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12/11/2018 1:58:31 AM
11/9/2018 9:21:38 PM
Posted: 3/12/2005 9:53:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 7:15:10 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]
I've got 2-3 PC's and a laptop here at home, and would like them to all print to one printer...

All computers now are currently plugged into a Linksys router via ethernet cables, which is plugged into my cable modem to access the internet...

For some reason, I thought they would just "sniff" for a printer, find it, and prompt the setup/install wizard... I figured this because they all plug in to a common point.

Anyway, my networking skills are shit (at best) and I need to know what to buy, install, plug in correctly, etc..
I think all the stuff is here to do it, I just don't know how to get it to all work together...

FWIW... All are running Win XP Pro.
PC#1 is a Dell @ 2.4ghz/512mb ram
PC#2 is Sony Vaio @ 1.5ghz/256mb ram
PC#3 is a Dell Optiplex @ 450mhz/256mb ram
Laptop is a Dell Inspirion 7500 @ 650mhz/256mb ram

Printer is a Lexmark X4270

I'm willing to "start from scratch" if there is an optimal way for all this stuff to be "networked" in my home...


Thanks in advance...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:05:26 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:07:54 AM EST by DefMan]
Two ways you can do this. One you can buy a Print Server. They go for like 40-50 bucks on sale these days. Or you can use the MicroSoft Networking Wizard. Only downside to this is that youll have to leave one computer running for it to be a dedicated printer server. If you want to go this route, Open My Network Places on one of your machines and go through the Networking Setup Wizard. XP wizard should walk you through it. I just bought a print server so I don't have to leave my machine on. This can be done through both wired and wireless via your router. It's easy as pie.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:06:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:07:04 AM EST by TheCynic]
If the machines are already
networked, what about one
of these?

Then you would just install
the printer as a network
printer on all of the other
PCs on the network.

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:09:41 AM EST
here is how we do it for 3 machines and 1 printer.
The printer is installed on one machine that is on 24/7 (needs to be on for the rest of us to print) And the other 2 machines are networked and have the printer installed over the network.
Its pretty simple, you just pop in the installation cd and there should be a selection for the network install.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:10:03 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:10:58 AM EST
Can't help with networking, but an easy solution is a Share Switch. They are available to handle up to 4 computers. Simplest are manual and cost $15 or less.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:11:29 AM EST
Pick up a usb print server (about $30) at CompUSA or any other computer shop/Staples. It's a little box about 3" square but 1" thick. One end of the print server is USB and the other is ethernet. The print server will show up on your network as an attached printer and you can then add the printer to all your machines as the default printer. This allows any PC on the network to use stand alone printer.

An alternative to this is to attach the printer to one central PC and turn on file and print sharing in the control panel. Then all the other PCs can map to the shared printer. The down side is that the computer that the printer is attached to must be left on so that people can send print jobs to the printer.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:13:06 AM EST
You might check to make sure your router doesn't have a print server built into it.

I hava D-Link andit does.

If you have a machine that is on all of the time, you can connect your printer directly to it and share it out. You would then browse for it from the other machines and right-click on it and select "connect". Otherwise, get a print server. They make life much easier.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:16:00 AM EST
My prefered way to do this is with a hardware print server, however you can still accomplish the same thing with everything you already have.

1. Pick a computer that's always on and convienently located in the home. Plug your printer into this PC, and make sure it works OK (install the drivers, etc).

2. On the PC with the printer installed, open up the control panel, then "Printers and Faxes". Find the printer, right click on it, and select "sharing".

3. On the "sharing" tab, select the "Share this printer" radio button and give your printer a name.

4. Note the name of the computer that this printer is connected to. If you don't know, you can right-click on "My Computer", select "properties" and select the "Computer Name" tab.

5. At this point, you have shared the printer attached to your PC with other PC's on the network. To print from another PC, open the Control Panel and "Printers and Faxes". Click "Add Printer". Click Next. Select "A network printer, or printer attached to another computer" and click next.

