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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 9/25/2004 2:39:40 PM EST
we had Snap on, SK, and mack come to our school trying to sell us tools, yet they all look the same to me.

i've worked with craftsman all my life so i really dont know any better.

any suggestions? experiances with any of the mentioned brands?

Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:41:27 PM EST
currently my brand of choice is matco for a balance of reason

given the MONEY i'd get snap-on except for a few items
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:44:30 PM EST
Snap-On is a big No-No here in my area, they just closed a plant about 15 miles from here in IL a few months back, several hundred lost their jobs. So in response, lots are selling their Snap-On stuff and going with Matco or one of the others.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:49:29 PM EST
Klein for screwdrivers, side cutters, wire strippers, torpedo levels, nut drivers, etc - electrician type tools. Channel Lok for channel locks. Craftsman channel locks suck.

Had an SK socket set years ago and it was great. We've been using Stanley socket sets at work lately and they seem to hold up fine. Craftsman sockets are pretty good. I like the Stanley wratchets better.

I use Craftsman for wrenches - open/box end.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:50:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By GUNGUY1911:
Snap-On is a big No-No here in my area, they just closed a plant about 15 miles from here in IL a few months back, several hundred lost their jobs. So in response, lots are selling their Snap-On stuff and going with Matco or one of the others.



Did they move overseas, or just close the one near you?
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:53:55 PM EST
Matco is the way to go. Matco dealers usually will work with customers on pricing - I have found most Snap-On dealers don't give a shit whether one buys or not. I love the spline drive ratchets - a must have for any garage!.

www.matcotools.com/Catalog/toolcatalog.jsp?cattype=T&cat=2232&select=
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 2:54:26 PM EST
If you make your living with tools, especially in the automotive industry, Snap On are the best.
Matco has good stuff as well but MAC sucks IMO.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:08:54 PM EST
Always preferred SK ratchets to others, but I gotta say that Snap-On is pretty good stuff...or used to be at least!
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:10:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By Backstop:

Originally Posted By GUNGUY1911:
Snap-On is a big No-No here in my area, they just closed a plant about 15 miles from here in IL a few months back, several hundred lost their jobs. So in response, lots are selling their Snap-On stuff and going with Matco or one of the others.



Did they move overseas, or just close the one near you?

I'm not sure if they moved it or just closed it, I just moved here about a year ago, and it was mostly done with then.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:13:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By GUNGUY1911:
I'm not sure if they moved it or just closed it, I just moved here about a year ago, and it was mostly done with then.



Thanks. Another American plant
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:21:37 PM EST
Snap-On if you can afford the best. SK is Ok as is Craftsman, Cornwall, MATCO, Allen and a few others. AVOID Chinese JUNK such as most of Harbor Freight. Buy ONLY quality in hand tools.

I have a lot of MAC but refuse to buy more. Their ratchets suck. Main plant is now in Texas and staffed with Mexicans. Quality has gone to hell IMHO. Used to be based here. Sabina plant (near me) still forges sockets and some wrenches. Place is too contaminated to shut it down.

If you are to make your living with tools, buy the best you can find. Buy SOMETHING every week until you have everything appropriate to your type of work. NEVER sell your tools except to buy more/better. You can always make a living with your tools, or at least take care of your own needs or become an assett to other folks if SHTF. The short-term money from selling them always disappears, leaving you no way to make more.


My .02 orth.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:25:01 PM EST
I own them all , and a dozen others . I hold no loyalty to any manufacture . Each
makes a tool or tools that are better at the job its designed for then the others , and
is based on how you use your tools . What's right for me , won't be right for others .
Kinda like women

Many will say that they all cost too much , and I agree if your just buying them for
home/hobby use , but me ...... They make me money , so if it pays for itself before it
breaks or wears out from then on it's profit .
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:28:04 PM EST
Check out Husky tools at Home Depot for sockets, rachets and box wrenches.
Like was said earlier, Klien for screwdrivers, lineman's pliers, - most eletrical tools. but I hate their channel lock pliers.
Cresent makes a good adjustable wrench.
Only Ridgid for pipe wrenches!
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:54:01 PM EST
The reasons I buy mostly Craftsman.

1) Easy to exchange (I can cut a wrench in two with a torch, and still exchange it.)

2) Made in the U.S.A. (I will not buy foreign made tools.)

3) Large selection of tools in stock.

4) Price (Craftsman tools are much more reasonable than Snap-On.)

5) It seems like there is always a sale going on at Sears.


I have found most Snap-On dealers don't give a shit whether one buys or not.


Snap-On only gives a shit if your a major account.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 3:56:57 PM EST

Originally Posted By angry_walkin_dude:
The reasons I buy mostly Craftsman.

1) Easy to exchange (I can cut a wrench in two with a torch, and still exchange it.)

2) Made in the U.S.A. (I will not buy foreign made tools.)

3) Large selection of tools in stock.

4) Price (Craftsman tools are much more reasonable than Snap-On.)

