Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 3/27/2009 11:16:50 AM EST

New police car cameras never forget when and where they saw a license tag. They can scan thousands of them a day.
By Ihosvani Rodriguez | South Florida Sun-Sentinel
March 26, 2009

HOLLYWOOD - Meet the Hollywood Police Department's new license plate scanner. It already may have met you.

The multi-camera and scanner system, mounted on the trunk, hood, or roof of a cruiser, takes pictures as the officer drives through the city looking for stolen vehicles and criminals. The camera is capable of snooping through as many as 10,000 license plates a shift, leaving officials a bit giddy about its effectiveness.

"These things are awesome," said Hollywood Police Lt. Scott Pardon, whose traffic unit, in just a few weeks, recovered one stolen car, one stolen tag and made two arrests. Hollywood is not the only place where police cars have eyes.

Similar systems have been tested or used by at least a half-dozen law enforcement agencies in South Florida, including the sheriff's departments in Broward and Palm Beach counties.

The Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office first used plate scanners in 2007, and three unmarked units sweep them through parking lots and special events. The department also uses them to track gang members and sex offenders.

The Boynton Beach Police Department has the system on one cruiser. Boca Raton is researching using the system, which costs about $30,000 per vehicle.

Police everywhere say it's an effective crime-fighting tool while allowing officers to multi-task.

But privacy-rights groups take issue with authorities taking and storing information on noncriminals, something they say is too Big Brother-like.

"If I have never gotten a ticket or have never done anything wrong, I should have the right to know if the picture of my car is in the database, and what are they doing with it," said Lillie Coney, with the Washington, D.C.-based Electronic Privacy Information Center.

Organizations like Coney's and the American Civil Liberties Union worry that many law enforcement agencies are failing to establish policies governing how police can use the information that's collected.

"It's not that they are looking at license plates and taking pictures of cars belonging to innocent people," said Barry Butin, co-counsel of the ACLU's Broward chapter. "We are more concerned with what they do with the information later."

Butin and others say there's a potential for misuse, such as an officer tracking a girlfriend, or police prying into the comings and goings of law-abiding citizens.

In Aventura, police have been taking thousands of images and tag information since December. They say the information is stored permanently for possible use in future investigations. Punch in a tag and, if the scanner ever came across it, the system will indicate where and when.

Plate recognition systems vary by vendor, but most work the same way: Once a camera shoots an image of a tag, the plate number is run through a constantly updated database of stolen cars and tags. A computer inside the cruiser alerts the officer when it finds a hit.

During a recent demonstration, Aventura Police Officer John Methvin drove around the Aventura Mall parking lot, zipping through three tags a second as his car slowly cruised the aisles. His cruiser has three sets of cameras mounted on the roof. He processes about 2,000 tags a day, most of them at the mall.

A laptop computer plays a steady beat of "clicks" after each picture is taken. Suddenly, an alarm alerts Methvin to a "possible stolen car."

"I get this one every time I drive by here," he said. It's a mall employee whose Florida plate has letters and numbers that match a stolen car from Canada.

The Broward Sheriff's Office, which covers 14 cities including Pompano Beach, Tamarac and Cooper City, has 35 license plate recognition systems mounted on patrol cars and at fixed locations throughout the county, scanning an average of 300,000 plates a month, said spokesman Mike Jachles. The department has been using the system about a year.

Many departments say the goal is to have all agencies share the same information.

Police emphasize the scanning system does not run a full background check on every tag. That would overload the database system, they said.

"It's a crime-fighting tool used to find violent offenders or violent criminals. This is not Big Brother watching," Jachles said. "We're not looking for expired tags, or things like that. If we did, we would be too busy to do other things."

Ihosvani Rodriguez can be reached at ijrodriguez@SunSentinel.com or 954-385-7908.

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/broward/sfl-flbscanners0326sbmar26,0,6025039.story
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:18:59 AM EST
It'll be interesting to see the comments on this one.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:19:59 AM EST
San Diego PD has been playing with those for about a year. I got pulled over at night for having my registration expired by ONE DAY. I told the officer that I had already paid but not yet received my sticker. He let me go.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:20:20 AM EST
Slippery slope...
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:20:21 AM EST
One part of me says...use what's most effective. The other part says...cameras watching us all the time is bad...

