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4/1/2020 4:14:10 PM
4/1/2020 6:58:51 AM
Posted: 1/10/2005 5:16:50 AM EDT
OK, here's the deal:

We are probably not going to stay in this house more than 2-3 years at the most, and it is in a relatively "depressed" area.  But we do want to make it look nicer so that when it comes time to sell we can get something decent for it.  We just got new windows and are doing renovations inside, but nothing major.

So, I want to get vinyl siding, but don't need the soffit or fascia.  Our current siding is Asbestos shingle siding, and it is cracked and missing some in various places.  I really think instead of getting the house painted (I don't know how easy it would be to replace some of the damaged siding, don't think they make this stuff anymore) that getting some of the less expensive vinyl would at least make it look nice for at least the next few years until we sell it.

I got some estimates from some companies that use the much thicker, more expensive vinyl, and of course these guys have overhead, have to pay sales comissions to their salespeople, etc.  Estimates for the total job including soffit and fascia ran anywhere from $7500 to $11,000.

This for a rectangular 1400 square foot house, with a LOT of windows and half of the house is brick fascia (read - NOT a lot of vinyl is going to be needed).

Ideas, thoughts, opinions?
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:22:12 AM EDT
Did you say asbestos?  Is there a protocol (EPA) for removing it and disposing of it?  I would find out before you get into a huge problem.  Just a thought.

G23c
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:24:58 AM EDT
Not really an issue - a lot of asbestos siding is in this area, and all they do is side over it.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 5:30:03 AM EDT
I'd suggest going directly to a siding contractor, not a vynil siding company.  A contractor will still have access to the product without the overhead and mark-up.  The more expensive vynil siding is definitely worth it as it resists buckling much better than the cheaper stuff.  All of it will swell and contract with the seasons, but there really is a difference.  That's a real high price, have you considered a different material like Hardi-Plank or it's imitators?  
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 6:17:45 AM EDT
Hardiplank?  And yeah, we thought it was awful high - hell, we have about maybe 6 feet high on the parts of the house that have siding, and about a 25 foot width and 57 foot length on the house dimensions - and there are a LOT of windows that take up space, so it really shouldn't be that much material needed.
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