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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 6/12/2003 10:54:57 AM EDT
[url][url]http://www.kyw1060.com/news_story_detail.cfm?newsitemid=30045[/url] Television newsman David Brinkley, who first gained fame as one-half of NBC's Huntley-Brinkley anchor team, has died at the age of 82. Brinkley died Wednesday night at his home in Houston of complications from a serious fall. During his career, Brinkley won 10 Emmy awards, three George Foster Peabody Awards and, in 1992, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. Former president George H. Bush called him "the elder statesman of broadcast journalism," but Brinkley spoke of himself in less grandiose terms. "Most of my life," he said in a 1992 interview, "I've simply been a reporter covering things, and writing and talking about it." He stepped down as host of ABC's "This Week with David Brinkley" in November 1996 but continued to do commentaries. He left amid a rare controversy, with an apology. Late on election night, near the end of a very long evening of broadcasting, he had called President Bill Clinton a "bore." Based in Washington and focusing on politics, Brinkley was known for his gentlemanly manner, wry wit and, as the Clinton incident illustrated, an occasional suffer-no-fools bluntness. Playing against such refinement were a boyish appearance and a style of delivery that suggested a mild case of hiccups. "If I was to start today I probably couldn't get a job," Brinkley once said, "because I don't look like what people think an anchorperson should look like." Brinkley's longtime anchor team partner, Chet Huntley, died in 1974 of lung cancer
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 10:57:26 AM EDT
Also on Fox news they are saying that actor Gregory Peck has died also.
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 11:22:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/12/2003 11:23:20 AM EDT by raven]
Originally Posted By Dredd308: "Most of my life," he said in a 1992 interview, "I've simply been a reporter covering things, and writing and talking about it."
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Journalists sorely need this kind of humility. When they think of themselves as somehow noble, or crusaders for those without a voice, policy experts, guardians of democracy, or worse yet: celebrities.......it's really stomach-churning. Because in reality, all they do is report what other people do and say.
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 11:27:23 AM EDT
Yeah, I think Bill O'Riley could take some of that advice.
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 11:34:29 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 11:42:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/12/2003 11:43:50 AM EDT by Mach1]
Ok, O'Riley is a bad commentator. [;)]
Link Posted: 6/12/2003 12:02:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By raven:
Originally Posted By Dredd308: "Most of my life," he said in a 1992 interview, "I've simply been a reporter covering things, and writing and talking about it."
View Quote
Journalists sorely need this kind of humility. When they think of themselves as somehow noble, or crusaders for those without a voice, policy experts, guardians of democracy, or worse yet: celebrities.......it's really stomach-churning. Because in reality, all they do is report what other people do and say.
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Unfortunately they now feel the need to make the news more than report it. Most journalists are simply spin-doctors now.
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