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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/4/2005 6:26:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 6:33:15 AM EDT by Leisure_Shoot]
I am planning on stripping and re-blueing a milsurp Turk M38 Rifle.
I have ordered virtually the whole line of Birchwood Casey blueing/stripping/prep solution, etc...
This is merely to experiment on a trashed Mauser.
I really want to refinish a 98K eventually.

I really want to achieve a dark black finish.
I understand hot-bluing is the best method.
I am willing to give that a try, if it is just a matter of some chemicals and a large dipping tank for the barrel.

Can I get some pointers on what direction I need to go to accomplish this job professionally?[
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:12:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 7:13:47 AM EDT by topknot]
I've only done the cold re-bluing as described at surplusrifle.com.

Surplus Rifle.com Cold Rebluing instructions
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:29:58 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 7:31:05 AM EDT by Leisure_Shoot]
How were the results?
Was it lasting?

From their pictures, it doesn't look very "deep" and it looks pretty blue.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:45:51 AM EDT
It will cost you about $500-800 to tool up to do a hot-blue. Lots easier and cheaper ($150-200) to take it to a gunsmith. If you want to do it at home, investigate rust-blueing. All you need is one tank, some way to heat water in the tank, a soft steelbrush/steel wool, rust-bluing solution and about 3-4 days. I have a tank made by a local sheet metal shop, others have rigged one up from seamless metal gutter. I personally like Laurel Mountain Forge Browning Solution; it comes with good directions.

I can almost guarentee that you will be disappointed by trying to cold-blue your rifle. Cold blues are really meant to touch up worn areas and scratches, and just will not wear as long as a hot or rust-blue.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:48:40 AM EDT
Hey Leisure! About a year ago I refinished a Turk Mauser with great results using the Birchwood Casey cold blueing stuff. Don't use the wood refinishing stuff, they have this stuff that has linseed oil in it but it seals the wood. I ended up using Boiled linseed oil and Tung Oil to give it a true mil finish. I'll email you some pics if you would like to see the finished product.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:50:50 AM EDT
Birchwood-Casey products for cold blueing are intended for touch up work. You will probably not have much luck or a very nice overall uniform finish with cold blue. Pay someone to hot tank it for you. The tanks alone for hot blue cost about $75 to $100 each. You need a minimum of 3 tanks and 4 makes the process work better. The chemicals are quite expensive as well. Brownells sells a minimum qequipment and chemical set for $1000 plus shipping. Charles the Gunsmith.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:53:24 AM EDT
I've had good luck with Van's 44/40 from Brownells.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 7:58:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 7:59:29 AM EDT by Leisure_Shoot]
Thanks for the replies, guys.
I will look for a gunsmith to reblue for me.

Tazaroo, I'd like to see your Turk Mauser.
Here's one I got from aimsurplus for $89. Feels like I stole it at that price.


I bought a new stock for my beat up one, and plan to have it blued so it is just as nice.

I also have a 98K that I have refinished the stock, and plan to have the metal refinished.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 8:07:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Chas:
It will cost you about $500-800 to tool up to do a hot-blue. Lots easier and cheaper ($150-200) to take it to a gunsmith. If you want to do it at home, investigate rust-blueing. All you need is one tank, some way to heat water in the tank, a soft steelbrush/steel wool, rust-bluing solution and about 3-4 days. I have a tank made by a local sheet metal shop, others have rigged one up from seamless metal gutter. I personally like Laurel Mountain Forge Browning Solution; it comes with good directions.

I can almost guarentee that you will be disappointed by trying to cold-blue your rifle. Cold blues are really meant to touch up worn areas and scratches, and just will not wear as long as a hot or rust-blue.



Exactly I 2nd all the above . Cold blue Isn't for doing an entire rifle .....BUT if thats what you are going to do use a little heat on the steel , I dont know how you can keep it even and uniform , maybe an oven ? Use several coats , you'll know why after the first one .

Browning would be a good option (espeisaly if you want to refinish an old double shotgun .)
Ive got a bottle of supposedly the best stuff downstairs , I'd tell you what it is but I dont remember offhand and you already got Birchwood C .....good luck

A "Turk M 38" we aren't talking short Nagent here are we ? cause if you got one ..... , must be a somr thing else . BUT IF somehow you are talking Nagent I wouldnt do a thing to it .

Link Posted: 8/4/2005 8:48:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 8:49:09 AM EDT by topknot]
It (cold bluing) has been fine on my Gewehr 98 who's barrel was down to shiny bare metal when I got it.

Took it out in the weather last year for deer hunting and the bluing still looks like the day I did it.

The more coats/reptetitions that you do with the bluing, the darker the results.

Do you want a showpiece or a functional protected shooter? If it's the latter, then cold bluing is how I'd go. Otherwise you'll spend more on hot bluing than the rifle is worth.

IMO, of course.
Link Posted: 8/4/2005 8:55:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/4/2005 8:57:48 AM EDT by 223-4me]
I just put the Birchwood/casey crap on my Turk mauser and I think you should go with somthing a little tougher, take it to a gunsmith for the hot blue. I put about eight coats of the cold blue over each part and they still didnt come out dark enough, also dont put it on your bolt, I just did that yesterday and after cycling it about 10 time the finish is already stripped off in some places also for some reason my rear site and the barrel band would only turn a light grey color even though they got the same amount of coats as the other parts.
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