As a citizen, it sucks I suppose...especially if you are a criminal...but if I was in a position of authority...this would be badass!!! I agree with the police's assessment.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:23:38 AM EST
New cameras in police cruisers can analyze thousands of license tags a day


This is the same kind of kind of reporting that the media does on firearms, dumbass and incompetent.

The cameras don't analyze anything, they just produce images.

The analysis of those images is done by software on computer.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:27:29 AM EST
had a tv show with this system in a suv filled with gear and the cameras on the roof scanning left right comin and going. i thought it was pretty cool. they had other cops in large pickups in the area. the pickups had heavy duty bumpers. and finally they had a chopper or two in the air.. was cool to watch em work, not unlike watchin the ac 130s in afghanistan. all that technology and the badguys dont even know they're going get popped till all the front and rear positions are suddenly blocked. on this show they only showed stolen cars getting tagged...

sooner or later such scanners will be on every corner. you want be able to drive a block without skynet knowing where you are in realtime. course they can do that now with your cellphone..

final solution is DNA sniffers placed in grids everywhere, they will register your DNA at birth and the sniffers will keep up with your physical locations at all times. total unending surviellance by the system.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:29:34 AM EST
Shitcago has em mounted on marked suburbans rolling around the city for about 18 months. Seen it in action when I was still assigned to that wasteland.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:30:36 AM EST
Originally Posted By muzlblast:
Slippery slope...


Yeah, but what does a slippery slope matter, when you're on the bottom trying to dig deeper?
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:30:40 AM EST
Awesome. On any given shift, an Officer might have to manually check dozens of vehicles. It costs him time, concentration, and makes him more vulnerable to a traffic collision.

These will make the roads safer and enable Officers to focus their intention on law breakers, instead of chasing phantoms constantly.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:33:26 AM EST
That's bullshit, i want that shit taken offline, they just voided the cool license plate swapper button in jason stathams car in the transporter movies, fucking lame!

Police work needs to be done just like the Clint Eastwood movies, a crazy guy with a deep voice and a big gun who shoots child molesters and bank robbers in the chest, CASE SOLVED.

None of this whamsi pamsie automated camera system shit.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:38:45 AM EST
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:42:41 AM EST
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:43:56 AM EST
Originally Posted By mcantu:
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...


concur
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:44:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 11:45:32 AM EST by SIPCAT-C]
Originally Posted By mcantu:
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...


True, but it won't be.

I suspect they'll even make remote cameras (traffic cameras) that do this.

'they' will know where you are and when.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:52:13 AM EST
Great, All we have to do now is make sure the criminals are wearing their plates.

If the the JBTs put as much effort into catching violent criminals as they do harassing the motoring public, the world would be a safer place.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:55:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 11:58:56 AM EST by Aimless]
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:55:52 AM EST
Originally Posted By packnru:
Great, All we have to do now is make sure the criminals are wearing their plates.

If the the JBTs put as much effort into catching violent criminals as they do harassing the motoring public, the world would be a safer place.


I am very proud of the number of violent criminals who have made it into the back of my car simply by "harassing the motoring public."

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:08:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By Aimless:
These things are turning out to be nightmare. In NY if you don't pay a traffic ticket fine, or blow off a ticket, or fail to pay your car insurance, or fail to pay your child support etc your driver's license is revoked and you are guilty of a crime if you drive. These scanners work great at catching all the mostly harmless dopes who do these kinds of things, the courts are getting plugged up with tons of bullshit misdemeanor charges now. I know one Court that has to start a special week just for trying all these no license cases. Great use of resources.

Course police unions fight gps in their cars tooth and nail, I bet a camera scanner that tracked where patrol cars would be really popular "Oh car # 42 is parked at the adult book shop/a female officer's home but officer is married to someone else/the diner for more than the allowed lunch time"


Solution: Take those "bullshit misdemeanor charges" off the books so they can concentrate on what's important.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:25:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By packnru:
Great, All we have to do now is make sure the criminals are wearing their plates.

