Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
Member Login

Posted: 4/26/2015 2:16:20 PM EDT
Don't know where to start.  It drains on the north end of our attached garage and with any heavy rain will flow around the slab and south over the driveway.  It was going under the driveway (concrete) and washed some dirt out but we had it urathane filled to prevent it cracking.  I need to route the gutter around the the back of the house, 30-40 feet and let it drain in the yard.  I'd like it all buried.  I also need to work it under a fence and some loose pave stones.  

I've seen some youtube videos but that's about all.  Anywhere that has some good step by step directions?  I know I can do it myself, it will just be time consuming.  No need to pay anyone to do something I can do.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 8:35:07 PM EDT
Grading is going to be the hard part ... just make sure your slope is all down, put a layer of gravel under the pipe to take up shifting soil, and use PVC as a riser at the house end. They make downspout-to-PVC adapters.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 9:52:46 PM EDT
FPNI





Enjoy the digging, and make sure the slope is always going down.
Link Posted: 4/26/2015 10:50:06 PM EDT
One other thing...

8-1-1

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 5:59:09 AM EDT
Start at the high end and work to the discharge end, making sure that you keep a continuous down slope, doesn't need to be a consistent slope, but must be continuous.

After getting your BUD number from 811 rent one of these.

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 7:11:34 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bulldog8:
Start at the high end and work to the discharge end, making sure that you keep a continuous down slope, doesn't need to be a consistent slope, but must be continuous.

After getting your BUD number from 811 rent one of these.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQvfH4vxTkc35MjMwqmgn0OdkRvNxCKplE8luavi­Bi5Eo1o65Hv
View Quote



Talk about over kill it's a gutter drain only 30 or 40 feet long and most likely no bigger than 4" that can be dug by hand. Op I suggest you use SCH 40 PVC it wont collapse  like the thin wall PVC or black corrugated pipe does
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 8:39:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2015 8:43:46 AM EDT by w33b8t1]
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.

I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 9:25:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:



Talk about over kill it's a gutter drain only 30 or 40 feet long and most likely no bigger than 4" that can be dug by hand. Op I suggest you use SCH 40 PVC it wont collapse  like the thin wall PVC or black corrugated pipe does
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By Bulldog8:
Start at the high end and work to the discharge end, making sure that you keep a continuous down slope, doesn't need to be a consistent slope, but must be continuous.

After getting your BUD number from 811 rent one of these.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQvfH4vxTkc35MjMwqmgn0OdkRvNxCKplE8luavi­Bi5Eo1o65Hv



Talk about over kill it's a gutter drain only 30 or 40 feet long and most likely no bigger than 4" that can be dug by hand. Op I suggest you use SCH 40 PVC it wont collapse  like the thin wall PVC or black corrugated pipe does


Lol, im not saying arfcom over-exaggerates, but you need this if you want to get this 20-40 feet drain accomplished.

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 9:50:54 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History

This. You could also use perforated black pipe if you don't mind allowing the water to soak into the ground along the drain path.

You can also consider a dry well at the end of the run instead of a pop-up drain.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 12:00:59 PM EDT
Lay out your run and start trenching.  Over excavate the bottom of the trench.



Drive stakes at both ends and set a string line 1" above your invert.  Two percent fall is good.




Base up to 1" below your string line.  You can use loose, friable soil, sand, or gravel.




Install the drain pipe.  Use PVC SDR 35 or Sch 40 PVC and glue everything together.




Center load the drain with your back fill first.  Compact the sides and be careful not to raise the pipe.




Back fill the top of the pipe and compact.  
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 8:02:27 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.

I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.
View Quote


Actually its the other way around use PVC unless you have extra time and money to redo the job because the corrugated pipe has collapsed and no longer carries  water.  
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 8:26:06 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:


Actually its the other way around use PVC unless you have extra time and money to redo the job because the corrugated pipe has collapsed and no longer carries  water.  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.

I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.


Actually its the other way around use PVC unless you have extra time and money to redo the job because the corrugated pipe has collapsed and no longer carries  water.  


No kidding.  Corrugated HDPE ( single wall ) has it's place, at the base of a foundation wall encapsulated in gravel or at a location that doesn't receive any traffic.  We've seen HDPE gutter drains collapse from something as heavy as a zero turn mower when the pipe is near the surface.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 9:30:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2015 9:30:56 PM EDT by w33b8t1]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By billhw1:


No kidding.  Corrugated HDPE ( single wall ) has it's place, at the base of a foundation wall encapsulated in gravel or at a location that doesn't receive any traffic.  We've seen HDPE gutter drains collapse from something as heavy as a zero turn mower when the pipe is near the surface.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By billhw1:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.

I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.


Actually its the other way around use PVC unless you have extra time and money to redo the job because the corrugated pipe has collapsed and no longer carries  water.  


No kidding.  Corrugated HDPE ( single wall ) has it's place, at the base of a foundation wall encapsulated in gravel or at a location that doesn't receive any traffic.  We've seen HDPE gutter drains collapse from something as heavy as a zero turn mower when the pipe is near the surface.


Lol, it will survive 8' down, but not 1'.

Anyway, if it is so shallow that you are worried about crushing the pipe then do some sort of landscaping to just let it drain on the surface.
Link Posted: 4/28/2015 3:24:50 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:


Lol, it will survive 8' down, but not 1'.

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Originally Posted By billhw1:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.

I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.


Actually its the other way around use PVC unless you have extra time and money to redo the job because the corrugated pipe has collapsed and no longer carries  water.  


No kidding.  Corrugated HDPE ( single wall ) has it's place, at the base of a foundation wall encapsulated in gravel or at a location that doesn't receive any traffic.  We've seen HDPE gutter drains collapse from something as heavy as a zero turn mower when the pipe is near the surface.