6. Select "Connect to this printer (or to browse for a printer...)" and type \\ComputerName\PrinterName. (Remember the name of the computer and printer from earlier?) For example: \\LivingRoomPC\HPDJ940c. Click next.

7. The rest is pretty stright forward. Just read the prompts and do what it says.

Hope that helps!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:32:51 AM EST
by a 35 dollar Linksys 811b wireless hub and get a USB wireless printer adaptor

then you can put the printer somewhere convienient and print & surf the web from the wireless equipt laptops
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:55:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 11:00:38 AM EST by Dragracer_Art]

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
My prefered way to do this is with a hardware print server, however you can still accomplish the same thing with everything you already have.

1. Pick a computer that's always on and convienently located in the home. Plug your printer into this PC, and make sure it works OK (install the drivers, etc).

2. On the PC with the printer installed, open up the control panel, then "Printers and Faxes". Find the printer, right click on it, and select "sharing".

3. On the "sharing" tab, select the "Share this printer" radio button and give your printer a name.

4. Note the name of the computer that this printer is connected to. If you don't know, you can right-click on "My Computer", select "properties" and select the "Computer Name" tab.

5. At this point, you have shared the printer attached to your PC with other PC's on the network. To print from another PC, open the Control Panel and "Printers and Faxes". Click "Add Printer". Click Next. Select "A network printer, or printer attached to another computer" and click next.

6. Select "Connect to this printer (or to browse for a printer...)" and type \\ComputerName\PrinterName. (Remember the name of the computer and printer from earlier?) For example: \\LivingRoomPC\HPDJ940c. Click next.

7. The rest is pretty stright forward. Just read the prompts and do what it says.

Hope that helps!



I tried this, and it seems the "other" computers can't see the printer...
I've got it set to "share files and printers"
I've tried the network wizard several times, but it still seems like they aren't "seeing" each other.
Is it possible that the Linksys router won't allow networking through it ?

PC# 1 has he printer plugged into it via USB

PC#1, PC#2 and the laptop are connected to the router via ethernet cable...

Ultimately, I'd like any PC to be able to print independently to the printer without having to leave PC#1 turned on.

This means I need a "Print server" ??? I'm not a fan of wireless anything, so it sounds like a lot more wires are needed...

Edit to add:

When I run the "Add printer Wizard", it wont find the Lexmark printer...
When it searches for printers, all it comes up with is "Microsoft Windows Network"
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 12:00:18 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
My prefered way to do this is with a hardware print server, however you can still accomplish the same thing with everything you already have.

1. Pick a computer that's always on and convienently located in the home. Plug your printer into this PC, and make sure it works OK (install the drivers, etc).

2. On the PC with the printer installed, open up the control panel, then "Printers and Faxes". Find the printer, right click on it, and select "sharing".

3. On the "sharing" tab, select the "Share this printer" radio button and give your printer a name.

4. Note the name of the computer that this printer is connected to. If you don't know, you can right-click on "My Computer", select "properties" and select the "Computer Name" tab.

5. At this point, you have shared the printer attached to your PC with other PC's on the network. To print from another PC, open the Control Panel and "Printers and Faxes". Click "Add Printer". Click Next. Select "A network printer, or printer attached to another computer" and click next.

6. Select "Connect to this printer (or to browse for a printer...)" and type \\ComputerName\PrinterName. (Remember the name of the computer and printer from earlier?) For example: \\LivingRoomPC\HPDJ940c. Click next.

7. The rest is pretty stright forward. Just read the prompts and do what it says.

Hope that helps!



I tried this, and it seems the "other" computers can't see the printer...
I've got it set to "share files and printers"
I've tried the network wizard several times, but it still seems like they aren't "seeing" each other.
Is it possible that the Linksys router won't allow networking through it ?

PC# 1 has he printer plugged into it via USB

PC#1, PC#2 and the laptop are connected to the router via ethernet cable...

Ultimately, I'd like any PC to be able to print independently to the printer without having to leave PC#1 turned on.

This means I need a "Print server" ??? I'm not a fan of wireless anything, so it sounds like a lot more wires are needed...

