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7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 8/31/2015 6:36:01 PM EDT
As you can see in the photo the housing on my parent's pool pump has sprung a couple of pinhole leaks first it was one, now two more in the same area

Is this the outer housing itself that has worn (UV rays over the years) or is there a broken gasket between the leak and the pump to the right? (I suspect there is).

What's a short-term solution to plugging this leak?

What's the long term solution?

Someone at the hardware store said a "wet" epoxy kit (automotive) should work as a short term solution. I think it's some kind of impregnated fiberglass tape.

Gotta fix this leak pronto.

Link Posted: 8/31/2015 6:47:03 PM EDT
Trouble free pool . Com is the Arf of pools.
A seal/rebuild kit and probably a new motor and impeller would bring life back for years to come. Don't epoxy it, get the right seal kit.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 6:53:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2015 6:55:42 PM EDT by ZedsDeadBaby]
Thats a hayward superpump, and if it is leaking from there then the housing is cracked.

You need a new pump and motor.

I only say you need a motor because that one looks like crap, and the bearings are probably shot too.

What is the volume of your pool?

If you buy a complete pump and motor its cheaper. About 350 bucks for a 1 HP. they are easy to install if you can do some basic electrical and PVC plumbing.

Turn the pump off and get a pic of where the leak is. If you were local I would help you out for a beer or two.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:00:49 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ZedsDeadBaby:
Thats a hayward superpump, and if it is leaking from there then the housing is cracked.

You need a new pump and motor.

I only say you need a motor because that one looks like crap, and the bearings are probably shot too.

What is the volume of your pool?

If you buy a complete pump and motor its cheaper. About 350 bucks for a 1 HP. they are easy to install if you can do some basic electrical and PVC plumbing.

Turn the pump off and get a pic of where the leak is. If you were local I would help you out for a beer or two.
View Quote

HIghlighted line is all you really need to read.  That pump/filter looks like it's had a long, hard life... let it pass with some dignity, and save yourself a lot of headaches (and eventually $) by replacing it.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 7:26:31 PM EDT
New wet end seal kit and motor at a minimum. Might be better to replace with a complete pump, while you are at it that filter has about had it.  sooner or later it is going to start leaking.  

Me personally I like Pentair pumps over hayward super pumps.  the main reason is if leaves and such get around the pad it can be harder to see if the seal kit is leaking.  the hayward super pump sits really low.
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:20:20 PM EDT
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I pretty much already knew that the pump and motor would have to be replaced. Hell, I wouldn't cry if they replaced the entire pump/filter with a salt water unit.

BUT IN THE MEANTIME.....

Until we get it replaced what can I use to try to seal off off that leak on the outside? Is that cracked housing poly? Or Fiberglass?
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:22:01 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ThePontificator:
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I pretty much already knew that the pump and motor would have to be replaced. Hell, I wouldn't cry if they replaced the entire pump/filter with a salt water unit.

BUT IN THE MEANTIME.....

Until we get it replaced what can I use to try to seal off off that leak on the outside? Is that cracked housing poly? Or Fiberglass?
View Quote



JB Weld should work....
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 8:30:51 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Backnblack:



JB Weld should work....
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Backnblack:
Originally Posted By ThePontificator:
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I pretty much already knew that the pump and motor would have to be replaced. Hell, I wouldn't cry if they replaced the entire pump/filter with a salt water unit.

BUT IN THE MEANTIME.....

Until we get it replaced what can I use to try to seal off off that leak on the outside? Is that cracked housing poly? Or Fiberglass?



JB Weld should work....


That's what was suggested as a stop-gap by two buddies here in town
Link Posted: 8/31/2015 9:06:52 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ThePontificator:
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah, I pretty much already knew that the pump and motor would have to be replaced. Hell, I wouldn't cry if they replaced the entire pump/filter with a salt water unit.

BUT IN THE MEANTIME.....

Until we get it replaced what can I use to try to seal off off that leak on the outside? Is that cracked housing poly? Or Fiberglass?
View Quote



Not Salt water, its salt chlorine.

