrong trailer was not very smart."




At least in my neck of the woods, the sherrif will apologize when they screw up!

I find it funny that they made several undercover buys at the house they wanted to raid, then accidently raid the house next door!
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:22:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:29:49 PM EDT
dumbasses
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:31:55 PM EDT
That's why you take the UC with you on the raid. Proper planning to include photos of the house to be hit. etc.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:32:16 PM EDT
JBT"s at their donut eating best again.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:32:18 PM EDT
Can't they just knock like a polite person?

-Foxxz
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:34:49 PM EDT
Pay carefull attention here:

"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."

No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:35:16 PM EDT
Just bashing down the doors of little old ladies that the rest of Americans don't want to bash down.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:39:27 PM EDT
Is her dog ok?



somebody had to ask...
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:40:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:42:36 PM EDT
height=8
Originally Posted By vrwc0915:
Pay carefull attention here:

"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."

No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is


OK how many other little old ladies did they scare the crap out of?
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:42:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vrwc0915:
Pay carefull attention here:

"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."

No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is


You noticed that too? Not one word about possibly getting an innocent person injured or killed? It's only how it affects the Officers, not the peasants.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:42:51 PM EDT
1: Cops drive to the pizza joint nearest 82 Hidden Lane .

2: Cops call pizza joint and order a pizza for 82 Hidden Lane.

3: Cops follow delivery boy.

4: Cops follow to the front door, pay for pizza, knock down door.

5: Cops eat pizza as they discuss the operation.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:43:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vrwc0915:
Pay carefull attention here:

"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."

No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is


+1, Brown SHOULD have apologised and STFU about his officers safety as it was untimately HIS responsibility and judgement that was suspect. It's just not that damn hard to get the right address if someone has been there multiple time. And that someone SHOULD have gone on the raid with the team.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:44:35 PM EDT
Is everyone in that town a tard? Cops bust in the wrong door after buying drugs from the one they were investigating, guy leads cops on a 4/10 of a mile chase? WTF?...this just sounds like an episode of Reno911.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:45:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vrwc0915:
Pay carefull attention here:


"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."


No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is


That's exactly what I was going to point out
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:46:17 PM EDT
This is a really rare occurence, I don't know what you guys are all riled up about...

Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:48:12 PM EDT
This is why I always hire a private process server...
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:48:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pnkssbtz:
This is a really rare occurence, I don't know what you guys are all riled up about...



Well as long as its rare, I guess were ok then.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:51:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By geeze:
Well as long as its rare, I guess were ok then.


Sorry, i should of added a smiley to convey my sarcasm better... I thought the link would be sufficient =P
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:53:09 PM EDT
There's zero point fucking zero accountability in government why should the police be any different?

At least the sherrif was a man and apologized to the lady instead of hiding behind his desk and attorneys like a pussy.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:55:44 PM EDT
Heck, at least they hung around and helped her clean up the mess, and the Sheriff came and personally apolgized. Most of the time the team just splits and you get a form apology letter in the mail.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 1:56:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2007 2:00:35 PM EDT by BURN]
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:02:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BURN:
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...


Ya know, stuff like this makes my little heart glad. See a problem, find a solution, implement it and all sides [but the dopers] are happy. Cool.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:10:34 PM EDT
That happened in the county i live in, not only did they hit the wrong residence, a reserve deputy was running in, stumbled on the bottom door facing of the trailor house doorway discharging his pistol, 99.9% sure it was a .40 Caliber Glock.
Its been about 8 -9yrs and i cant remember the details too good but im almost positive on that.
The single bullet that was fired went into the end of a couch striking a young woman who was asleep in the top of the head killing her instantly.
Her live in boyfriend who owned the residence was awarded 6 Million Dollars in damages.
The deputy was facing charges of some kind, but im not sure what ever came of it.
All one big clusterfuck
Some of the LEO's out there may have heard about this, it made national news.

Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:12:08 PM EDT
TAG
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:14:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BURN:
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...


Nice first all the boring investigation,verification,and attention to detail stuff.

And then all the exciting kicking doors and slapping whores.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:15:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:17:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BURN:
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...


That's fantastic. You ought to write up the procedures and circulate them nationally among LEO and D.E. groups. Really smart approach. If there's still going to be so much dynamic entry, its VERY good to have a system of checks and balances like this.

