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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 2/28/2006 6:45:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/1/2006 6:25:39 AM EDT by armoredsaint]
I have a Whirpool Accudry dehumidifier, it's about 6 years old and the sides of the machine has some heavy condensation, I never seen it do that before. Is it broken?

I run it 24/7 in the basement always. Thanks.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:49:31 PM EDT
My nose is dry as hell right now, and you're running a dehumidifier?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:51:34 PM EDT
It has most likely got a plugged filter if it had one or it's running low on refrigerant.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:52:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
My nose is dry as hell right now, and you're running a dehumidifier?



it's a new build house and it's only in the basement, it gets plenty of water too
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:55:10 PM EDT
Yep, check the filter first and make sure it's clean.

Also, if your basement slopes on an angle, try changing the orientation of the dehumidifier so the end with the coil faces towards the downslope. I had one that had a problem draining the condensation - the water would collect towards the inside of the machine and then freeze from the condenser coils. When I turned it around, it drained fast enough that it didn't have time to freeze.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:55:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
My nose is dry as hell right now, and you're running a dehumidifier?



it's a new build house and it's only in the basement, it gets plenty of water too



Are the walls bare, or have you applied sealing paint?

Link Posted: 2/28/2006 6:58:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bastiat:

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
My nose is dry as hell right now, and you're running a dehumidifier?



it's a new build house and it's only in the basement, it gets plenty of water too



Are the walls bare, or have you applied sealing paint?




it's just bare walls and unfinished, there is waterproofing applied called tuff n dri if i remember the name.
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 7:00:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ZW17:
It has most likely got a plugged filter if it had one or it's running low on refrigerant.



thanks, i assume the filter is an in-line type of filter?
Link Posted: 2/28/2006 7:12:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:

Originally Posted By ZW17:
It has most likely got a plugged filter if it had one or it's running low on refrigerant.



thanks, i assume the filter is an in-line type of filter?



It will be a little 1/4" thick woven fiber type filter. Check on the front of the machine under the control panel, you will be looking for a tab or two and it pulls out. Think about where the air goes into the machine and that is where you will look for the filter.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 6:27:11 AM EDT
UPDATED: I took the thing apart and I was surprised to see the front coils/radiator all frosted up badly, what could that mean? And I checked for a filter, but nothing. The rear coils/radiator is normal. Help!
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 6:40:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By armoredsaint:
UPDATED: I took the thing apart and I was surprised to see the front coils/radiator all frosted up badly, what could that mean? And I checked for a filter, but nothing. The rear coils/radiator is normal. Help!



I don't think it is uncommon for this to happen.

It happened to my window air conditioners, as well as two dehumidifiers I've owned.

It is usually a result of the ambiant air temperature being too cold.

The dehumidifier was designed to balance the cooling effect of the evaporator coils
such that it will condense moisture, but not freeze. If the room temp is too low,
it won't keep those coils warm enough to prevent freezing.

I noticed that when my dehumidifier freezes up, it will run forever because once the coils freeze
up, it isn't extracting moisture like it should, so the room's humidity doesn't go down.
Obviously these units are dumb, and they should have been made with a thermostat on the
coils to shut it off if it gets too cold. (ices up)

You need to either raise the temperature of the room, or allow the relative humidity
to go up some.
Link Posted: 3/1/2006 7:03:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/1/2006 7:20:03 AM EDT by dablues]


The dehumidifier was designed to balance the cooling effect of the evaporator coils
such that it will condense moisture, but not freeze. If the room temp is too low,
it won't keep those coils warm enough to prevent freezing.



I had the same problem with the coils icing up. My solution was to get a heavy duty 24 hour timer, the kind that turns on and off at different times. I set the timer to run two hours and off for two hours.

That worked well for a number of years.

Follow on, the old dehumidifier finally died the death, and I replaced it with a model from Home Depot that has a low temp ability. The unit was about $220 IIRC. It uses a flash defrost by reversing the gas flow, so hot side gasses flow through the condenser for a couple minutes and then it goes back to normal operation. My basement gets as cold as 40 degrees in the winter, but it's still damp, so I need dehumidification down there even in winter, or the house smells musty.

I can't seal the walls, it's a 100 year old farmhouse with loose laid rock walls.
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