JB weld should work, but you have to drain the housing and dry it out. Unscrew the plug in the front of the H/L pot, and the one in the volute.
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 4:38:16 AM EDT
Keep an eye out on Craigslist... end of summer, some folks decide the pool was a mistake or just want it gone for whatever reason.  I've seen a number of pool packages free if you come drain, disassemble, and haul the thing off.  Pumps and filters turn up pretty regularly.

Wish you were closer.  I've got one of those filter housings I'd give you if there was a way to get it to you that didn't cost more than the housing itself was worth.

Anybody on their way to SC via MO?  
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 5:38:36 AM EDT
converting to salt chlorine still requires the filter and pump.  it is an additional part of the equipment.  If you are wishing to do this please do a lot of research.  there is a lot of misinformation out there about salt chlorine units and pool chemistry.

the way they work is based on your unit manufacturers recommendations you add a certain amount of salt to reach 3000 to 4000 parts per million, again depending on the manufacturers recommendation for their unit.  Converting to salt chlorine does not completely negate the possible need to use trichlor and or shock as a boosting effect, especially during the hottest part of the summer.  Also contrary to really bad information, one still has to maintain the other chemicals, Total Hardness, PH, Alkalinity, Stabilizer, as well as monitor Phosphate levels.  these being correct actually become more necessary in a slat chlorine pool in order to maintain a chlorine residue, and to keep from damaging or destroying the salt cell.

As the salt in the water passes over the energized cell, thru electrolysis it converts that salt to a type of chlorine.  most related to liquid shock.  this is not a long lasting chlorine, which is why the cell is constantly converting, after a short period of time, dependent on temperature and environment that chlorine turns back to salt, thus repeating the process while the pump is running.  the salt is not consumed in this process.  Also if one converts to salt chlorine, understand that if one puts salt in the pool and turns the generator on, without an already present chlorine residue, the generator will not be able to produce chlorine.  it will try, but it needs to have an already present chlorine level in order to "take over" the chlorine production.

Personally I have used and installed salt generators from Pentair, Jandy, Aquacal and SGS.  My least favorite is Aquacal, they are a good generator, but their boards are way to susceptible to shorting out.  the pentair system is pretty straight forward, and if there is a problem it usually means the cell needs to be replaced.  the Jandy aquapure is good but there have been issues with a bad batch of sensors.  My personal favorite from a technician standpoint is the SGS.  over 2 years of installing these and I have never had to trouble shoot one installed on a residential system.  The only failure I had was on a commercial pool and SGS replaced it pretty quickly.  i also like it because you can actually see the cell in its housing and can see when it needs to be cleaned.

just my $.02

Link Posted: 9/1/2015 6:25:18 PM EDT
Friday afternoon repair throw some dirt in the skimmer

I KID YOU NOT and don't turn the pump off, or you will have to do it again
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 6:38:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 10:44:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/1/2015 10:45:18 PM EDT by chrisp929]
You have positive pressure in the form of water clearly passing through a crack at the seam where the two plastic pieces are welded together at the factory. I personally doubt jb weld or anything else will work at all. If they do, it will be for minutes, maybe hours. I don't see any temporary fix of any kind working. Junk it like others said, buy a used one on clist or new online or locally. And like the rest have said, get a pump/motor combo, the motor has had it.

It's dead Jim.
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 11:00:45 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ZW17:
With water spraying right on that 120v or 220v motor, I hope like hell that your grounding/GFI system is up to snuff.

I would shut it down if it was mine.
View Quote


Fuck the ground you want the bond

And  I see it running right pass that pump to some where else so we have potential
Link Posted: 9/1/2015 11:00:50 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By garyd:
converting to salt chlorine still requires the filter and pump.  it is an additional part of the equipment.  If you are wishing to do this please do a lot of research.  there is a lot of misinformation out there about salt chlorine units and pool chemistry.

the way they work is based on your unit manufacturers recommendations you add a certain amount of salt to reach 3000 to 4000 parts per million, again depending on the manufacturers recommendation for their unit.  Converting to salt chlorine does not completely negate the possible need to use trichlor and or shock as a boosting effect, especially during the hottest part of the summer.  Also contrary to really bad information, one still has to maintain the other chemicals, Total Hardness, PH, Alkalinity, Stabilizer, as well as monitor Phosphate levels.  these being correct actually become more necessary in a slat chlorine pool in order to maintain a chlorine residue, and to keep from damaging or destroying the salt cell.

