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Posted: 9/15/2014 5:20:59 PM EST
Couple of years ago I received a Thule receiver style bike rack from my Dad for Christmas. Didn't try to mount it until the spring of that year to one of our SUV's (Wife's 2010 Suburban, my 2011 Avalanche...both with 2" receiver hitches) and when I went to tighten down the bolt from the truck hitch to the bike rack I noticed I could not get the bolt in more than about 2 to 2.5 turns. Pulled the rack out and noticed what looks like extra welding material on the face of and into the threads of the nut on the inside of the bike hitch. Bolt will only thread so far and I've not tried to force it. Called Thule, they sent us a new one and didn't ask for the old back (guessing shipping costs for would be excessive given how much it weights, said they would send a label).

Fast forward to now. Kids are getting older and wife and I are trying to exercise more. Second bike rack works great, then I remembered the first one still sitting in the garage attic. I'd like to fix this and then I can leave the rack on my truck when I think I can get a ride in vs. planning around wife's availability. What should I do to try to fix this? Try to re thread through the excess welding with tap/die set? Get new nut welded in the base of the rack? Wide open to suggestions. I have not tapped anything since HS shop class nor ever welded, but I'm game to try new things.










Link Posted: 9/15/2014 5:37:14 PM EST
just get a tap and retap the hole. not sure what size that bolt is, but looks like it could be 1/2-13, then again could be metric
Link Posted: 9/15/2014 5:39:14 PM EST
Take a file or die grinder and remove the extra weld then chase the threads with a tap to clean them up. This would be a 10 or 15 minute job if you had the right tools.
Link Posted: 9/15/2014 5:40:57 PM EST
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Originally Posted By wade231:
just get a tap and retap the hole. not sure what size that bolt is, but looks like it could be 1/2-13, then again could be metric
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See the bolt in the OPs picture look at the head and see that is says 8.8 that means it is metric
Link Posted: 9/15/2014 5:47:26 PM EST
I'd run a tap through that. Lots of cutting fluid, go slow, and torque is your friend.

Link Posted: 9/15/2014 6:29:32 PM EST
I would return it for new. You may get away with running a tap through there, but it may never be 100% correct.
Link Posted: 9/15/2014 7:01:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hunter101:
I would return it for new. You may get away with running a tap through there, but it may never be 100% correct.
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I can tell you didn't read the Op.
Link Posted: 9/15/2014 7:48:54 PM EST
10x1.25 metric tap, plenty of cutting oil, no drama
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 8:10:59 AM EST
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Take a file or die grinder and remove the extra weld then chase the threads with a tap to clean them up. This would be a 10 or 15 minute job if you had the right tools.
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This is what I would do. It looks like there is some pretty serious overlap of the weld into the hole. That will make it very difficult to get the tap started straight to chase the threads. I would remove the excess material first and then chase them...
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 8:36:46 AM EST
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Take a file or die grinder and remove the extra weld then chase the threads with a tap to clean them up. This would be a 10 or 15 minute job if you had the right tools.
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Can you point me in the right direction to specifically what tools I should get for this?
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 10:22:19 AM EST
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Originally Posted By NukeThemTillTheyGlow:


Can you point me in the right direction to specifically what tools I should get for this?
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Originally Posted By NukeThemTillTheyGlow:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Take a file or die grinder and remove the extra weld then chase the threads with a tap to clean them up. This would be a 10 or 15 minute job if you had the right tools.


Can you point me in the right direction to specifically what tools I should get for this?



Just go to a hardware store and get a small round metal cutting file or you could get this http://www.harborfreight.com/electric-die-grinder-with-long-shaft-44141.html and use the correct grinding tip for metal. As far as the tap you can take your bolt to Lowes hardware and in the nuts and bolt section they have threaded test holes to see what size metric bolt you have. Once you know what size tap you need it is a matter of finding one locally or order one off the internet. If you have a local machine shop it might be just as easy to take it to them.
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 12:54:40 PM EST
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:

I can tell you didn't read the Op.
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By hunter101:
I would return it for new. You may get away with running a tap through there, but it may never be 100% correct.

I can tell you didn't read the Op.


there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 1:42:13 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hunter101:
there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...
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LOLOLOL! That's the funniest thing I've read so far today.


I wouldn't bother filing and would not grind anything. I would start with a simple re-tapping of the hole using an appropriate tap and thread cutting fluid. If I could not get the tap started properly in the old threads (spin the tap backwards until the tap's threads synch up with the old threads), then I would get out a file and remove whatever burr was disturbing the tap's path.