5) It seems like there is always a sale going on at Sears.


I have found most Snap-On dealers don't give a shit whether one buys or not.


Snap-On only gives a shit if your a major account.



+1
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:06:54 PM EST
Buy quality is right.If you want a measure of quality a few years ago when my brother was an airplane mechanic (jet engine plant) the only hand tools they were allowed to use snap on. Craftsman and if I remember correctly Matco. Don't let anybody tell you that you need to spend 3x as much on Snap on tools to make a living. Buy Craftsman now and in a few years when you can afford it you can buy Snap on if you want them and take the Craftsman home for your hobby cars.You said school so remember those student loans on top of that big Snap on payment. Good luck.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:20:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/25/2004 5:24:08 PM EST by TexRdnec]
my problem with craftsman is shitty moving parts tools and some out of spec hand tools.................specifically i've had problems with their basic standard size wrenches

i'll have, say a 1/2 nut and a craftsman is too tight to fit it.....................so ill throw the fucker across the shop and go get a 1/2 snap-on and it works fine
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:23:09 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:23:32 PM EST
Here at the Airport we have Mac and Snap-on and one independant that sells used stuff but I've always bought Mac and Mac will carry S*K and other brands for less price too
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:26:56 PM EST
I've got a lot of old Thorsen (US made) hand wrenches and a big set of Easco wrenches, ratchets, sockets, and pull handles. These were excellent tools in the early 80's, don't hear much about them any more.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 5:27:26 PM EST
I use a little bit of everything. I have mostly Snap On though. Why? Because whatever company I have worked for there is always a Snap On dealer that comes there.

I have not seen a Cornwell dealer in years. I still have broken tools from them that I need to exchange if I ever find a dealer.

The same with Mac and Matco. Although those dealers I run into once in a while.

Link Posted: 9/25/2004 9:10:11 PM EST
My stepfather is the worlds greatest lifelong mechanic. Years ago I told him that Craftsman was a great tool and he showed me (hard to believe) that his Snap-on combination wrench was actually a tighter fit than my Craftsman. I still use Craftsman and he still has his Snap-ons. He said that he never hired a man that didn't think enough of his trade to have Snap-on tools.
M
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 9:18:15 PM EST
Ive prefered Craftsman, a good price for the quality, easy exchange. I have went with Snap on a few times, Craftsman doesnt make straight edges. If I wanted my tools to last 8 life times I would buy Snap on, but I only need one life time, if my son uses them, thats great, but doesnt matter to me.
Link Posted: 9/25/2004 9:24:20 PM EST
one craftsman tool i do not like are their screwdrivers. ive gone through way too many and the tips just do not seem to hold up well. even with the replacement it was such a pita that i started looking for something else. found a german make, wiha-microfinish, that i've been very pleased with.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 6:54:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By torstin:
one craftsman tool i do not like are their screwdrivers. ive gone through way too many and the tips just do not seem to hold up well. even with the replacement it was such a pita that i started looking for something else. found a german make, wiha-microfinish, that i've been very pleased with.



You want a tough screwdriver, buy a Klein. I'm an electrician (commercial) and abuse my screwdrivers - use them to loosen/tighten connector lock rings in a box, knock out knock-outs on boxes, pry with them, use them to ream out small Wiremold after it's cut, etc. Yeah it's abuse, but sometimes it's the only way to do things.

Anyway, I've seen guys new to the trade show up with Craftsman screwdrivers and they don't last for shit. Granted, this is extreme, used outside the design parameters of the tool, but there it is.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 7:12:56 AM EST
Snap on if you'll be working at a shop. So IF one breaks, he comes to you. Home shop I'd go with Cratsman. They break more often, but its just a short trip to Sears. I have a Snap On box and many tools along with many Cratsman tools. I love Snap On, but I ave a broken ball tip hex driver that has been sitting because I have to flag down hte Snap On guy the next time I see him.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 7:27:44 AM EST
And another thing,

Craftsman tape measures SUCK!! During certain phases of a job (rough-in), I use a tape all day everyday. I broke 4 of them in less than a year. The locking mechanism broke, the blade broke, etc. Pieces of shit. You can call the Sears at Rolling Oaks Mall in SA - I was in there Friday and one guy still remembers me. I got sick of going back, so switched back to Stanley tapes.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:08:23 PM EST
I wouldn't presume to argue with the fine people who've posted here. And for most things, you have moe than enough info. But, having been an electrician for 26 years, and owned & re-built a British motorcycle and a British sailboat, I say to you... you owe it to yourself to examine the Stanley "100 Plus" line of Stanley screwdrivers, before you buy any others. Good luck and Stay safe.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:43:56 PM EST
I went and looked at them on the Stanley site - tough to get a good idea that way. Where do they sell them, I'll check them out. Quality wise, where do they fall in relation to Klein? How about the price compared to Klein?