Edit to add:

When I run the "Add printer Wizard", it wont find the Lexmark printer...
When it searches for printers, all it comes up with is "Microsoft Windows Network"



You don't need to bother browsing for the printer. When you get to that point, enter the UNC path of the shared printer in the text box, i.e. "\\KitchenPC\HPLJ4Plus" (or whatever computer name/printer name you have). If you insist on browsing for it and see "Microsoft Windows Network" then double-click on "Microsoft Windows Network" and start drilling down until you find the computer and printer you're looking for.

Your Linksys Router/Switch is fine. In this scenario (sharing a printer over a LAN), you're not using it as a router. It's just a simple switched network. If you're concerned about computers "seeing" each other, then try this:

1. On PC#1, click 'start' then 'run'.
2. Type 'cmd' and press enter.
3. Type 'ipconfig' and press enter.
4. Note the IP address, i.e. '192.168.0.5'
5. Go to PC#2 and perform steps 1 and 2.
6. Type 'ping <ip address'>, i.e. 'ping 192.168.0.5' (using PC#1's ip address of course).

If you get "request timed out" while performing step #6, then you have a problem. If you see replies in step #6, then your computers are communicating with each other fine, which also means that you're simply not sharing or adding your printer correctly.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 12:24:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 7:16:12 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

If you insist on browsing for it and see "Microsoft Windows Network" then double-click on "Microsoft Windows Network" and start drilling down until you find the computer and printer you're looking for.




I tried that, and it does nothing...
Could my Norton Internet Security be a problem here ???
I remember seeing something about stealthed ports, and that I wasn't "pingable". Tried the DSLreports tweak test before, and it said I was un-pingable... Whatever that means...

Right now, if there is no "wizard" to do the thinking for me, I'm about at my wits end fucking with these things...
I'll go buy a goddamn printer splitter/hub/switch gizmo...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 12:30:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

If you insist on browsing for it and see "Microsoft Windows Network" then double-click on "Microsoft Windows Network" and start drilling down until you find the computer and printer you're looking for.




I tried that, and it does nothing...
Could my Norton Internet Security be a problem here ???
I remember seeing something about stealthed ports, and that I wasn't "pingable". Tried the DSLreports tweak test before, and it said I was un-pingable... Whatever that means...

Right now, if there is no "wizard" to do the thinking for me, I'm about at my wits end fucking with these things...
I'll go buy a goddamn printer splitter/hub/swith gizmo...



Tell ya what: If you want, IM me and I'll set up a web conference using my company's Meeting Place servers. It will allow me to walk you through the process (you can opt to allow me to VIEW your desktop).

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 12:39:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 12:54:25 PM EST by MormonComputerZ]
Networking with Firewalls

The steps that SubnetMask is suggesting are perfect. Let me add my 2 cents.

1. Turn off your Windows XP Internet Connection Firewall on EVERY computer. Right click My Network Places and select Properties. Right click Local Area Connection and select Properties. Go into the Advanced Tab. If you have Service Pack 2, click the Settings button and select Off. Otherwise make sure the ICF check box is not checked. Click OK. After all machines have the ICF off, proceed to step 5.
2. If you want to keep Norton Internet Security running on the machine to which the printer is installed, get the IP Address for all your machines like Subnet suggested and start adding them into the trusted zone in your Firewall Configuration.
3. Open Norton Internet Security, click on Norton Personal Firewall and down towards the bottom right you'll see a yellow button that says, "Configure".
4. I forget the tab, I think it's Home Networking, you'll want to click Add and either add the whole Subnet as trusted (192.168.0.0) or just add each individual IP (192.168.x.x) to be trusted.

Once these IPs are added into your firewall, and your Windows XP ICF is off, try it. If you want to try it before anything or adding any IP's, disable Norton first, w/ the ICF off, and see if the other machines can ping away.

Good luck!

_________________
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 5:13:26 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 5:17:52 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]

Originally Posted By MormonComputerZ:
Networking with Firewalls

The steps that SubnetMask is suggesting are perfect. Let me add my 2 cents.

