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11/20/2019 5:07:11 PM
Posted: 2/25/2006 11:05:56 AM EST
Things have been going pretty well at my new job, and I've made about all of the major purchases I want to make for the foreseeable future, so it's about time to start putting some money away. What do you guys recommend?

For background, I'm young and single, and looking to put away around a thousand a month or more. I'm already maxed out on my company's 401k and Discounted Stock Purchase Plan. I'm probably only going to be making this much money for a few years, so I'd like to have competitive long-term growth without too much risk. I'm also pretty busy in general, and I can't count on watching things on the internet every day. So, what directions should I be looking in?

Stocks? Mutual Funds? IRAs? Something else? Should I be looking for a good broker or investment advisor? Any other advice?
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 1:21:41 PM EST
Since it sounds like you don't want to be involved in the day2day management, I suggest you find a "fee-only" financial advisor. That is, they get paid only by you to advise you. Make sure they don't get kickbacks for putting you into specific investments. Your first question should be, "How do you get paid?"

If you don't want to drop the $$$ on this route, be prepared to spend some time doing research.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 5:06:20 AM EST
Fund your Roth IRA, best deal going. (4k this year and in fact, you can fund last years up to April 15th. So you could have 8k in just this year)
then you always want some non-retirement savings, so you can use it for whatever you need. I would find some good low cost mutual funds that meet your needs, then leave them alone.
I'm a value guy, but there are some excellent growth ones out there too.
split it up some so it balances.
You need to make sure that your OVERALL investments balance out. so, if you are investing risky long term in your 401k, then your non-retierment might be less risky.
Don't invest everything in the same thing.
Oh, and get rid of the stock purchase plan. Your job already depends on your company, don't make your savings do it too. If you get it at a discount, that's ok, just make sure you sell it immediately and invest the proceeds in something else.

Oh yes, making money and paying taxes is better than not making money.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 8:05:09 AM EST
Do you own your home? might want to consider buying a house when ( if ) the real estate market cools. Just my .02
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 8:15:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/26/2006 8:16:06 PM EST by fike]
At this point I have set aside a monthly investing budget that consists of 60% index and mutual funds and 40% stocks. Of those stocks half are (dividend paying)blue chips and half are riskier ventures that I buy cheap and hold long.

Link Posted: 2/27/2006 2:03:48 PM EST
I did buy a house, 15 year fixed mortgage at 5.5% with 10% down.

Our stock purchase plan is at a nice discount, IIRC. I'm currently planning on holding it for a while, since our company looks set to to pretty well in the next few years. But I'm not planning on making it my primary retirement saving or anything - I don't want to lose it all if someone pulls an Enron or something.

How should I be investing in stocks and mutual funds? Should I go through one of those investment websites, or a more full-service brokerage?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 3:04:10 AM EST
Since you are young, I would sugguest that you look into developing a DRIP portfolio. A DRIP is a dividend reinvestment plan. Do search on DRIP and you will find a couple newletters that outline what that is all about. I have enclosed some info that I got from somewhere thatt outline the benefits of drip investing. I would look into one of the drip newsletters.

One other thing that I highly recommend, take 5% of your funds available for investing and start accumulating physical gold in the form of gold bullion coins. It is a storehouse of wealth. Think about this In the early 1900's, $10 would buy you a suit of clothes of and ounce of gold, $10 today will not buy you a suit of clothes but an ounce of gold will buy you a suit of clothes today.

below taken from else where

Take a look at this example: Let's assume you purchase 1,000 shares of a stock with a share price of $10 (for a total initial investment of $10,000). Let's also assume that this stock offers a 9.4% annual dividend and steady +10% share price appreciation each and every year. Because this stock's growth rate (10%) exceeds its dividend yield (9.4%), it's only natural to assume that capital appreciation would play a more important role in the stock's total returns over the long haul -- right?

Well, if you thought this way, then you'd be dead wrong. Without dividends reinvested, after 30 years this $10K would turn into $344,581. That's a respectable gain, but you'd still end up with just 1,000 shares. With dividends reinvested for 30 years, however, that initial $10K would be worth over $2.5 million. Best of all, you'd own nearly 15,000 shares. At year #31, those 15,000 shares would be generating $242,900 in annual dividend payments alone!