Thanks.
Link Posted: 9/26/2004 4:50:29 PM EST

Originally Posted By Backstop:
Klein for screwdrivers, side cutters, wire strippers, torpedo levels, nut drivers, etc - electrician type tools. Channel Lok for channel locks. <snip>



I am in total agreement with the above statement.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:18:14 AM EST
They ARE very similar to Klein. Price will be comparable. In my opinion...they hold their "edge" MUCH better, although I have no idea why, metal-wise. Personally, I don't feel that screwdrivers are wrenches, but I do feel that they should be able to be rolled or spun with the support fingers on the shafts when the screw becomes easy but you still have alot of threads. As you may suppose, I HATE square-shaft screwdrivers. For me, they have that certain ? something ? You're the one that's gotta like 'em, though. I've ordered through Grainger ... they'll deliver and $ was fair. Stay safe
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 1:21:45 AM EST
Im using a GreatNeck set here for what work I have to do. Its held up good soo far and was damned cheap.
Link Posted: 9/27/2004 2:09:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2004 2:29:42 AM EST by kindstranger]
I work with tools everyday on instruments in my lab where the rule is every thread is chased and prepped and every bolt is torque checked. I generally get Craftsman for most hand tools with the following exceptions: (notice a trend?)

Fluke meters. No others allowed! (have a local guy to keep them in calibration)

Klein electrical tools...can get them at Sears and Home Depot...Lowes

Crecent, Channel Lock, Vice Grip all are good for their namesake products

Craftsman beam-type torque wrenches for general "left out on the bench" use. Cheap and accurate.

Snap-On clicker torque wrenches although the Husky (Home Depot) ones are real good!

I am a real advocate of having inexpensive "beater" torque wrenches that are OK. It keeps the good ones from being borrowed or used in abusive ways.

Craftsman professional combo wrenches are real good unless you prefer Snap-On Flank Drive.

Ryobi cordless drills. They're not real good, but we beat the snot out of them, and we just replace them and send the worn out ones home with students and employees as favors.


Most of the vendor technicians (usually have a Ph.D.) use Facom.

Get Craftsman to start, but get a Snap-On general service 3/8" socket set and set of combo wrenches when you get the funds. These two things along with my Fluke meters and Snap-On torque wrenches live in my desk drawer in my office.

Edited to add: I'm starting to be a real believer in Knipex and Whia products, especially the Knipex Cobra pliars. Top notch stuff, resembles Klein in alot of ways...

Craftsman sells Cobra pliars under the Craftsman name, but they're Knipex and stamped "Made in Germany"

Edited to add: If you ever get an Air Compressor, PLEASE get a real oil and piston unit. They cost ever so slightly more, and be found in the mix at Sears, Home Depot, Lowes, etc... They last a LOOOONG time if cared for. I have seen ALOT of the "oil less" compressors crap out...even some real expensive ones...
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 9:13:23 AM EST
Reviving this thread because I also wanted to get feedback from wrench turners...
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 9:19:51 AM EST
All I use are Snap On, I bought most of mine when I could write them off of my taxes.
If you cant write them off, why pay the extra money when some other brands are just as good.
I will exception to their Wrenches and Ratchets.......you cant beat them.

If you are getting yours through school Snap On gives students a better discount than their employees so maybe you are going to want to pick up what you can
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 9:45:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/28/2004 9:58:16 AM EST by CAMPYBOB]
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 9:56:46 AM EST
My dad uses Matco for his mechanic business. Used to buy Snap-on but prices got out of hand. Also sometimes uses Craftsman.

Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 10:28:32 AM EST
Most of my hand tools are Craftsman. Not all are made in USA! I've got my 3/4 " ratchet in my lap and it says TAIWAN. I had a Snap-on ratchet in the past and I really liked it. I lost my tools once upon a time and when it came time to replace them I found Craftsman to be the best value for me. When our son got old enough I started buying him his own Craftsman tool set so he wouldn't use mine.

Never loan your tools!
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 11:18:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By angry_walkin_dude:
The reasons I buy mostly Craftsman.

1) Easy to exchange (I can cut a wrench in two with a torch, and still exchange it.)

2) Made in the U.S.A. (I will not buy foreign made tools.)

3) Large selection of tools in stock.

4) Price (Craftsman tools are much more reasonable than Snap-On.)

5) It seems like there is always a sale going on at Sears.


I have found most Snap-On dealers don't give a shit whether one buys or not.


Snap-On only gives a shit if your a major account.



+2

I love snap on and Mac tools, but they're just too expensive, Craftsman are American made, damn good warrenty,

some problesm with Craftsman, the socket's chrome will peel off, and the ratchets mechanism goes out, so I've got a snap on 3/8 ratchet and just replace the socket's as needed, but the warrenty makes it well worth it.
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 11:28:29 AM EST
tagged for later
Link Posted: 9/28/2004 11:37:26 AM EST
Most of the hand tools I have are Craftsman. They work good enough for me and have a great warranty. I've broken 2 or 3 of their tools, and I just take it back and get another one, no questions asked.
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