If the the JBTs put as much effort into catching violent criminals as they do harassing the motoring public, the world would be a safer place.


As one of my Officer friends told me, "The easiest way to catch real scum are traffic stops."
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:26:09 PM EST
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 2:44:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


If they planned on deleting all records, as soon as they were created, unless they got a "hit" I'd agree.
The potential for abuse here is incredible, and if the government has taught me anything, it's taught me that it *will* abuse any power it's given.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 2:44:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 2:44:27 PM EST by learath]
Double tap. I fail.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 2:48:33 PM EST
Originally Posted By learath:
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


If they planned on deleting all records, as soon as they were created, unless they got a "hit" I'd agree.
The potential for abuse here is incredible, and if the government has taught me anything, it's taught me that it *will* abuse any power it's given.


I simply do not see the big deal whether or not they store the data.

This is nothing like the NIC check issues, for example - driving is not a right, nor is nay privacy to be expected as to when and where we were on the public roads.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:01:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 3:40:02 PM EST by Ky_Bob]
Wait until they are mounted on light poles all over the city and they can track your movements so they can charge you your "fair share" of road usage tax, based on the mileage recorded in their database.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:07:45 PM EST
I don't see the issue either. We've had ANPR (ALPR) gear in PoPo cars for some years here. Personally I think they're great, the PoPo get all the bad guys who drive by and also when they're out an about cruising. Before ANPR in cars, they would do random stop and checks, and if you worked odd hours that was a PITA, now I don't get random pull-overs anymore.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:10:26 PM EST
Pretty soon they will track our every movement. I don't like this, the potential for abuse is too strong.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:12:14 PM EST
1984.... Yous Has It.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:14:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By learath:
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


If they planned on deleting all records, as soon as they were created, unless they got a "hit" I'd agree.
The potential for abuse here is incredible, and if the government has taught me anything, it's taught me that it *will* abuse any power it's given.


I simply do not see the big deal whether or not they store the data.

This is nothing like the NIC check issues, for example - driving is not a right, nor is nay privacy to be expected as to when and where we were on the public roads.


Why not just chip everyone and track us with GPS. If we arent' doing anything wrong whats the biggie?
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:14:43 PM EST
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:18:02 PM EST
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


You guys are at the leading edge of surveillance. A camera on every corner, a camera on every cop car, a microphone on every trash bin. DO they have a camera on every toilet seat yet?
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:19:06 PM EST
They got that in my town a few months ago. So far it has all been illegals that they seem to have gotten hits on. They all got stopped for driving without a licence, registration, and insurance.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:20:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


An automated system that permanently records and correlates location and time data is vastly different than the normal display of a license plate and occasional observation (and very, very infrequent recording) of location and time data.

You carry ID on you (presumably). Would it be OK if the ID were scannable––say, RFID? And it were illegal to block the RFID signal, and illegal to travel without your ID? And would it be OK if the government had a record of every doorway, elevator, and signpost you walked past, with location and time data recorded?
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:22:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 3:23:07 PM EST by vito113]
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


You guys are at the leading edge of surveillance. A camera on every corner, a camera on every cop car, a microphone on every trash bin. DO they have a camera on every toilet seat yet?



Actually, the camera/surviellance technology over here is usually American designed and made…
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:22:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 3:24:14 PM EST by BangStick1]
Originally Posted By California_Kid:
San Diego PD has been playing with those for about a year. I got pulled over at night for having my registration expired by ONE DAY. I told the officer that I had already paid but not yet received my sticker. He let me go.




Wha??? The article specifically states that they are not looking for expired tags or they'd having no time for anything else.

I'm calling



Wait until the cops show up on your doorstep because your car was not parked in its usual spot and
'they just want to make sure you are ok.'




Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:23:18 PM EST
Originally Posted By packnru:
Great, All we have to do now is make sure the criminals are wearing their plates.

If the the JBTs put as much effort into catching violent criminals as they do harassing the motoring public, the world would be a safer place.