The bottom line is that dividends matter big time. And reinvesting the dividends earned from high-yield stocks matters even more. As you can see from our example, when you invest in companies with abnormally high dividend yields, you can make staggering profits. In fact, your dividend check can eventually grow so large that it surpasses the original price you paid for the stock. The exhilaration of "lapping" your stock that way is a feeling you'll never forget.

Think about it: When you keep your interest payments in a bank savings account, earning interest on the interest income, you're able to compound your gains over time. In a sense, you end up getting a higher yield than if you had withdrawn each month's interest payment. In the same way, if you use your dividend payments to purchase additional shares, then your investment will grow and pay even more dividends over the long haul.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:18:24 AM EST
I am in the same general situation that you are in. I maxed out my 401k and my wife's IRA. I am am looking to put money in a Roth IRA for me, since I can still do that, and then into a 529 or coverdell (sp?) for my kids. We pay down quite a bit of debt. I know many don't advocate that and say you can do better in the market, but my wife and I like the freedom that comes from paying house loans and then my student loan. After that, it's debt free. We also put money into preparedness (food, fuel, etc.). As for the breakdown, I am following the advice of an article that I think is really good.

I'm going to post a reference to an article.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 9:21:21 PM EST
Bob Brinkers Market Timer. He has been right for the last 20 some years(issued sell signal before tech bust and buy signal March 2003 before the return of the "secular bear market". I only wish that I had been in the market in 2003 and listening to him. For 180 bucks a year you get a monthly newletter with 4 model portfolios that are fitted to your general investing goals. He is very smart. Sample his goods by listening to his radio show on Sat. and Sun on the AM side. Also, he is very into low fees for investing in index funds and no load mutual funds.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 11:01:16 AM EST
Your making plenty of money and you are investing in a 401k, why not take a higher risk approach with your extra money.

I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k. That money will be trapped and you might want it when you get married and have kids. My advice is to open a discount brokerage account (meaning no broker) with a money market mutual fund holding the cash you don't buy stocks with. This is an importand piece of advice I'm going to give you, don't forget--BROKER'S ARE LIARS!

They are in the business to make money for themselves and the company they work for. They want you to trade often because they get a commision. They want you to invest in whatever they are told by their company. The company uses the investers to make a profit on stocks they are interested in. While they may seem like good cheerleaders in a bull market, they will absolutely screw you when it comes to getting out. Investment adviser's are usually life-insurance salesmen in disguise. Be very careful.

It has been shown that monkeys and darts do as good a job of picking stocks as pros. I think the best strategy is to invest in companies whose product you like and in sectors you think will do well. For example, I buy gas at Chevron, so I bought their stock. I like Pepsi. I saw Sandisk was selling flash memory in Costco, etc. I wish I had bought Amazon when my instructor told the class to buy our textbook there years ago. Just check around the news a little to make sure the company is about to get sued or lose a contract or something. Try to get to where you have at least 10 stocks in different sectors. Buy on dips and sell half your stock when it doubles. Let the rest ride. Don't give up just because you get burned once and don't buy the stock that all the neighbors are talking about, because when the shoeshine boy gives stock tips, it's time to sell.

Right now the thing is global insecurity and a declining dollar. I'm heavily into mining and oil.

Good luck!



Link Posted: 3/4/2006 12:47:05 PM EST

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Your making plenty of money and you are investing in a 401k, why not take a higher risk approach with your extra money.

I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k. That money will be trapped and you might want it when you get married and have kids. My advice is to open a discount brokerage account (meaning no broker) with a money market mutual fund holding the cash you don't buy stocks with. This is an importand piece of advice I'm going to give you, don't forget--BROKER'S ARE LIARS!

They are in the business to make money for themselves and the company they work for. They want you to trade often because they get a commision. They want you to invest in whatever they are told by their company. The company uses the investers to make a profit on stocks they are interested in. While they may seem like good cheerleaders in a bull market, they will absolutely screw you when it comes to getting out. Investment adviser's are usually life-insurance salesmen in disguise. Be very careful.

