Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 2/15/2013 4:29:14 PM EDT
I'm currently a D700 owner. I've been fortunate enough that my D700 has lasted me as long as it has, and produced stellar images. I'm also fortunate enough that when I got into photography, I spent money on a prime lens (85 1.4d) and a tele (24-70 2.8).

I have flat worn my D700 out. My last photo's exif data showed the shutter actuation at 312,593. I can tell it's struggling by the noises it makes during a shutter actuation. It has seen Nikon service and maintenance several times and I am grateful for it.

So, with that being said I am in the market for a new full frame DSLR. I've been pouring over reviews and information for the last couple of weeks and I've been pretty discouraged by what I see, from green tinted lcds, dust/oil spots, camera lockups (pre and post firmware upgrades) etc. Of course these issues are across models like the D4, D800 and D600, but with all 3 models being above $2k a piece, I'm wondering if it is indicative of current conditions at Nikon or not because I've decided on upgrading to the D800 when I get my tax return in a couple weeks.

I'm at the point where I am not completely tied up in Nikon glass, so making the switch to a Canon 5dMkIII wouldnt bankrupt me.

If you own a D800, what are your experiences with it from QC, use and ownership?
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 4:35:34 PM EDT
My D800E, purchased right after Christmas from B&H is great.
Coming from a D100 and then a D300, it's my first full frame body. I have been acquiring full frame glass for years, so I was GTG there.
My D800E is the best DSLR I have ever used.
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 4:43:13 PM EDT
How has the resolution altered your workflow?
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 4:51:18 PM EDT
I bought it mainly for landscapes and rattlesnake portraits.
Having said that, I won't shoot but a handful of images in a day so the larger files are not a huge deal to me, no pun intended. I could see if you were shooting a thousand or two images in a day/weekend at weddings etc, it might be a problem.
The detail is outstanding and the ability to crop and maintain excellent image quality is quite remarkable.
For everyday shooting, I kept the D300.
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 4:53:29 PM EDT
My wife has had a D70, D80, D90, D7000 and just purchased a D600 and loves it. I asked her about it and she said the D7000 does a real good job but she likes the D600 a little better. She said it has a "Full Frame" and much better low light picture quality.

She got it over Christmas. The D600 body, 24-85 Lens & a 70-300 Lens for $2300. Nikon was running some sort of special. She said the body alone is $1999 right now.

Maybe this helps
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 5:47:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By rapracing:
My wife has had a D70, D80, D90, D7000 and just purchased a D600 and loves it. I asked her about it and she said the D7000 does a real good job but she likes the D600 a little better. She said it has a "Full Frame" and much better low light picture quality.

She got it over Christmas. The D600 body, 24-85 Lens & a 70-300 Lens for $2300. Nikon was running some sort of special. She said the body alone is $1999 right now.

Maybe this helps


Thanks! The input does help, but I have unequivocally ruled out the D600 mainly because it doesn't serve as a lateral replacement or upgrade to my current body as I do use my equipment in a semi-professional capacity for extra cash. I've been spoiled by the mag alloy body, larger grip and weather seals. I played with the D600 at Costco a week or so ago, and even there, I saw the dreaded "oil on sensor" problem that I've been reading so much about. I'm happy that your wife hasn't experienced that! Of course, Costco has an amazing return policy, but I don't want to invoke it if at all possible.




Link Posted: 2/15/2013 5:53:40 PM EDT
I love mine. I'll post some pics once I get on an actual computer. The high resolution comes in really handy for me, because I do a lot of pics of small animals and like to crop.

It does seriously slow down any processing. Running it pics through Lightroom or Photoshop takes forever.
Link Posted: 2/15/2013 5:57:02 PM EDT
The Nikon D800/E & D600 own the top spots at DXOmark

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Ratings

I too am mulling over migrating to one of the three, having used Nikon 35mm for decades and having some good glass (180ED etc)

I am holding off for just a bit until I am comfortable the oil spot issues have been positively resolved, and Nikon offers some rebates that get the D800 into the $2500 range or D600 down to ~$1600-ish.

I just cannot justify taking a risk with that much money on something with known problems.

Link Posted: 2/16/2013 5:16:49 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Merrell:
The Nikon D800/E & D600 own the top spots at DXOmark

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Camera-Sensor-Ratings

I too am mulling over migrating to one of the three, having used Nikon 35mm for decades and having some good glass (180ED etc)

I am holding off for just a bit until I am comfortable the oil spot issues have been positively resolved, and Nikon offers some rebates that get the D800 into the $2500 range or D600 down to ~$1600-ish.

I just cannot justify taking a risk with that much money on something with known problems.



As low as I've seen the D800 go is the $2796 mark that is at right now. I'm not really holding my breath for much more. I haven't seen any reports of the oil spots in the D800, only the 600. Am I off my rocker?
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 6:17:03 PM EDT
I've had my D200 for almost 4 years and am just a little over 30K. You take a lot of photos!
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 6:21:05 PM EDT
I got a D800 for Chistmas, it's been perfect. I also had the D700 since 2009.