You do realize that a large percentage of wanted felons are caught as a result of simple traffic stops...........
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:23:27 PM EST
No expectation of privacy when operating a state licensed motor vehicle on public roadway.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:23:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By vito113:
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


You guys are at the leading edge of surveillance. A camera on every corner, a camera on every cop car, a microphone on every trash bin. DO they have a camera on every toilet seat yet?



Actually, the camera/surviellance technology over here is usually American designed and made…


That may be true but you have to admit it is in much wider use across the pond.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:24:37 PM EST
Originally Posted By vito113:
I don't see the issue either. We've had ANPR (ALPR) gear in PoPo cars for some years here. Personally I think they're great, the PoPo get all the bad guys who drive by and also when they're out an about cruising. Before ANPR in cars, they would do random stop and checks, and if you worked odd hours that was a PITA, now I don't get random pull-overs anymore.




We dont care what you have to say in this thread.

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:28:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By Ky_Bob:
Wait until they are mounted on light poles all over the city and they can track your movements so they can charge you your "fair share" of road usage tax, based on the mileage recored in their database.


They do this in London now, as part of a "smog/ congestion tax". If you drive your car 2 inches into the zone you are electronically charged a fee of 8£ per day.

When is enough enough??
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:28:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


An automated system that permanently records and correlates location and time data is vastly different than the normal display of a license plate and occasional observation (and very, very infrequent recording) of location and time data.

You carry ID on you (presumably). Would it be OK if the ID were scannable––say, RFID? And it were illegal to block the RFID signal, and illegal to travel without your ID? And would it be OK if the government had a record of every doorway, elevator, and signpost you walked past, with location and time data recorded?


Your latter scenario has juts gone beyond public roads requiring licensing / registration for use, to the realm of all movement. BIG difference. Your former explanation is akin, again, the the gun grabbers saying only muskets are protected by the second. Just as rights stay the same as technology advances, so do powers.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:30:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By SIPCAT-C:
Originally Posted By mcantu:
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...


True, but it won't be.

I suspect they'll even make remote cameras (traffic cameras) that do this.

'they' will know where you are and when.



You should see some of the things I have built for clients....
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:31:34 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
Originally Posted By KS_Physicist:
Originally Posted By Bohr_Adam:
I fail to see the privacy issue. You have no expectation of privacy driving your licensed vehicle on public roads. Displaying your license tag is a requirement for driving on said roads - just for this reason. All this technology does is make enforcement more efficient.

Saying this violates some privacy thing is akin to an anti-gunner saying AR15s aren't covered by the 2d Amendment - solely because they weren't around when it was written.


An automated system that permanently records and correlates location and time data is vastly different than the normal display of a license plate and occasional observation (and very, very infrequent recording) of location and time data.

You carry ID on you (presumably). Would it be OK if the ID were scannable––say, RFID? And it were illegal to block the RFID signal, and illegal to travel without your ID? And would it be OK if the government had a record of every doorway, elevator, and signpost you walked past, with location and time data recorded?


Your latter scenario has juts gone beyond public roads requiring licensing / registration for use, to the realm of all movement. BIG difference. Your former explanation is akin, again, the the gun grabbers saying only muskets are protected by the second. Just as rights stay the same as technology advances, so do powers.




So then wouldnt it be easier to just put GPS in everyones car? That way they dont have to set up readers all over a city?
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:31:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By vito113:
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


You guys are at the leading edge of surveillance. A camera on every corner, a camera on every cop car, a microphone on every trash bin. DO they have a camera on every toilet seat yet?



Actually, the camera/surviellance technology over here is usually American designed and made…


That may be true but you have to admit it is in much wider use across the pond.


True, but it's been noted by our various freedom/rights organization that an aweful lot of US companies are active in the surviellance field over here. Suspicious minds would come to the conclusion they were developing /refining the technology in a more 'permissive' legal framework before making the final and field proven product available on the domestic market.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:32:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By ChrisLe:
Originally Posted By packnru:
Great, All we have to do now is make sure the criminals are wearing their plates.

If the the JBTs put as much effort into catching violent criminals as they do harassing the motoring public, the world would be a safer place.