It has been shown that monkeys and darts do as good a job of picking stocks as pros. I think the best strategy is to invest in companies whose product you like and in sectors you think will do well. For example, I buy gas at Chevron, so I bought their stock. I like Pepsi. I saw Sandisk was selling flash memory in Costco, etc. I wish I had bought Amazon when my instructor told the class to buy our textbook there years ago. Just check around the news a little to make sure the company is about to get sued or lose a contract or something. Try to get to where you have at least 10 stocks in different sectors. Buy on dips and sell half your stock when it doubles. Let the rest ride. Don't give up just because you get burned once and don't buy the stock that all the neighbors are talking about, because when the shoeshine boy gives stock tips, it's time to sell.

Right now the thing is global insecurity and a declining dollar. I'm heavily into mining and oil.

Good luck!



Kinda what I was thinking on the IRAs - I'm already dumping a good bit of money into the 401k, so I don't think I want to put even more money into something I won't be able to touch until retirement.

I may just get an account at one of the websites where you can trade online and try my hand with the stocks, as you describe.
Link Posted: 3/4/2006 2:23:12 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/5/2006 5:37:59 AM EST by James16688]

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Your making plenty of money and you are investing in a 401k, why not take a higher risk approach with your extra money.

I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k. That money will be trapped and you might want it when you get married and have kids. My advice is to open a discount brokerage account (meaning no broker) with a money market mutual fund holding the cash you don't buy stocks with. This is an importand piece of advice I'm going to give you, don't forget--BROKER'S ARE LIARS!

They are in the business to make money for themselves and the company they work for. They want you to trade often because they get a commision. They want you to invest in whatever they are told by their company. The company uses the investers to make a profit on stocks they are interested in. While they may seem like good cheerleaders in a bull market, they will absolutely screw you when it comes to getting out. Investment adviser's are usually life-insurance salesmen in disguise. Be very careful.

It has been shown that monkeys and darts do as good a job of picking stocks as pros. I think the best strategy is to invest in companies whose product you like and in sectors you think will do well. For example, I buy gas at Chevron, so I bought their stock. I like Pepsi. I saw Sandisk was selling flash memory in Costco, etc. I wish I had bought Amazon when my instructor told the class to buy our textbook there years ago. Just check around the news a little to make sure the company is about to get sued or lose a contract or something. Try to get to where you have at least 10 stocks in different sectors. Buy on dips and sell half your stock when it doubles. Let the rest ride. Don't give up just because you get burned once and don't buy the stock that all the neighbors are talking about, because when the shoeshine boy gives stock tips, it's time to sell.

Right now the thing is global insecurity and a declining dollar. I'm heavily into mining and oil.

Good luck!






Beware of anyone giving you advice making broad generalizations such as "LAWYERS ARE SCUM"..

As for an IRA, I strongly disagree with above poster - in fact, he's giving terrible advice.

401k and IRA are not the same thing nor does having one lessen the value or replace the purpose of the other.

If you are making under $95K in modified adjusted gross income, you can contribute to a Roth IRA.
You're funds are not "trapped" as is commonly mistaken for Roths. Your contributions/cost basis can be are fully withdrawn w/o penalty or tax - it is your earnings that would be taxed and penalized. Remember, your Roth contributions are from money that has already been taxed.

Beware of advice you receive on this forum. Do homework or hire a professional. Hey an opinion is fine, but not advice based on partial truths or ignorance.

Roth IRA

Link Posted: 3/4/2006 2:39:32 PM EST
If you file single and make less than $110k, you should reconsider your IRA vs. 401k strategy because you will qualify for a Roth IRA.

The Roth is great because you pay the tax up front and then your money grows tax free. With the 401k, you pay the tax when you withdraw the money. You saw how our elected officials want to deal with the looming Social Security issue right? Instead of fixing it now they refuse to touch it. Think taxes will be higher or lower in the future? Maybe this is a wash because you make a lot of money now and plan to live like a pauper when you retire and therefore you'll be in a lower tax rate. Not my plan however.

The Roth also gives you more choices--whatever you want vs. whatever your company's 401k has available. And there are less restrictions on when/how you withdraw the $$$ from the Roth.

I'm a financial-talk-show junkie and I've not heard a single reputable host differ from this strategy:

1) Fund your 401k up to the percentage of the employer match (if any).
2) Fund a Roth IRA (if eligible).
3) Fund your 401k.

