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Posted: 3/23/2011 3:56:06 PM EDT
I'll be closing on a house with a detached garage soon, and I want to put a wood-burning stove in the garage.  I was thinking of something like one of those Milsurp Arctic space heaters, but with a more permanent chimney.  I'm having the roof on the garage re-done shortly after closing, so if I do it, it'll be while the roof is torn up anyways.



What sort of code issues do I need to be aware of with something like this?  I'm guessing fire-rated drywall or concrete board behind the stove and chimney will be necessary?  Anything specific about the chimney I'd need to be aware of?  Would an inspector see a "portable" heater rigged up like that and shit himself?
Link Posted: 3/23/2011 3:59:48 PM EDT
Your just gonna have to check the codes in your specific area.  If you put up fire-proof board on the walls and run a double or triple wall pipe for the chimney through the wall you should be fine.
Link Posted: 3/23/2011 8:31:54 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Pavelow16478:
Your just gonna have to check the codes in your specific area.  If you put up fire-proof board on the walls and run a double or triple wall pipe for the chimney through the wall you should be fine.


Top of chimney above ridgeline of roof
Link Posted: 3/23/2011 8:33:48 PM EDT
Originally Posted By MrHold:
Originally Posted By Pavelow16478:
Your just gonna have to check the codes in your specific area.  If you put up fire-proof board on the walls and run a double or triple wall pipe for the chimney through the wall you should be fine.


Top of chimney above ridgeline of roof





It's a little more complicated than that...


Link Posted: 3/24/2011 6:42:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By beeragent74:
Originally Posted By MrHold:
Originally Posted By Pavelow16478:
Your just gonna have to check the codes in your specific area.  If you put up fire-proof board on the walls and run a double or triple wall pipe for the chimney through the wall you should be fine.


Top of chimney above ridgeline of roof





It's a little more complicated than that...




Care to elaborate?  Around here we just throw em in the garage and fire em up...
Link Posted: 3/24/2011 8:46:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Pavelow16478:
Originally Posted By beeragent74:
Originally Posted By MrHold:
Originally Posted By Pavelow16478:
Your just gonna have to check the codes in your specific area.  If you put up fire-proof board on the walls and run a double or triple wall pipe for the chimney through the wall you should be fine.


Top of chimney above ridgeline of roof





It's a little more complicated than that...




Care to elaborate?  Around here we just throw em in the garage and fire em up...


You're the one who suggested checking local code so I would think you would agree there is more to setting up a wood stove than slapping up some board and running some pipe.  There are very specific items approved for use in these applications along with very specific clearances to nearby flammable materials and a formula for figuring the proper chimney height above a roof.  There are people who will take something they read off an internet forum and consider that gospel truth without further research or info, for that reason I will not post specifics and again ask you to consult your local codes.  Wood burning fireplaces can be very effective AND safe as long as you follow the rules and don't try to cheat the system.
Link Posted: 3/24/2011 9:13:59 PM EDT
Local codes will vary.

A couple of things you may want to look at:

That stove puts out 15,000-25,000 - BTU, that's not a lot for heating a garage unless it's really small and well insulated. You could get the same heat from a kerosene heater like this with less hassle:

DuraHeat 23,000 BTU Portable Kerosene Heater

If you're committed to wood heat I'd go with something like this: Vogelzang Durango Wood-Burning Stove with Blower $599 and 73,790 BTUs. You'll most likely have less hassles with an inspector than you would with that MilSurp stove.

One final thing to consider, you'll want to check with your insurance company, many aren't thrilled about wood stoves in garages and may decline coverage of the structure and the contents.


Link Posted: 3/24/2011 9:18:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seabee_Mech:
Local codes will vary.

A couple of things you may want to look at:

That stove puts out 15,000-25,000 - BTU, that's not a lot for heating a garage unless it's really small and well insulated. You could get the same heat from a kerosene heater like this with less hassle:

DuraHeat 23,000 BTU Portable Kerosene Heater

If you're committed to wood heat I'd go with something like this: Vogelzang Durango Wood-Burning Stove with Blower $599 and 73,790 BTUs. You'll most likely have less hassles with an inspector than you would with that MilSurp stove.

One final thing to consider, you'll want to check with your insurance company, many aren't thrilled about wood stoves in garages and may decline coverage of the structure and the contents.





this is a very important point and you should ask them prior to doing anything.


Link Posted: 3/24/2011 9:22:36 PM EDT
Call building inspector, get copies of local codes in hand. Install stove to code, and have inspected. You will need the inspection approval for your insurance co. -I did.

enjoy !
Link Posted: 3/25/2011 3:38:56 AM EDT
Good points with the insurance issues and the portable kerosene heater.  I may go the kerosene route, since that would also be useful in the house in the event of a power failure.  I had emailed the town building inspector, but hadn't heard back.  Thanks guys!
Link Posted: 3/25/2011 11:30:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2011 11:31:27 AM EDT by Pavelow16478]
Originally Posted By beeragent74:

You're the one who suggested checking local code so I would think you would agree there is more to setting up a wood stove than slapping up some board and running some pipe.  There are very specific items approved for use in these applications along with very specific clearances to nearby flammable materials and a formula for figuring the proper chimney height above a roof.  There are people who will take something they read off an internet forum and consider that gospel truth without further research or info, for that reason I will not post specifics and again ask you to consult your local codes.  Wood burning fireplaces can be very effective AND safe as long as you follow the rules and don't try to cheat the system.


