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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 4/23/2016 8:19:00 PM EST
I would like to create the Latin verse for our family motto: "Try it and see what happens"

I used Google and some other translating programs and I get varying results. So I was wondering if there were any Latinese people here who could help?
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:19:42 PM EST
Romani ite domum
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:25:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By GreenBastard:
Romani ite domum
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Exactly the scene I was thinking of while trying to use the translators.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:26:19 PM EST
Sic Semper Lesbianus
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:29:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 8:32:05 PM EST by FrankSymptoms]
Adgressus est et quid accidit.

Had to change "try" to "attempt."


Nope. No good. Tried to translate it backward and got


Attacked and what happened
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:31:11 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 8:41:05 PM EST by RogerBall]
Pugnatisti (you singular fight?) Vicimus (you plural see?) mortem (death)

I am sorry it has been years since latin class.

Nope, not mine either. translated as "the fighter conquered death"
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:31:54 PM EST

Rytay Itay Danya Eesya Atwhay Penshapya
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:36:01 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Adgressus est et quid accidit.

Had to change "try" to "attempt."


Nope. No good. Tried to translate it backward and got


Attacked and what happened
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Yeah, I got the same thing when I tried it.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:50:49 PM EST
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, “If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean “perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 8:56:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 9:02:37 PM EST by RogerBall]
Still dumb but i'll take another swing at it.

Venit (they come?) et Vizit (they see?) delectum (destruction).

ETA: nope, way off base.

ETA also- it's a good thing I am not an ambassador because I myself might start a war
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:01:28 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Thuban:
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, "If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean "perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.
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Growing up Dad would always tell us "Try it and see what happens" when we asked him a question. When he put up an electric fence we asked him a dozen questions about how it works etc. and also how bad did it shock the animals. He told us to try it and see what it felt like. We would ask about making dry ice bombs and he would say try it, see what happens.

My brother and I see it as the official family motto. It must also be lucky, because we made it thru childhood in one piece.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:01:33 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Thuban:
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, “If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean “perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.
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Yeah, it's definitely idiomatic and will not translate well into Latin conveying the spirit it's meant to.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:04:14 PM EST
Nemo me impune lacessit.

Won't work unless your last name's Stuart, though.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:08:19 PM EST
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Originally Posted By bigstick61:


Yeah, it's definitely idiomatic and will not translate well into Latin conveying the spirit it's meant to.
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Originally Posted By bigstick61:
Originally Posted By Thuban:
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, “If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean “perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.


Yeah, it's definitely idiomatic and will not translate well into Latin conveying the spirit it's meant to.


Right, you can go the other way by stating "our family is strong, if you attack us, witness the results"
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:09:56 PM EST
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Originally Posted By RogerBall:


Right, you can go the other way by stating "our family is strong, if you attack us, witness the results"
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Originally Posted By RogerBall:
Originally Posted By bigstick61:
Originally Posted By Thuban:
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, "If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean "perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.


Yeah, it's definitely idiomatic and will not translate well into Latin conveying the spirit it's meant to.


Right, you can go the other way by stating "our family is strong, if you attack us, witness the results"

In my case it is more Our kid's are stupid and will hurt themselves learning..
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:30:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 9:33:45 PM EST by bigstick61]
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Originally Posted By substandard:

In my case it is more Our kid's are stupid and will hurt themselves learning..
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Originally Posted By substandard:
Originally Posted By RogerBall:
Originally Posted By bigstick61:
Originally Posted By Thuban:
I think the problem is that the phrase you are trying to translate is somewhat idiomatic.

When you say, "Try it and see what happens" I assume you mean, "If you attempt to do the thing I have warned you against, you shall face my retribution.”

But it could mean "perform the experiment and observe the results.” And it could mean a lot of other things too. It all depends on the context.


Yeah, it's definitely idiomatic and will not translate well into Latin conveying the spirit it's meant to.


Right, you can go the other way by stating "our family is strong, if you attack us, witness the results"

In my case it is more Our kid's are stupid and will hurt themselves learning..


I posted before you gave the full context. In your case, the verb you seek for "try" is "tento." If you want it to be a plural imperative, the conjugation is tentate; singular is tenta.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:34:31 PM EST

Illigitemi non carborum.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:55:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 9:55:47 PM EST by superdav]
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 9:56:24 PM EST
I'm not sure if accido or facio should be the root verb for "happens" in this context, nor what conjugation to use.

The rest should be as follows (singular and then plural addresses):

Tenta et vide quid (happens).

Tentate et videte quid (happens).
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:11:34 PM EST
Semper Ubi Sub Ubi is my unofficial family motto. You are welcome to use it instead.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:28:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Baronvonphildo:
Semper Ubi Sub Ubi is my unofficial family motto. You are welcome to use it instead.
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Ha! I studied Latin for 4 years in high school. I could read cicero's orations to the senate and most of the shit from Pompeii etc but when anyone asked me to say something in Latin I would always say semper ubi sub ubi.

When people asked why I took Latin classes I referenced the quote,"a wise man need not know Latin, but should have at least forgotten it."
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 10:34:34 PM EST
Semper ubi sub ubi.
Link Posted: 4/23/2016 11:05:38 PM EST
[Last Edit: 4/23/2016 11:09:11 PM EST by Kopec]
Tenta ut eventum videbis.

Try, so that you shall see the outcome.

I like the ut clause in this case: I think it preserves some of the intent of the idiomatic expression. "Tenta" is imperative affirmative singular, and "eventum" is accusative singular; with the verb "videbis", "you shall/will see."

This may not be correct, I'll have to research how the purpose clause can invoke an imperative. But it looks correct to me.
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 10:58:07 AM EST
ITT we learn who are no shit grammar nazis
Link Posted: 4/24/2016 12:27:08 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Kopec:
Tenta ut eventum videbis.

Try, so that you shall see the outcome.


I like the ut clause in this case: I think it preserves some of the intent of the idiomatic expression. "Tenta" is imperative affirmative singular, and "eventum" is accusative singular; with the verb "videbis", "you shall/will see."

This may not be correct, I'll have to research how the purpose clause can invoke an imperative. But it looks correct to me.
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I like that, close enough. Thanks.

As for the rest of what you typed, I have no clue what it means... (It's Greek to me)
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