If it makes sense, reduce your 401k contribution to free up money for the Roth. More info:

personal.fidelity.com/products/retirement/getstart/aboutira.shtml.cvsr
Link Posted: 3/4/2006 3:06:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By heavily_armed:
If you file single and make less than $110k, you should reconsider your IRA vs. 401k strategy because you will qualify for a Roth IRA.

The Roth is great because you pay the tax up front and then your money grows tax free. With the 401k, you pay the tax when you withdraw the money. You saw how our elected officials want to deal with the looming Social Security issue right? Instead of fixing it now they refuse to touch it. Think taxes will be higher or lower in the future? Maybe this is a wash because you make a lot of money now and plan to live like a pauper when you retire and therefore you'll be in a lower tax rate. Not my plan however.

The Roth also gives you more choices--whatever you want vs. whatever your company's 401k has available. And there are less restrictions on when/how you withdraw the $$$ from the Roth.

I'm a financial-talk-show junkie and I've not heard a single reputable host differ from this strategy:

1) Fund your 401k up to the percentage of the employer match (if any).
2) Fund a Roth IRA (if eligible).
3) Fund your 401k.

If it makes sense, reduce your 401k contribution to free up money for the Roth. More info:

personal.fidelity.com/products/retirement/getstart/aboutira.shtml.cvsr



+1
Link Posted: 3/4/2006 5:15:33 PM EST
buy low, sell high
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 5:00:50 AM EST
Hmm... Okay, so looks like Roth IRA money is not trapped until retirement. However, while I made less then $110k last year (2005), I will make more this year. So I guess that's a no go.
Link Posted: 3/5/2006 5:34:30 AM EST
If you have not filed for 2005 taxes yet, you can still make your 2005 contribution.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:26:59 AM EST
While I totally agree with the approach of funding 401k and a Roth IRA, it's ok too to have some non-retirement, taxable investments.
Retirement is great, but having all your net worth tied up in retirement is hard when you want th emoney for something else (buy a business, a house, whatever). it's ok to have some balance, some retirement, some non-retirement. Plus, you split the taxes. Some now, some when you retire.
having liquid assets at any point is time is a valuable asset.
definately fund your Roth for 2005, you can do that all the way up to april 15th.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 2:50:40 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/6/2006 2:51:17 PM EST by No_Serfing]

Originally Posted By James16688:

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Your making plenty of money and you are investing in a 401k, why not take a higher risk approach with your extra money.

I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k. That money will be trapped and you might want it when you get married and have kids. My advice is to open a discount brokerage account (meaning no broker) with a money market mutual fund holding the cash you don't buy stocks with. This is an importand piece of advice I'm going to give you, don't forget--BROKER'S ARE LIARS!

They are in the business to make money for themselves and the company they work for. They want you to trade often because they get a commision. They want you to invest in whatever they are told by their company. The company uses the investers to make a profit on stocks they are interested in. While they may seem like good cheerleaders in a bull market, they will absolutely screw you when it comes to getting out. Investment adviser's are usually life-insurance salesmen in disguise. Be very careful.

It has been shown that monkeys and darts do as good a job of picking stocks as pros. I think the best strategy is to invest in companies whose product you like and in sectors you think will do well. For example, I buy gas at Chevron, so I bought their stock. I like Pepsi. I saw Sandisk was selling flash memory in Costco, etc. I wish I had bought Amazon when my instructor told the class to buy our textbook there years ago. Just check around the news a little to make sure the company is about to get sued or lose a contract or something. Try to get to where you have at least 10 stocks in different sectors. Buy on dips and sell half your stock when it doubles. Let the rest ride. Don't give up just because you get burned once and don't buy the stock that all the neighbors are talking about, because when the shoeshine boy gives stock tips, it's time to sell.

Right now the thing is global insecurity and a declining dollar. I'm heavily into mining and oil.

Good luck!






Beware of anyone giving you advice making broad generalizations such as "LAWYERS ARE SCUM"..

As for an IRA, I strongly disagree with above poster - in fact, he's giving terrible advice.

401k and IRA are not the same thing nor does having one lessen the value or replace the purpose of the other.