You do realize that a large percentage of wanted felons are caught as a result of simple traffic stops...........


You do realize that you can justify *any* intrusion on the public using that bullshit, statist-friendly logic, right?

If you stop 1000 cars, there is definitely a good chance you will find someone doing something wrong, and probably somebody who is wanted for something quite serious. It's just unfortunatte for the 999 other people who got caught in the dragnet and should not have. We have no semblance of the concept of liberty or freedom that any of our nation's founders who be familiar with.

I'm not that worried about all these so-called dangerous people out there. Maybe if the system had not harassed them so much in the first place they might not have turned out so bad. We have 20+ million illegal aliens inside the US, a number growing each day, and we can't seem to get a line on any of them. So don't piss down my back and then tell me it's raining! When I want a cop, I'll call one!









Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:32:39 PM EST
Originally Posted By USGI_45:
Originally Posted By vito113:
I don't see the issue either. We've had ANPR (ALPR) gear in PoPo cars for some years here. Personally I think they're great, the PoPo get all the bad guys who drive by and also when they're out an about cruising. Before ANPR in cars, they would do random stop and checks, and if you worked odd hours that was a PITA, now I don't get random pull-overs anymore.




We dont care what you have to say in this thread.





That would explain why you chose to take note of what I posted and comment on it…
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:32:46 PM EST
Originally Posted By CWO:
Originally Posted By SIPCAT-C:
Originally Posted By mcantu:
if there is no hit on the plate, the info needs to be deleted ASAP...


True, but it won't be.

I suspect they'll even make remote cameras (traffic cameras) that do this.

'they' will know where you are and when.



You should see some of the things I have built for clients....




Silenced precision rifles with special anti camera ammo?

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:33:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 3:34:06 PM EST by RarestRX]
Originally Posted By VT4meGunCtrlisAntiUS:
Originally Posted By Ky_Bob:
Wait until they are mounted on light poles all over the city and they can track your movements so they can charge you your "fair share" of road usage tax, based on the mileage recored in their database.


They do this in London now, as part of a "smog/ congestion tax". If you drive your car 2 inches into the zone you are electronically charged a fee of 8£ per day.

When is enough enough??


Aren't they also doing time to distance tickets in the UK?

Where they scan your license leaving London, then scan it again when you get to your destination. You arrived in 45 minutes. If you drove the speed limit, it should have taken 1 hour.

Here's your ticket in the mail!
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:33:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By vito113:
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By vito113:
Originally Posted By bookertbab:
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


You guys are at the leading edge of surveillance. A camera on every corner, a camera on every cop car, a microphone on every trash bin. DO they have a camera on every toilet seat yet?



Actually, the camera/surviellance technology over here is usually American designed and made…


That may be true but you have to admit it is in much wider use across the pond.


True, but it's been noted by our various freedom/rights organization that an aweful lot of US companies are active in the surviellance field over here. Suspicious minds would come to the conclusion they were developing /refining the technology in a more 'permissive' legal framework before making the final and field proven product available on the domestic market.


I don't deny that. I don't like it one bit though. If they want to sell this stuff to other people who will put up with it I don't care. But when it is installed in my town I do care.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:35:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 3:36:13 PM EST by s1rGr1nG0]
Originally Posted By Taffy223:
ANPR has been here for some time.

But I guess you guys already knew us subjects we being watched.....

Cheers

Taffy


God I hope so!! Someone listening to me take a shit deserves everything they hear.

ARGH! quoted the wrong damn post.

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 3:36:06 PM EST
Originally Posted By vito113:
Originally Posted By USGI_45:
Originally Posted By vito113:
I don't see the issue either. We've had ANPR (ALPR) gear in PoPo cars for some years here. Personally I think they're great, the PoPo get all the bad guys who drive by and also when they're out an about cruising. Before ANPR in cars, they would do random stop and checks, and if you worked odd hours that was a PITA, now I don't get random pull-overs anymore.




We dont care what you have to say in this thread.





That would explain why you chose to take note of what I posted and comment on it…



We dont care if you guys like sucking big brother's dick.

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top