Lol, it will survive 8' down, but not 1'.



Yes, that's why I said it.

You took that personal and you shouldn't have because the comment was directed at the product but you didn't know that...  

Maybe HDPE has kicked me in the butt one too many times as a GC over the years.  Clients like it because it's cheap but I can tell you that there is no advantage to me when I have to go back and repair or replace a section..  Also worth mentioning, sod, shrub or tree roots often penetrate the joints.

When I can I'll post a pick of some HDPE dual wall, corrugated exterior with a smooth wall at the interior.  It collapsed with about nine inches of soil cover because someone drove a small pickup over it to deliver some shrubs.  It cost us about 3K for the repair plus lost profit that could have been made elsewhere.
Link Posted: 4/28/2015 4:45:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2015 4:54:06 PM EDT by w33b8t1]
I agree and disagree.

Drain time is super easy to install and doesn't require a straight elevation drop, just throw it in a hole to some extent.  Sure PVC would be nice, but it is a pain in the ass if you are trying to go just a certain depth and follow the surface grade.

But like I said earlier, if he is going so close to the surface he is worried then I would be looking at a gravel bed or some other landscaping feature to handle it.

Driving a truck over something wasn't in the OP's original functional spec. And if it was I wouldn't use anything shallow enough to feel the effect of the truck.  Therefore drain time would again be a good choice.

Either way, whatever.
Link Posted: 4/28/2015 11:12:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Dig trench, put drain tile in trench, on outlet area put so e gravel or large rocks to break up the flow.
I wouldn't use pvc unless you have extra time to waste.
View Quote

in areas where it freezes, like the OP's MO,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri#Climate
OP should use PVC and bury it far enough down to avoid frost heaving.

ar-jedi































Link Posted: 4/28/2015 11:35:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2015 11:35:58 PM EDT by w33b8t1]
Nice house.

I'm tapping out of this argument.

The pictures you show would not meet any frost depth even in New Mexico and if it does freeze it is going to freeze in the area around the transition from the downspout to the pvc.  Little to nothing of consequence will freeze in the actual drain.

But whatever.  I say use sch. 80 iron.  You know, cause you never know......
Link Posted: 4/28/2015 11:46:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/28/2015 11:46:28 PM EDT by ar-jedi]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By w33b8t1:
Nice house.

I'm tapping out of this argument.

The pictures you show would not meet any frost depth even in New Mexico and if it does freeze it is going to freeze in the area around the transition from the downspout to the pvc.  Little to nothing of consequence will freeze in the actual drain.

But whatever.  I say use sch. 80 iron.  You know, cause you never know......
View Quote


freezing the water in the drain and frost heaving the pipe are two different things.

plus schedule 20 sewer and drain pvc is dirt cheap.  
bell end means you just hammer them together with a rubber mallet.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/JM-eagle-4-in-x-10-ft-PVC-Sewer-and-Drain-Pipe-1610/202280933?N=5yc1vZbv13


ar-jedi
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 3:23:11 AM EDT
Just curious, I can't tell from the pics but did you use perforated pipe? If not why wrap it in fabric?

J-
Link Posted: 4/29/2015 8:18:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2015 8:22:26 PM EDT by ar-jedi]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Just curious, I can't tell from the pics but did you use perforated pipe? If not why wrap it in fabric?

J-
View Quote

good observation.

there are actually TWO pipes in that trench.  down at the bottom is a 3" perf'd tile drain sitting in stone and wrapped in the fabric.  this is to catch the water that is coming down the sloped front yard towards the house. then there is the solid drain pipe which is carrying the water from the three downspouts.  somewhere near the corner of the house, these two are coupled and a solid length carries the water off onto the edge of the creek.

it turns out that it is easier -- much easier -- to wrap both pipes with the fabric versus trying to wrap just the drain tile.

ETA
looking now at my pics you can see where i joined the two at the 22.5degree bend area.  and looking at the pics i probably got more fabric wrap than i needed because the high school kid i left in charge of the shovel when i went off to work one day didn't really know what he was doing...

ar-jedi

Link Posted: 4/30/2015 11:24:03 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:

good observation.

there are actually TWO pipes in that trench.  down at the bottom is a 3" perf'd tile drain sitting in stone and wrapped in the fabric.  this is to catch the water that is coming down the sloped front yard towards the house. then there is the solid drain pipe which is carrying the water from the three downspouts.  somewhere near the corner of the house, these two are coupled and a solid length carries the water off onto the edge of the creek.

it turns out that it is easier -- much easier -- to wrap both pipes with the fabric versus trying to wrap just the drain tile.

ETA
looking now at my pics you can see where i joined the two at the 22.5degree bend area.  and looking at the pics i probably got more fabric wrap than i needed because the high school kid i left in charge of the shovel when i went off to work one day didn't really know what he was doing...

ar-jedi

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ar-jedi:
Originally Posted By jjc155:
Just curious, I can't tell from the pics but did you use perforated pipe? If not why wrap it in fabric?

J-

good observation.

there are actually TWO pipes in that trench.  down at the bottom is a 3" perf'd tile drain sitting in stone and wrapped in the fabric.  this is to catch the water that is coming down the sloped front yard towards the house. then there is the solid drain pipe which is carrying the water from the three downspouts.  somewhere near the corner of the house, these two are coupled and a solid length carries the water off onto the edge of the creek.

it turns out that it is easier -- much easier -- to wrap both pipes with the fabric versus trying to wrap just the drain tile.

ETA
looking now at my pics you can see where i joined the two at the 22.5degree bend area.  and looking at the pics i probably got more fabric wrap than i needed because the high school kid i left in charge of the shovel when i went off to work one day didn't really know what he was doing...

ar-jedi


gotcha, good looking work too.

J-
Top Top