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Posted: 6/11/2018 12:38:12 PM EDT
I have been looking for new aspects of photography.
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NikonRumors-"Photographing Japanese food with a Nikon D750"
I'm Vincent from Paris, France and I created the website cecj2.com in 2008 about Japanese restaurants. As a semi-professional food blogger, I have read many books and articles on how to take food pictures. A tripod, a long distance lens (85mm at least) and a light diffuser were used, but none of these are possible when you are in a fancy Japanese restaurant in Tokyo or in a dive bar.
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Link Posted: 6/11/2018 3:27:36 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 3:35:53 PM EDT
fish223: I have been watching NHK broadcasts from Tokyo, and they have a thriving industry of making plastic/wax models of real food, and they look surprising real.
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 4:06:09 PM EDT
pics are nice enough, but that focus (depth of focus?) is a little rough in some of those shots. makes it difficult to view more than a few shots.
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 4:18:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 4:58:16 PM EDT
Use a shitty camera. 

Leave it to the viewer's imagination.



I want another good camera, and yet I don't. 
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 6:09:13 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By fish223:

Usually BETTER than the real thing.
Real food starts to lose it's shine and luster under the studio lights, colors change on cut vegatables, things start to wilt, liquids congeal, etc.
Food blogging is obviously different, it's shot right out of the kitchen and the set doesn't require studio quality.

Next time you look at that ad for the Big Mac, and wonder why it doesn't look the same out of the wrapper......
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All sorts of witchcraft used in professional food photography, or at least the ad side of it. WD-40, tampons, spray deodorant, engine oil, etc. You name it really. Basically so long as it looks realistic but doesn't screw up the product or gives a longer shooting time, it gets used.

Kinda creative what people come up with though. A while back I asked a BTS question about coffee photography, and those 'just poured' photos with the milk swirling in the 'coffee' sometimes are cream getting poured into a cooled mixture of gelatin and soy sauce, for example.
Link Posted: 6/11/2018 8:48:54 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fish223:

Usually BETTER than the real thing.
Real food starts to lose it's shine and luster under the studio lights, colors change on cut vegatables, things start to wilt, liquids congeal, etc.
Food blogging is obviously different, it's shot right out of the kitchen and the set doesn't require studio quality.

Next time you look at that ad for the Big Mac, and wonder why it doesn't look the same out of the wrapper......
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I have no doubt, food will look pretty $hitty after a few minutes just sitting even without the hot lights. I am doing research on marcro-photography and came across food photos. I am going to try my hand at flowers etc, and I may use one of those circular strobes, help eliminate the shadows.
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