Right on.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:24:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BURN:
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...


that is great to hear man, BZ to you for getting that implemented in your department

Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:25:59 PM EDT
Very sad occurrence.

For those that have not served warrants, you might be surprised at how many homes do not display an address. This was a trailer park, and it is very common for there not to be addresses at trailer parks.

That is why the search warrants we served, even way back in the day, included a very specific description of the home.....color of the paint, color of the roof, description of the type of structure, etc. Photos were taken, if possible to assure we had the correct home. If an informant was used, he was required to verify the correct address.

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:27:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2007 2:34:59 PM EDT by BURN]

Originally Posted By Jarhead_22:

Originally Posted By BURN:
My department has three things to do before we enter a house.....M/O(Marksmen/Observer) team on pre recon verifies address, Lt on shift verifies address, team leader verifies address......then they get to go in......if the three don't all verify the address no one goes in no one......if departments would implement a check system like this....it would stop a lot of these wrong address bull shit.....and if its a warrant raid they also have to verify the house with the Investigator and the LT together....on top of the other two verifying....

but I want to say this was implemented into our SOP thanks to ARFCOM...I approached our S.R.T. commander and made the suggestion...he thought it was a great idea...so hats off to you guys here on bringing this PROBLEM to my attention a few years ago...

That's outstanding. BRAVO ZULU to you!

The only thing better than that would be, as Bama said, if the undercover who made the buys was required to confirm to the warrant squad/SWAT team that they had the right house.


I work on a military base as a civilian not many drug raids taking place.....but I am also a reserve on the local sheriff's dept I am trying to get them to do the same thing....I guess only time will tell


ETA: in the off chance we do serve a drug warrant...as I stated before no the UC has to go with the LT....to ensure the address
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 2:31:12 PM EDT


Virginia Herrick
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:09:53 PM EDT
so, who pays for the repairs to the old lady's home?

what happens when they crash a house and person opens fire cause it's a "home invasion"....and a cop gets killed?

No Expert
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:14:20 PM EDT











Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:23:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By callgood:
1: Cops drive to the pizza joint nearest 82 Hidden Lane .

2: Cops call pizza joint and order a pizza for 82 Hidden Lane.

3: Cops follow delivery boy.

4: Cops follow to the front door, pay for pizza, knock down door.

5: Cops eat pizza as they discuss the operation.


Brilliant!
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:30:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
Very sad occurrence.

For those that have not served warrants, you might be surprised at how many homes do not display an address. This was a trailer park, and it is very common for there not to be addresses at trailer parks.

That is why the search warrants we served, even way back in the day, included a very specific description of the home.....color of the paint, color of the roof, description of the type of structure, etc. Photos were taken, if possible to assure we had the correct home. If an informant was used, he was required to verify the correct address.

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.



It can but trailer parks can be impossible...

I have been working a case on some mexicans that live in a trailer park where you lease the trailer from one owner who owns most of the trailers in the park. None of the streets in the park have a name. Maybe one in ten of the trailers have any sort of number on them. There is a central mailbox...but no names on anything, just A, B, C, D, etc. The mailman has no idea who lives where.

Just to make it fun, the residents all use false ID with stolen SSNs, names, etc so you can never really know who is who until you have them in custody and can print them and compare that to the ICE records.

Tons of people standing around all day makes it right at impossible to drive around and look without being spotted.

We are somewhat using Google Earth but even that has serious flaws because the streets aren't named.

People forget...criminals go out of their way not to be found and that includes things like car tags, house #s, etc.



Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:35:41 PM EDT
Hows about they take some of the seized money and buy a GPS? Hell buy two or three! I recommend the Garmin line. They also need to get a number line so they can tell an 8 from a 7
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:46:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FedDC:

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
Very sad occurrence.

For those that have not served warrants, you might be surprised at how many homes do not display an address. This was a trailer park, and it is very common for there not to be addresses at trailer parks.

That is why the search warrants we served, even way back in the day, included a very specific description of the home.....color of the paint, color of the roof, description of the type of structure, etc. Photos were taken, if possible to assure we had the correct home. If an informant was used, he was required to verify the correct address.

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.



It can but trailer parks can be impossible...