The 70-200/4 is truly awesome too.
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 6:31:42 PM EDT
I have had a D800 for a few months. I like it a lot. BUT... With the amount you shoot, be prepared to upgrade your computer's speed and storage. You will want USB 3.0, 24 megs of RAM and probably offboard RAID storage (So as not to fill up your internal HD). Everything about the images is spectacular. Camera has a few neat tricks like internally processed HDR images. Video quality is very good. If you are shooting to crop, just remember that you will need fairly high shutter speeds to make use of the cropped images since the sensor reveals flaws in lenses and technique that the D700 gave you a pass on. That being said, I still use my D700 a lot if I'm just doing something like location stills on jpeg. The file sizes are just easier to work with.

It's handy because you can practically skip a lens depending upon what you are shooting. If you have a 14-24 you can crop that to nearly a 50, Your 24-70 becomes a 24-140 and so on. Very few images require 36 mpx but you can create some incredible stitch landscapes and print large with incredible detail.
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 6:56:51 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2013 6:59:01 PM EDT by Stantonizm]
Here are some pics and a video I've done with the D800.







Here are a couple pics that show the cropping capability at full resolution. The second pic is just a crop from the first.





The high resolution also allows a lot more shadow detail to be brought out in post processing. Here are two versions of the same pic. The first one was unedited, minus stitching three frames together.

The second pic was edited using Lightroom and the Nik Software Color EFX plug-in. It was still a single exposure and not HDR. Look at how much detail was able to be brought out in the trees on the bank and in the buildings. I think the print size for this pic without losing any quality was 11x40 or so.






D800 does really nice video too. I'm trying to learn more about using it for that though. I just got a Glidecam stabilizer yesterday that I'm excited to try out.

This is my first and only attempt at making a real video. It was from a trip I took to Ecuador this past summer. It was all shot handheld.



I've only had two problems with the camera. The first was oil/dirt spots on the glass sensor cover. I ordered some swabs and sensor cleaner and it was really easy to take care of. Nikon said I could send it back to be cleaned under warranty, but it was easier to do myself. Plus, most of my photography is outside and I change lenses a lot, so I needed to learn to do it anyway.

The other problem wasn't the camera's fault. I fell face first into a stream and submerged it. It completely stopped working and I thought it was totaled, but I sent it back and they were able to fix it for $300. The serial # is the same, but I think they might have just sent me a new camera.
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 7:04:14 PM EDT
Damn, that's some nice work.

I'm still rolling a D100...

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 2/16/2013 9:32:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Stantonizm:
Here are some pics and a video I've done with the D800.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8040/8061676118_369ceb10c5_z.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8165/7619303686_4bab70e63c_z.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7243/7376886826_a6d6c16e5e_z.jpg

Here are a couple pics that show the cropping capability at full resolution. The second pic is just a crop from the first.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y170/Misifits0138/lizard-1.jpg

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y170/Misifits0138/lizardeye-1.jpg

The high resolution also allows a lot more shadow detail to be brought out in post processing. Here are two versions of the same pic. The first one was unedited, minus stitching three frames together.

The second pic was edited using Lightroom and the Nik Software Color EFX plug-in. It was still a single exposure and not HDR. Look at how much detail was able to be brought out in the trees on the bank and in the buildings. I think the print size for this pic without losing any quality was 11x40 or so.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y170/Misifits0138/uneditedbridge-1.jpg

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5320/7437930170_2a2667dea4_b.jpg


D800 does really nice video too. I'm trying to learn more about using it for that though. I just got a Glidecam stabilizer yesterday that I'm excited to try out.

This is my first and only attempt at making a real video. It was from a trip I took to Ecuador this past summer. It was all shot handheld.

http://youtu.be/EpkJBZUDBQ4

I've only had two problems with the camera. The first was oil/dirt spots on the glass sensor cover. I ordered some swabs and sensor cleaner and it was really easy to take care of. Nikon said I could send it back to be cleaned under warranty, but it was easier to do myself. Plus, most of my photography is outside and I change lenses a lot, so I needed to learn to do it anyway.

The other problem wasn't the camera's fault. I fell face first into a stream and submerged it. It completely stopped working and I thought it was totaled, but I sent it back and they were able to fix it for $300. The serial # is the same, but I think they might have just sent me a new camera.


That's some excellent work. Thanks for taking the time to put them up.

To the other, that shutter count is not indicative of my actual shooting habits. In 2010 I was doing a lot of contracted sports photography and burned a lot just by using continuous burst. Had I known an offer for sports photog would have landed on my desk, I would have sprung for the d3 platform at the time. Those days are over now and my professional use comes in the form of studio senior and bridal photos.

But I get what you're saying about the storage. Thank goodness storage is cheap these days.
Top Top