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Posted: 1/11/2005 5:37:07 AM EDT
I picked up an old Colt Official Police .38spl with a 6" barrel.  It's a "gunsmith's special" and only ran me $75 *including tax.*

One of the first things I note is that one of the three main screws appears to be melded on to the frame because of rust.  I suspect this is a steel screw on a steel frame.  This screw will need to be removed eventually.  :-)

What is the best way to remove a stubborn screw?  Is there a solvent that you prefer?

Thanks much!

Mike
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 5:37:48 AM EDT
Try some WD-40 first.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 5:59:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/11/2005 6:00:48 AM EDT by DOW]

Spray some on the stuck screw. Tap with wood/plastic/rubber mallet or whatever. Spray and tap, spray and tap. Repeat this over time, and be patient.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 5:59:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Researcher:
Try some WD-40 first.



or some Krell's.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:02:53 AM EDT
I'd soak with Kroil for a couple of hours before even attemptimg removal.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:03:40 AM EDT
penetrating oils like liquid wrench or heat can damage the bluing.
You might want to try mineral spirits.

Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:05:55 AM EDT
you could get a dremel with a bronse brush and remove the rust with that, then try some penetrating oil... yet there is a chance that it may damag the Bluing...

Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:08:23 AM EDT
Man........I expected something WAY different from that title..........continue.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:15:39 AM EDT
tell her you're broke. She'll be gone in two weeks
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:19:15 AM EDT
Sears sells a stripped screw removal tool (advertised by Bob Villa).  It works wonders and can open ANY stripped, rusted, rotten etc screw.  Definately worth the purchase price.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:22:30 AM EDT
Coca Cola..oops, wrong thread.

PB Blaster!
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:31:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Skunkeye:
I'd soak with Kroil for a couple of hours before even attemptimg removal.



+1

Kroil's great stuff.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:34:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Nozzleman:
PB Blaster!



+1 for PB Blaster.  Nothing works better on stuck threads, in my experience.  

And when you're ready to take the screw out, make sure you use a screwdriver that fits the slot perfectly!  (width and length)  This will give you maximum torque and minimize the possibility of damaging the screw head.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:39:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fizassist:

Originally Posted By Nozzleman:
PB Blaster!



+1 for PB Blaster.  Nothing works better on stuck threads, in my experience.  

And when you're ready to take the screw out, make sure you use a screwdriver that fits the slot perfectly!  (width and length)  This will give you maximum torque and minimize the possibility of damaging the screw head.



To everyone:  Thank you for the suggestions.  I won't need to worry about damaging the blue- I figure the bluing would rate around 10-15%-- in a dark room.    I'm more worried about damaging the steel itself which brings me to...

Fizassist:  The screw is already slightly buggered from using a screwdriver half the length of the screw's slot.  There are scratches on the frame from the screwdriver slipping around also.  

To everyone (again):  Any recommendations on ways to work out or lessen the perceived depth of the scratches?

Thanks and keep it coming!

Mike
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:42:57 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:44:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dvr9:
Sears sells a stripped screw removal tool (advertised by Bob Villa).  It works wonders and can open ANY stripped, rusted, rotten etc screw.  Definately worth the purchase price.





Screw out

Then buy new screws since they are already damaged.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:49:10 AM EDT
It didn't take a couple of minutes for the screw to seize up in the first place, so don't expect it to come out in a short amount of time either.  Just soak it and give it some time.  Be patient and give the oil some time to work and you'll be just fine.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 6:53:34 AM EDT
you been talking to my wife?
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 7:02:18 AM EDT
After soaking a day in PB Blaster, I'd use a small hammer driven impact wrench.  These usually come with 4-6 different sized screwdriver bits.  (It also has a 1/2" square drive for sockets).  Select the proper sized bit and gently tap the impact driver until loosened, being careful to not bugger the slot even more.

This is how I'd do it, short of drilling the head out and getting nasty with it.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 7:52:21 AM EDT
I have a tool used for just such a task.  It's a manual impact driver.  You put the appropriate screw driver bit in the end, place the bit in the screw and smack the driver with a hammer.

Here is such a tool.

I got mine at Sears.

If you go this route, lube it up with PB Blaster several times and let it soak overnight.   Make sure the slot in the screw is totally clean so that the bit fits all of the way down in properly.   Keep the driver square to the screw and give it a rap.  

You will have to find some way to secure the pistol for this to be successful.

Good Luck
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:06:20 AM EDT
Use the tool described above, along with KROIL and heat.

Kroil is the best penetrating oil, period.

I would apply Kroil and wait a day or two before even trying to turn the screw.  Apply more kroil as it is sucked into the threads.

If needed, use a pencil torch to apply heat to the screw.

Take your time and it will break loose.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:12:21 AM EDT
word of warning...I've snapped a few bolts on my Jeep w/ an impact driver. I've stopped using it on anything other than grade 8 hardware.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:20:08 AM EDT
Soak the screw with penetrating oil for as long as you can stand, several days.

Before you try an impact driver, use a conventional screwdriver that fits the screw slot as closely as possible, apply as much torque as you can, then tap the screwdriver handle with a light hammer.  Aviation tool catalogs sell a specialty tool that works this way except it has a short handle for applying torque.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:23:47 AM EDT
Strike Hold works wonders.
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 8:48:46 AM EDT
Wow-- thanks for the info!  Looks like it's time to hit Sears too.  

I've heard of Kroil and know where to get it, but this PB Blaster is new-- where is it available?

Thanks!

Mike
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 9:29:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By prebans:
Wow-- thanks for the info!  Looks like it's time to hit Sears too.  

I've heard of Kroil and know where to get it, but this PB Blaster is new-- where is it available?

Thanks!

Mike



I've used both - Kroil is better!



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