I have been working a case on some mexicans that live in a trailer park where you lease the trailer from one owner who owns most of the trailers in the park. None of the streets in the park have a name. Maybe one in ten of the trailers have any sort of number on them. There is a central mailbox...but no names on anything, just A, B, C, D, etc. The mailman has no idea who lives where.

Just to make it fun, the residents all use false ID with stolen SSNs, names, etc so you can never really know who is who until you have them in custody and can print them and compare that to the ICE records.

Tons of people standing around all day makes it right at impossible to drive around and look without being spotted.

We are somewhat using Google Earth but even that has serious flaws because the streets aren't named.

People forget...criminals go out of their way not to be found and that includes things like car tags, house #s, etc.





In this particular context it's completely is understandable. 1st question that popped into my mind when I read this was, "How can anyone's address be distinguished in a trailer park?" I know tailers can be numbered, but depending on the particular park, it's not always going to be 100%. Where homes are concerned, however, I find wrong-address raids hard to accept. In many instances, such can be chopped up to brazen stupidity. I also do NOT like the cavalier, we-didn't-do-anything-wrong attitude some officers have protrayed in reported botched raids where innocent people have been shot & killed.

There need to be checks & balances, & (criminal) consequences. If they're going to play w/ guns, then they must be held responsible (Same goes for me). The guilt-free passes need to end.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:47:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FedDC:

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
Very sad occurrence.

For those that have not served warrants, you might be surprised at how many homes do not display an address. This was a trailer park, and it is very common for there not to be addresses at trailer parks.

That is why the search warrants we served, even way back in the day, included a very specific description of the home.....color of the paint, color of the roof, description of the type of structure, etc. Photos were taken, if possible to assure we had the correct home. If an informant was used, he was required to verify the correct address.

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.



It can but trailer parks can be impossible...

I have been working a case on some mexicans that live in a trailer park where you lease the trailer from one owner who owns most of the trailers in the park. None of the streets in the park have a name. Maybe one in ten of the trailers have any sort of number on them. There is a central mailbox...but no names on anything, just A, B, C, D, etc. The mailman has no idea who lives where.

Just to make it fun, the residents all use false ID with stolen SSNs, names, etc so you can never really know who is who until you have them in custody and can print them and compare that to the ICE records.

Tons of people standing around all day makes it right at impossible to drive around and look without being spotted.

We are somewhat using Google Earth but even that has serious flaws because the streets aren't named.

People forget...criminals go out of their way not to be found and that includes things like car tags, house #s, etc.





Ok FedDC, you make a very good point, and so does O_P.

I think all of this could of been solved by having the UC agents verify the location they made the buy's from.


But you are right, most trailer parks are like rat warrents...
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:50:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Master_Blaster:

Originally Posted By FedDC:

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:
Very sad occurrence.

For those that have not served warrants, you might be surprised at how many homes do not display an address. This was a trailer park, and it is very common for there not to be addresses at trailer parks.

That is why the search warrants we served, even way back in the day, included a very specific description of the home.....color of the paint, color of the roof, description of the type of structure, etc. Photos were taken, if possible to assure we had the correct home. If an informant was used, he was required to verify the correct address.

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.



It can but trailer parks can be impossible...

I have been working a case on some mexicans that live in a trailer park where you lease the trailer from one owner who owns most of the trailers in the park. None of the streets in the park have a name. Maybe one in ten of the trailers have any sort of number on them. There is a central mailbox...but no names on anything, just A, B, C, D, etc. The mailman has no idea who lives where.

Just to make it fun, the residents all use false ID with stolen SSNs, names, etc so you can never really know who is who until you have them in custody and can print them and compare that to the ICE records.

Tons of people standing around all day makes it right at impossible to drive around and look without being spotted.

We are somewhat using Google Earth but even that has serious flaws because the streets aren't named.

People forget...criminals go out of their way not to be found and that includes things like car tags, house #s, etc.





In this particular context it's completely is understandable. 1st question that popped into my mind when I read this was, "How can anyone's address be distinguished in a trailer park?" I know tailers can be numbered, but depending on the particular park, it's not always going to be 100%. Where homes are concerned, however, I find wrong-address raids hard to accept. In many instances, such can be chopped up to brazen stupidity. I also do NOT like the cavalier, we-didn't-do-anything-wrong attitude some officers have protrayed in reported botched raids where innocent people have been shot & killed.