If you are making under $95K in modified adjusted gross income, you can contribute to a Roth IRA.
You're funds are not "trapped" as is commonly mistaken for Roths. Your contributions/cost basis can be are fully withdrawn w/o penalty or tax - it is your earnings that would be taxed and penalized. Remember, your Roth contributions are from money that has already been taxed.

Beware of advice you receive on this forum. Do homework or hire a professional. Hey an opinion is fine, but not advice based on partial truths or ignorance.

Roth IRA





Citigroup settles Worldcom lawsuit for $2.65B
The Business Review (Albany) - May 10, 2004by Eric DurrThe Business Review
Print this Article Email this Article Reprints RSS Feeds Most Viewed Most Emailed
Citigroup has agreed to a $2.65 billion settlement with New York Comptroller Alan Hevesi's office to settle the Worldcom Class Action lawsuit.

Hevesi is the lead plaintiff in the lawsuit, and is the sole trustee of the New York State Common Retirement Fund which is valued at $118 billion.

Hevesi made the announcement May 10, the day the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit was due to hear arguments in the case.

Hevesi and the Securities and Exchange Commission argued that analysts like Jack Grubman, who worked for Citigroup brokerage unit Salomon Smith Barney, promoted Worldcom securities even though they knew the company was in trouble in order to secure business for their company. Investors who relied on his reports lost money based on false claims, the lawsuit argued.

http://www.bizjournals.com/albany/stories/2004/05/10/daily9.html



Beware of the mantra! Definitely do your own research.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 3:41:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Originally Posted By James16688:
Originally Posted By No_Serfing:


Beware of the mantra! Definitely do your own research.



What mantra?

And I guess your still trying to say brokers are "liars" with an example of corporate malfeasance?

Well, by that logic one could also say the U.S. soldiers are "baby killers" with an example of My Lai?

To the original poster, sorry to hi-jack. I have to call out faulty logic backing misstatements like "I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k." and "Brokers [edit] are liars", especially in this forum.

Link Posted: 3/7/2006 7:07:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By James16688:

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Originally Posted By James16688:
Originally Posted By No_Serfing:


Beware of the mantra! Definitely do your own research.



What mantra?

And I guess your still trying to say brokers are "liars" with an example of corporate malfeasance?

Well, by that logic one could also say the U.S. soldiers are "baby killers" with an example of My Lai?

To the original poster, sorry to hi-jack. I have to call out faulty logic backing misstatements like "I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k." and "Brokers [edit] are liars", especially in this forum.




The "put your money in retirement savings" mantra or whatever the current advice advisers give to everybody is. People need to think for themselves. Every pamphlet I get from anybody says "put your money in a Roth IRA". It's because they want you to give them your money and leave it there for a long time. One must pay close attention to the fine print that says "past results are not an indicator of future performance" and consider it will be maybe 40 years until you retire which will have all of the baby boomers retiring first and withdrawing money from their IRAs and 401ks. I'm just not sure I want any money going there that isn't being matched by an employer.

Your analogy about Viet Nam is rediculous. The Solomon Smith Barney lie affected many investors for billions of dollars. All of their brokers were passing on the lie. The lie was this "Buy Worldcom. They have great management." The truth was "Bernie Ebbers is destroying Worldcom." They knew it.

Since you are so touchy about the issue, I will qualify my statement. BROKERS ARE NOTHING BUT SALESMEN WHO DO THE BIDDING OF THE COMPANY THEY WORK FOR, WHICH PROBABLY HAS A CONFLICT OF INTEREST, AND ARE THEREFORE NOT TO BE TRUSTED SINCE THEY WILL PASS ON WHATEVER LIES MIGHT BE TOLD BY SENIOR MANAGEMENT WHETHER THEY KNOW THE TRUTH OR NOT. So it's really more like being a Hitler Youth in Nazi Germany than like My Lai.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 2:57:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:

Originally Posted By James16688:

Originally Posted By No_Serfing:
Originally Posted By James16688:
Originally Posted By No_Serfing:


Beware of the mantra! Definitely do your own research.



What mantra?

And I guess your still trying to say brokers are "liars" with an example of corporate malfeasance?

Well, by that logic one could also say the U.S. soldiers are "baby killers" with an example of My Lai?