1. Turn off your Windows XP Internet Connection Firewall on EVERY computer. Right click My Network Places and select Properties. Right click Local Area Connection and select Properties. Go into the Advanced Tab. If you have Service Pack 2, click the Settings button and select Off. Otherwise make sure the ICF check box is not checked. Click OK. After all machines have the ICF off, proceed to step 5.
2. If you want to keep Norton Internet Security running on the machine to which the printer is installed, get the IP Address for all your machines like Subnet suggested and start adding them into the trusted zone in your Firewall Configuration.
3. Open Norton Internet Security, click on Norton Personal Firewall and down towards the bottom right you'll see a yellow button that says, "Configure".
4. I forget the tab, I think it's Home Networking, you'll want to click Add and either add the whole Subnet as trusted (192.168.0.0) or just add each individual IP (192.168.x.x) to be trusted.

Once these IPs are added into your firewall, and your Windows XP ICF is off, try it. If you want to try it before anything or adding any IP's, disable Norton first, w/ the ICF off, and see if the other machines can ping away.

Good luck!

_________________
home.comcast.net/~tomandkatie/MormonComputerZ_Sig_01.jpg




Well.. That 'sorta makes sense...
Maybe if I read it three more times it will sink in better...

I do have XP Pro SP2, so that could be complicating things too...

Had to run out to dinner with the wife earlier, and just got home... Now I can tinker with these 'puters a bit...

Thanks for all the help guys !
I think I will print out this thread for reference...

Subnetmask...
I sincerely appreciate the offer for direct assistance, but I think that's WAY over my head... I think you would grow tired very quickly of my stupid questions and lack of computer schmartz...

I'll fumble around with this stuff 'till I figure it out...
I think you guys gave me enough good info to keep me busy for awhile...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 5:15:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By MormonComputerZ:
Networking with Firewalls

The steps that SubnetMask is suggesting are perfect. Let me add my 2 cents.

1. Turn off your Windows XP Internet Connection Firewall on EVERY computer. Right click My Network Places and select Properties. Right click Local Area Connection and select Properties. Go into the Advanced Tab. If you have Service Pack 2, click the Settings button and select Off. Otherwise make sure the ICF check box is not checked. Click OK. After all machines have the ICF off, proceed to step 5.
2. If you want to keep Norton Internet Security running on the machine to which the printer is installed, get the IP Address for all your machines like Subnet suggested and start adding them into the trusted zone in your Firewall Configuration.
3. Open Norton Internet Security, click on Norton Personal Firewall and down towards the bottom right you'll see a yellow button that says, "Configure".
4. I forget the tab, I think it's Home Networking, you'll want to click Add and either add the whole Subnet as trusted (192.168.0.0) or just add each individual IP (192.168.x.x) to be trusted.

Once these IPs are added into your firewall, and your Windows XP ICF is off, try it. If you want to try it before anything or adding any IP's, disable Norton first, w/ the ICF off, and see if the other machines can ping away.

Good luck!

_________________
home.comcast.net/~tomandkatie/MormonComputerZ_Sig_01.jpg



Good suggestions. I got lazy and asked him to let me set up a Meeting Place conference, 'cause I'm tired of typing.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 6:26:12 PM EST
OK... I think it's working now...
I turned off the Windows Firewall...
I disabled Norton Internet Security...
I noticed there is a "trusted" sites box for home networking...
If I configure Norton on all the computers to trust "192.168.0.0" will they all continue to work ???
Or must I specify differently ???

At least now, I've got them all networked and I can swap files back and forth, or print between all computers...

NOW...
What must I do to make everything continue to function when I enable Norton again ?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 6:38:28 PM EST


NOW...
What must I do to make everything continue to function when I enable Norton again ?



Leave Norton off. Re-enable Windows firewall. Do you still have connectivity to other machines (and printers)?

If yes:

Leave Norton off. Windows Firewall will protect you, as long as you keep it updated.

If no:

Turn on Norton. Do you still have connectivity? If neither one of these ideas works, it is a combination of both demons, and I can't concentrate enough to figure it out tonight.