I agree theres a lot that goes into it and a lot that you need to be mindful of.  If your new to it please check your local codes and with insurance, etc...  It can be very simple to install and operate safely, but your codes and building inspector may be a PITA.  Around here they are not.  Just follow the basic guidelines and use some common sense and you will be fine.
Link Posted: 3/26/2011 3:32:24 AM EDT
State Farm insurance will not cover a detached garage period. The only thing I can put in my garage is a hanging propane heater.  That has to be done buy code.
Link Posted: 3/26/2011 8:34:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Grizz272:
State Farm insurance will not cover a detached garage period. The only thing I can put in my garage is a hanging propane heater.  That has to be done buy code.


My 30'X30' detached man cave is covered by State Farm.  No problem with coverage as long as there was NO wood burning stove.  I installed and overhead, natural gas heater –– no problem.
Link Posted: 4/1/2011 6:51:21 PM EDT
1k BTU Kero heater, in my 20x25 garage, whew.. Toasty.

Plug it in and forget it.

Link Posted: 4/3/2011 8:22:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By grumpy-old-man:
Originally Posted By Grizz272:
State Farm insurance will not cover a detached garage period. The only thing I can put in my garage is a hanging propane heater.  That has to be done buy code.


My 30'X30' detached man cave is covered by State Farm.  No problem with coverage as long as there was NO wood burning stove.  I installed and overhead, natural gas heater –– no problem.


You definitely need to check with your insurer, but also check your state's case law and insurance bureau. Here in Maine, we had a wonderful gent actually push the issue to court because his insurer tried to deny him coverage with a woodstove. He made a great case that the safety issue involves having it up off the floor enough so that gasoline fumes can't get to it and cause a fire/explosion. His had been elevated and the court found no safety issue and forced the insurer to cover him. IIRC, the court had the state Fire Marshall issue an opinion (which sided with the homeowner) and that ended the issue. Now all anyone here has to do is to properly elevate one and point out the case law to the insurer to get it ok'd. Most will still tell you you can't do it, but will cave when you push it (mine did). The same can be argued with local code inspectors and it works here for the same reason.
Link Posted: 4/3/2011 8:30:15 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Hiaboo:
1k BTU Kero heater, in my 20x25 garage, whew.. Toasty.

Plug it in and forget it.



ONE K, I do believe it's just a wee bit larger then that. I use a 100K salamander myself, sucker kicks out the heat when I want it with no delay which is what I want.

OP, building codes are different everywhere, you HAVE to check locally then get with your insurance company. Also, remember that since most people have gasoline in garages, most fixed heaters have to be raised above the floor to help prevent ignition of gasoline fumes. Gasoline and heat sources do not mix well together.
Link Posted: 4/4/2011 5:23:06 AM EDT
insurance companies hate stoves in garages...
just saying...
get one for inside your house, they are far more useful.
Link Posted: 4/28/2011 6:03:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Seabee_Mech:
Local codes will vary.

A couple of things you may want to look at:

That stove puts out 15,000-25,000 - BTU, that's not a lot for heating a garage unless it's really small and well insulated. You could get the same heat from a kerosene heater like this with less hassle:

DuraHeat 23,000 BTU Portable Kerosene Heater

If you're committed to wood heat I'd go with something like this: Vogelzang Durango Wood-Burning Stove with Blower $599 and 73,790 BTUs. You'll most likely have less hassles with an inspector than you would with that MilSurp stove.

One final thing to consider, you'll want to check with your insurance company, many aren't thrilled about wood stoves in garages and may will decline coverage of the structure and the contents.




Unless the outbuilding will not have flammable liquids stored in it.  This includes gas tanks on vehicles.  ANything with a garage door is assumed to be used for vehicles.  If it was a structure with a man door, you could call it a wood shop, for example.

I know a ton of people with stoves in their garages.  I always tell them it is a bad idea.  THey always say, "wow, I never knew that" followed by some variant of "but I don't give a shit."

Your local codes are another matter, but I have never heard of anyone being bothered for it around here, and it is explicitly against the codes.


Link Posted: 5/2/2011 12:26:45 PM EDT
Things to keep in mind that will be covered by your local codes:

Clearance (side, top, rear, front) to flammables
Diameter of flue
Requirement to use UL listed materials
Requirement to use materials from the same manufacturer (may prohibit metalbestos brand storm collar being used with simpson brand flue, even if the stuff fits together fine)
Placement of flue
Height of flue (generally three feet above nearest rooftop point within 10 feet)



Homeowners insurance needs to know you have one out there or the garage will likely not be covered if the stove burns it down.
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