To the original poster, sorry to hi-jack. I have to call out faulty logic backing misstatements like "I advise against putting it in an IRA, since you already have the 401k." and "Brokers [edit] are liars", especially in this forum.




The "put your money in retirement savings" mantra or whatever the current advice advisers give to everybody is. People need to think for themselves. Every pamphlet I get from anybody says "put your money in a Roth IRA". It's because they want you to give them your money and leave it there for a long time. One must pay close attention to the fine print that says "past results are not an indicator of future performance" and consider it will be maybe 40 years until you retire which will have all of the baby boomers retiring first and withdrawing money from their IRAs and 401ks. I'm just not sure I want any money going there that isn't being matched by an employer.

Your analogy about Viet Nam is rediculous. The Solomon Smith Barney lie affected many investors for billions of dollars. All of their brokers were passing on the lie. The lie was this "Buy Worldcom. They have great management." The truth was "Bernie Ebbers is destroying Worldcom." They knew it.

Since you are so touchy about the issue, I will qualify my statement. BROKERS ARE NOTHING BUT SALESMEN WHO DO THE BIDDING OF THE COMPANY THEY WORK FOR, WHICH PROBABLY HAS A CONFLICT OF INTEREST, AND ARE THEREFORE NOT TO BE TRUSTED SINCE THEY WILL PASS ON WHATEVER LIES MIGHT BE TOLD BY SENIOR MANAGEMENT WHETHER THEY KNOW THE TRUTH OR NOT. So it's really more like being a Hitler Youth in Nazi Germany than like My Lai.



Okay, we'll agree to disagree on the nature of brokers in general.

However, you are still dead wrong on Roths. You are ignorant about the power of tax-deferral, IRA basics, and harbor some misconceptions about investing. Keep an open mind and read some more.

IRA's, Taxes, Investments
etc.
Smartmoney.com
Financial Planning


Link Posted: 3/14/2006 9:04:23 PM EST
Investing can be pretty simple and inexpensive. Call or go online at Vanguard. Pick a fund (I like index ones). Set it up and forget it.

If you're busy and don't know much about investing, forget the brokers and individual stocks. Mutual funds, while not perfect, seem like the best way to go for you. YMMV
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 2:50:47 PM EST
Mace, you can take up to $10K for first time home buy, so it may be wise to open a roth for this purpose alone, but I agree with you, don't over contribute to the roth at this stage in your life, as long as you're matching your company's 401K match.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 3:36:20 PM EST

Originally Posted By GunRunnr1:
Mace, you can take up to $10K for first time home buy, so it may be wise to open a roth for this purpose alone, but I agree with you, don't over contribute to the roth at this stage in your life, as long as you're matching your company's 401K match.



Poor advice based on ignorance again.

You should max out ROTH while you can because:

1. For 2005, contribution phase-outs begin at $95K adjusted gross income for single filers, meaning if you have greater than $95K (income) you can not even put a single dime into a ROTH. Hopefully, there will be a time where you do not qualify for a Roth IRA contribution, and at that time, you will regret not maxing out when you did qualify.

2. All Roth contributions are after-tax and therefore your contributions/cost basis can be withdrawn at anytime, free of penalty and tax. Only non-qualified distributions of earnings would penalized and taxed.

Roth IRA
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 9:47:14 PM EST

Originally Posted By mace:
Things have been going pretty well at my new job, and I've made about all of the major purchases I want to make for the foreseeable future, so it's about time to start putting some money away. What do you guys recommend?

For background, I'm young and single, and looking to put away around a thousand a month or more. I'm already maxed out on my company's 401k and Discounted Stock Purchase Plan. I'm probably only going to be making this much money for a few years, so I'd like to have competitive long-term growth without too much risk. I'm also pretty busy in general, and I can't count on watching things on the internet every day. So, what directions should I be looking in?

Stocks? Mutual Funds? IRAs? Something else? Should I be looking for a good broker or investment advisor? Any other advice?



this may sound silly, but you do have ALL your credit cards paid off, right? any other debt?

Link Posted: 4/16/2006 10:28:08 PM EST
My simpliest advice is to talk with Financial advisor and invest as much as possible. Try to use little of your investment money on a tax free investment vehicle like ROTH IRA and rest in regular short term MM to invest.
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