Solution is unclear. (as spoke the magic 8-ball) Ask again later...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 6:38:39 PM EST

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
If I configure Norton on all the computers to trust "192.168.0.0" will they all continue to work ???
Or must I specify differently ???

At least now, I've got them all networked and I can swap files back and forth, or print between all computers...

NOW...
What must I do to make everything continue to function when I enable Norton again ?



With adding the 192.168.0.0 Network Range to Norton Personal Firewall (NPF), all of your machines that connect to that Router of yours should be able to still communicate with the one sharing the printer. Try enabling it. After enabling NPF, and you notice that they can no longer see that computer, then you know you need to tinker with NPF some more. Keep in mind, if you have a fairly new router (for example a Linksys) it more than likely has a NAT Firewall (Hardware Firewall) that will keep you protected already.

Even though I run through a NAT Firewall, I also run BlackICE, but honestly it isn't necessary. It's your call however on what you want to do. If you need help configuring your firewall in Norton, I'm sure Subnet or myself could get you through it.

Either fire him off an email or myself.

tomandkatie at comcast dot net

Glad it's working for you though and you know what the "obstacle" was.

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 6:44:30 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 6:45:16 PM EST by MormonComputerZ]

Originally Posted By techdudenc:
Leave Norton off. Re-enable Windows firewall.



In the situation that you're in Dragracer, and no offense to you techdudenc, don't turn Windows ICF back on. For the network you're running at home, and for resolving the issue that we were able to, I would not turn ICF back on. Yes you can configure it, but it's more of a headache than anything.

As far as networking, Windows ICF is a pain the arse unless you know how to configure it to allow IP's, Ports, and Services (I don't think you'll want to do that). As far as protection, it's great, but unneeded right now since you have NPF. Don't turn Windows ICF back on please. You'll be asking for more assistance.

Once again, no offense techdudenc. Just throwing out ideas for Dragracer.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 6:54:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 6:57:12 PM EST by Dragracer_Art]
I 'gotta tell ya...

YOU guys are somethin else !!!

Everything is now networked, firewalled, and functioning 100%

I went into Norton, and set the trusted addy to 192.168.0.0 / 255.255.255.0

Do you guys suppose I can turn Windows firewall back on without having probs ? OR, should I leave well enough alone ?

EDIT to add...
Just read post above...
If y'all think Norton is adequate, then I'll leave a sleeping dog lay... And quit while I'm ahead...

Thanks again for the help guys !!!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:00:08 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 7:00:44 PM EST by SubnetMask]

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:
I 'gotta tell ya...

YOU guys are somethin else !!!

Everything is now networked, firewalled, and functioning 100%

I went into Norton, and set the trusted addy to 192.168.0.0 / 255.255.255.0

Do you guys suppose I can turn Windows firewall back on without having probs ? OR, should I leave well enough alone ?



If your everything is working, leave your Windows firewall off. You only need ONE software firewall, and having more than one will only cause you grief. My guess is you will find your Norton firewall easier to configure, though between the two, I PERSONALLY would prefer to use what comes with Windows. (Actually, I'm behind a PIX, which I like even better, but that's another post).

Also, not to be nit-picky () but are your ip addresses actually 192.168.0.x?


ETA: You're very welcome, BTW!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:14:26 PM EST

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Also, not to be nit-picky () but are your ip addresses actually 192.168.0.x?




Oh Hell... I dunno...

I typed "192.168.0.0" and it works...

Did I just somehow compromise my network security or something ?

This shit is like rocket science to me...
You guys 'gotta keep it simple, and with few sentances or I'm lost...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:20:01 PM EST
tag
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:21:21 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 7:25:12 PM EST by SubnetMask]

Originally Posted By Dragracer_Art:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Also, not to be nit-picky () but are your ip addresses actually 192.168.0.x?




Oh Hell... I dunno...

I typed "192.168.0.0" and it works...

Did I just somehow compromise my network security or something ?

This shit is like rocket science to me...
You guys 'gotta keep it simple, and with few sentances or I'm lost...



Nah, you're probably fine. If you had an IP address scheme of say 192.168.0.[1-254] and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 (/24 BTW ) then you'd be technically fine. Now that I think of it, your network must be 192.168.0.x, because if it wasn't, then your fix wouldn't have worked due to the network and mask you specified as trusted.