P.S. - It does not matter which end you start from. If one side won't accept the tap, flip it over and try the doing it from the other side.
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 1:47:50 PM EST
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Originally Posted By hunter101:

there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...
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Originally Posted By hunter101:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By hunter101:
I would return it for new. You may get away with running a tap through there, but it may never be 100% correct.

I can tell you didn't read the Op.

there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...


So you would have a clue what you are talking about. If you had bother to read you would have seen where the op already had a new piece but he wanted try and salvage this one for another car.
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 3:19:04 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Trollslayer:



LOLOLOL! That's the funniest thing I've read so far today.


I wouldn't bother filing and would not grind anything. I would start with a simple re-tapping of the hole using an appropriate tap and thread cutting fluid. If I could not get the tap started properly in the old threads (spin the tap backwards until the tap's threads synch up with the old threads), then I would get out a file and remove whatever burr was disturbing the tap's path.

P.S. - It does not matter which end you start from. If one side won't accept the tap, flip it over and try the doing it from the other side.
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Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
Originally Posted By hunter101:
there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...



LOLOLOL! That's the funniest thing I've read so far today.


I wouldn't bother filing and would not grind anything. I would start with a simple re-tapping of the hole using an appropriate tap and thread cutting fluid. If I could not get the tap started properly in the old threads (spin the tap backwards until the tap's threads synch up with the old threads), then I would get out a file and remove whatever burr was disturbing the tap's path.

P.S. - It does not matter which end you start from. If one side won't accept the tap, flip it over and try the doing it from the other side.


Tap from the other side to align it.
It might be worth a try with a drill to see if you can clear some of it.
Link Posted: 9/16/2014 8:48:15 PM EST
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:


So you would have a clue what you are talking about. If you had bother to read you would have seen where the op already had a new piece but he wanted try and salvage this one for another car.
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Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By hunter101:
Originally Posted By JosephTurrisi:
Originally Posted By hunter101:
I would return it for new. You may get away with running a tap through there, but it may never be 100% correct.

I can tell you didn't read the Op.

there was pictures involved. why would i read that long drawn out write up...


So you would have a clue what you are talking about. If you had bother to read you would have seen where the op already had a new piece but he wanted try and salvage this one for another car.


Ok so you guys have me, I didnt read the post, I drew my conclusion based on the title and pics. I do have a clue about the task at hand here though. The pics arent that great but if it is no more than just weld splatter then op will definitely be able to clean the threads with a tap and be on his way. If there is actual weld withen the threaded area a tap will break. I know this from working in a field that does things like this on a daily basis. Good luck op, and thanks for everyone else reading my previous response.
Link Posted: 9/17/2014 12:24:19 PM EST
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Originally Posted By brickeyee:


Tap from the other side to align it.
It might be worth a try with a drill to see if you can clear some of it.
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Originally Posted By brickeyee:
Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
P.S. - It does not matter which end you start from. If one side won't accept the tap, flip it over and try the doing it from the other side.


Tap from the other side to align it.
It might be worth a try with a drill to see if you can clear some of it.

Do this, tap from the other side. My initial suggestion was based upon the fact that I thought the pictures showed a blind hole, but a closer look reveals that that hole goes all the way through correct?

Just run the tap in from the back side to ensure you get it started straight. The tap should clear all of that weld out of the way without the need for a file etc...
Link Posted: 9/22/2014 2:51:25 PM EST
Great input guys, thanks for all of the help. I was hoping that trying to tap it was a viable option. Have not done that since shop class in high school, but I am sure I can figure it out. I just don't want to cut new/cross threads..just clear out the original.

There is a hole on the other side of the hitch, should be able to get to the nut from that side. check it out and post new pics over weekend.
Link Posted: 10/6/2014 8:02:20 PM EST
Mission Accomplished!

Picked up a proper size tap and a new bolt just in case the threads on the bolt were messed up. Locked lower section of bike rack in vise, carefully screwed in the tap from back side until snug and straight....then used wrench to slower turn through entire length of nut. Slight resistance, nothing major and in about 30 seconds or so I was through. Flipped it over and did the same with slight pressure from the front side. slight pile of shavings underneath when done. Screwed in new and original bolt and they both work perfectly. Grabbed a bottle of CLP and applied to the bolt, works like a charm.

Many thanks for your help.
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