There need to be checks & balances, & (criminal) consequences. If they're going to play w/ guns, then they must be held responsible (Same goes for me). The guilt-free passes need to end.




but if they implemented a SOP similar to my departments it might have been avoided
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 3:56:20 PM EDT
Now that ladies and gentlemen is a no shit actual wrong address raid. That term gets tossed out alot when the cops have the right physical address but the person or contraband being searched for is not there. But in this case it really happened. The cops went to an address other than the one typed on the warrant.

The team aleader and his immediate suspervisior should both be fired.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:08:26 PM EDT
So.... is anyone gonna say that it's her fault for not having her house address properly marked/illuminated/numbered?

No Expert
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:10:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
Now that ladies and gentlemen is a no shit actual wrong address raid. That term gets tossed out alot when the cops have the right physical address but the person or contraband being searched for is not there. But in this case it really happened. The cops went to an address other than the one typed on the warrant.

The team aleader and his immediate suspervisior should both be fired.




They did seriously screw up. I hope they at least went back and paid to fix anything they broke and offered to hire a maid service to clean up the house.

Going through back doors can be strange....I once stood behind the wrong house when we were serving a warrant and I was on rear security. There were no fences and it was a row of townhomes...they all pretty much looked the same and I counted house to house based on the # of back doors. It would have worked but one had two back doors

It wasn't a big deal, we didnt enter from the rear but I looked pretty dumb standing behind the wrong house

These guys really do need to look at their SOP and make sure to bring the UC with them to point out the house.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:35:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By vrwc0915:
Pay carefull attention here:

"Raiding the wrong house was a mistake, but it's one the task force has been learning from, Brown said. The mistake could have compromised the investigation and deputy safety. Had the true suspects learned of the raid, they could have disposed of the narcotics and armed themselves in anticipation of a raid."

No mention of the possiblity of an innocent homeowner getting killed, shows what the priority is



+1000

A MONTH of preparation and then they screwed up??? They aren't earning their paycheck, are they?

The sheriff apologized. Not enough. The guy that planned the raid should be fired.

If I had an employee that put a customer in danger, I would fire him, and with good cause.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:41:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By No_Expert:
So.... is anyone gonna say that it's her fault for not having her house address properly marked/illuminated/numbered?

No Expert


I guess they got tired of beating that dead horse
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:54:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Echo_Hotel:

Originally Posted By callgood:
1: Cops drive to the pizza joint nearest 82 Hidden Lane .

2: Cops call pizza joint and order a pizza for 82 Hidden Lane.

3: Cops follow delivery boy.

4: Cops follow to the front door, pay for pizza, knock down door.

5: Cops eat pizza as they discuss the operation.


Brilliant!


It's so simple it just might work
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 4:58:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

I required my officers to not "tear up" the home in the search, as much as possible. It is not necessary to dump all the drawers on the floor, turn over beds, etc. We did a thorough, but not destructive search.

Common sense can prevail, if you want it to.



I have often wondered why that was necessary, to create as much damage as possible, then say, "Well, it's your fault, you should have been the people we were really looking for."

Can't searches be made to be minimally destructive? If a cabinet is locked, couldn't you ask for a key before deciding to break the door off?

And I cannot imagine what went through the head of the guy that handcuffed that old lady. Is that O2 on her? Could they not have simply had her sit down and had an officer watch her?
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:10:54 PM EDT
I used to be a pizza delivery dude and I gotta tell you there is house after house with no FUCKING ADDRESS and even streets with no signs. mIt's a pain in the ass and if you get lost the asshole custumer will want his free fucking pizza cause it's late. Well I wouldnt be late if you or any of your dumbfuck neighbors put an adreess on the front of your home! ASSHOLE!!!!!!!!

No fucking wonder cops go to wrong houses all the time!
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:24:56 PM EDT
Maybe they should invest in laser-targeting gear.


Forget shooting, JDAM that puppy.
Link Posted: 6/15/2007 5:25:51 PM EDT
The turds have started pulling the street signs in most neighborhoods to make things difficult for officers not familiar with the area.

The three check rule is outstanding. Very good Idea. I obtained a search warrant just a few months ago. Here, you have to damn near paint a picture for the District Attorneys office. The warrant described every pertinent detail about the location we were going to search.

But along with that, officers remained on scene with eyes on the location. There was no mistaking it.
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