If your network was say 192.168.1.x and you specified your trusted network as 192.168.0.0/255.255.0.0 then you would be designating a rather large range of addresses as trusted. It STILL wouldn't matter much, as the 192.168.0.0 network is a private range and isn't routeable over the internet (meaning somebody that has that address at home can't be considered trusted).

It's just better to have your trusted network defined accurately.

So never mind.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:23:25 PM EST

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

So never mind.



That's all I needed to hear...

Mission accomplished !
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 7:32:20 PM EST

Once again, no offense techdudenc. Just throwing out ideas for Dragracer.


No offense taken.

They were suggestions, after all. What works for the few doesn't necessarily work for the many.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 3:05:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/13/2005 3:13:15 AM EST by MormonComputerZ]
Glad it all worked out for you Dragracer!!! As far as the 192.168.0.0, I had suggested that earlier as it would be a whole lot easier and quicker for you to accept the entire Network Range than to add each individual machine. Even though having a definitive list of all of your machines' IP's in there is usually the route to take; ether way works. I'm with Subnet in his opinion about Norton being more User Friendly. Stick w/ that one and just keep Windows ICF off.

SubnetMask, mind me asking what you do for work? You really know your networking.

_________________
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 3:26:48 AM EST
If your computers are already connected, you probably don't need any other hardware.

My wife's computer and mine are connected via a router, as we share a cable modem.

The printer is connected to her computer.

I had to "select new printer" on my PC, and search the "network" for it on her machine.

You have to do this with the firewall inactive, or set to allow your computer's probing.

Turn the printer sharing on within her Windows: control pannel, printer, (select printer), print sharing.

If you have a firewall....
With Zonealarm firewall, you can set it to allow certain IP access.
I set it so her computer allows access when my computer wants to print.
I also have to set mine for the same, because the printer wants to reply to my computer
during the data conversation.


Link Posted: 3/13/2005 4:28:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By MormonComputerZ:
Glad it all worked out for you Dragracer!!! As far as the 192.168.0.0, I had suggested that earlier as it would be a whole lot easier and quicker for you to accept the entire Network Range than to add each individual machine. Even though having a definitive list of all of your machines' IP's in there is usually the route to take; ether way works. I'm with Subnet in his opinion about Norton being more User Friendly. Stick w/ that one and just keep Windows ICF off.

SubnetMask, mind me asking what you do for work? You really know your networking.

_________________
home.comcast.net/~tomandkatie/MormonComputerZ_Sig_01.jpg



I'm a Voice Network Engineer. I design, implement and troubleshoot IP based call centers and phone systems using Cisco Technologies. My employer is a large Cisco partner and is even mentioned in a couple of Cisco Press books.

Prior to that, I was a straight Network Engineer - an IOS/PIX/Catalyst/Concentrator/server/etc kind of dude. Now I just do IP Telephony stuff all day. I love my gig.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 4:46:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I'm a Voice Network Engineer. I design, implement and troubleshoot IP based call centers and phone systems using Cisco Technologies.



I do NOT envy you. We're finalizing our Phone System right where I work. We went the route of Setel (Southeast Telecom) for all of our VoIP. Our next step is implementing the OTM w/ Active Directory. This is something I'm not looking forward to.

Twas good working w/ you in getting Drag's network up and running. Definitely will see you around!

Link Posted: 3/13/2005 5:31:09 AM EST

Originally Posted By MormonComputerZ:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
I'm a Voice Network Engineer. I design, implement and troubleshoot IP based call centers and phone systems using Cisco Technologies.



I do NOT envy you. We're finalizing our Phone System right where I work. We went the route of Setel (Southeast Telecom) for all of our VoIP. Our next step is implementing the OTM w/ Active Directory. This is something I'm not looking forward to.



You'd envy me if you saw how easy and just plain cool Cisco's solution is.



Twas good working w/ you in getting Drag's network up and running. Definitely will see you around!


Back at 'ya!
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