As the salt in the water passes over the energized cell, thru electrolysis it converts that salt to a type of chlorine.  most related to liquid shock.  this is not a long lasting chlorine, which is why the cell is constantly converting, after a short period of time, dependent on temperature and environment that chlorine turns back to salt, thus repeating the process while the pump is running.  the salt is not consumed in this process.  Also if one converts to salt chlorine, understand that if one puts salt in the pool and turns the generator on, without an already present chlorine residue, the generator will not be able to produce chlorine.  it will try, but it needs to have an already present chlorine level in order to "take over" the chlorine production.

Personally I have used and installed salt generators from Pentair, Jandy, Aquacal and SGS.  My least favorite is Aquacal, they are a good generator, but their boards are way to susceptible to shorting out.  the pentair system is pretty straight forward, and if there is a problem it usually means the cell needs to be replaced.  the Jandy aquapure is good but there have been issues with a bad batch of sensors.  My personal favorite from a technician standpoint is the SGS.  over 2 years of installing these and I have never had to trouble shoot one installed on a residential system.  The only failure I had was on a commercial pool and SGS replaced it pretty quickly.  i also like it because you can actually see the cell in its housing and can see when it needs to be cleaned.

just my $.02

View Quote


I just replaced my Aquapuer generator this summer because the cells are no longer available.  Put in a Pentair and have been pleased with it so far.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 5:26:44 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mohawk17:


I just replaced my Aquapuer generator this summer because the cells are no longer available.  Put in a Pentair and have been pleased with it so far.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mohawk17:
Originally Posted By garyd:
converting to salt chlorine still requires the filter and pump.  it is an additional part of the equipment.  If you are wishing to do this please do a lot of research.  there is a lot of misinformation out there about salt chlorine units and pool chemistry.

the way they work is based on your unit manufacturers recommendations you add a certain amount of salt to reach 3000 to 4000 parts per million, again depending on the manufacturers recommendation for their unit.  Converting to salt chlorine does not completely negate the possible need to use trichlor and or shock as a boosting effect, especially during the hottest part of the summer.  Also contrary to really bad information, one still has to maintain the other chemicals, Total Hardness, PH, Alkalinity, Stabilizer, as well as monitor Phosphate levels.  these being correct actually become more necessary in a slat chlorine pool in order to maintain a chlorine residue, and to keep from damaging or destroying the salt cell.

As the salt in the water passes over the energized cell, thru electrolysis it converts that salt to a type of chlorine.  most related to liquid shock.  this is not a long lasting chlorine, which is why the cell is constantly converting, after a short period of time, dependent on temperature and environment that chlorine turns back to salt, thus repeating the process while the pump is running.  the salt is not consumed in this process.  Also if one converts to salt chlorine, understand that if one puts salt in the pool and turns the generator on, without an already present chlorine residue, the generator will not be able to produce chlorine.  it will try, but it needs to have an already present chlorine level in order to "take over" the chlorine production.

Personally I have used and installed salt generators from Pentair, Jandy, Aquacal and SGS.  My least favorite is Aquacal, they are a good generator, but their boards are way to susceptible to shorting out.  the pentair system is pretty straight forward, and if there is a problem it usually means the cell needs to be replaced.  the Jandy aquapure is good but there have been issues with a bad batch of sensors.  My personal favorite from a technician standpoint is the SGS.  over 2 years of installing these and I have never had to trouble shoot one installed on a residential system.  The only failure I had was on a commercial pool and SGS replaced it pretty quickly.  i also like it because you can actually see the cell in its housing and can see when it needs to be cleaned.

just my $.02



I just replaced my Aquapuer generator this summer because the cells are no longer available.  Put in a Pentair and have been pleased with it so far.


Jandy has some weird stuff going on.  the best I can figure they had a series of cells and censors that were defective and they had to pull all stock so as to either rebuild them or build new ones without the defect, but they have been tight lipped about exactly what is wrong.  they are supposed to be back available by october according to the last conversation I had with Jandy tech support
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