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Posted: 8/28/2018 5:05:38 AM EDT
Went out with some friends to do some night shooting and took some muzzle flash shots. Gear was Canon 5DMkIII, Sigma 24-35, two Flashpoint speedlights with wireless remote and a wireless remote trigger for the camera. The AR shots were done with green tip that provided a nice fireball.









Link Posted: 8/28/2018 7:17:53 AM EDT
Good stuff.

When you say 'remote trigger' do you mean something with a photoelectric cell that opens the shutter when it sees light?

Forgive the newbie question.

Sounds like something that could be used for lightning photography too.
Link Posted: 8/28/2018 1:04:23 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Good stuff.

When you say 'remote trigger' do you mean something with a photoelectric cell that opens the shutter when it sees light?

Forgive the newbie question.

Sounds like something that could be used for lightning photography too.
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No. I just use a cheap Newer wireless remote. The shutter speed is 0.8 of a second. I tell the shooter to pull the trigger when they see the flash. Figure normal reaction time is about .2 seconds give or take a little. So I hit the remote and the shutter opens and flash fires capturing the shooter then the shooter pulls the trigger in the dark allowing the muzzle flash to show up.
Link Posted: 8/28/2018 7:05:31 PM EDT
Great shots no pun intended.
Link Posted: 9/12/2018 9:37:37 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By eracer:
Good stuff.

When you say 'remote trigger' do you mean something with a photoelectric cell that opens the shutter when it sees light?

Forgive the newbie question.

Sounds like something that could be used for lightning photography too.
View Quote
Some folks do use light triggers for lightning, but the easier way is to just set an intervalometer (built in on prosumer and up bodies) and just set a long exposure. I typicaly use 5-8 seconds for night (wide open) and about 1 second for daytime (and crank that f way the hell down).

This one was 2 seconds.

Lightning 20180808 by FredMan, on Flickr

This one was 4 seconds
Lightning 20180601 by FredMan, on Flickr
Link Posted: 9/14/2018 9:30:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/15/2018 8:45:05 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Zack3g:

I've never been able to get this to work. I set up a camera facing all the lightning, once I get it all set up, the lightning decides it wants to be elsewhere out of view.

I hate that shit.
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Oh, I've got thousands of frames of no lightning. Success rate is probably well under 5%, but when it works it works!
Link Posted: 9/22/2018 12:10:21 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
Oh, I've got thousands of frames of no lightning. Success rate is probably well under 5%, but when it works it works!
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Originally Posted By FredMan:
Originally Posted By Zack3g:

I've never been able to get this to work. I set up a camera facing all the lightning, once I get it all set up, the lightning decides it wants to be elsewhere out of view.

I hate that shit.
Oh, I've got thousands of frames of no lightning. Success rate is probably well under 5%, but when it works it works!
If you're using an intervalometer, just set up a second camera with overlapping exposure time. In other words, have your shutter open longer than the interval between shots. With 2 cameras you will only very rarely have both shutters closed at the same time. You'd get almost complete coverage of the storm, more likely to capture every strike than miss one.
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